neil / tags / writing

Tagged with “writing” (10)

  1. Marcus du Sautoy and James Bridle – books podcast

    On this week’s show, we’re exploring infinity and beyond with artist and writer James Bridle and mathematician Marcus du Sautoy.

    Through his visual art and writings on technology and culture, James Bridle has been at the forefront of our understanding of tech for the last decade – and from his perspective, the view of our future is both exciting and gloomy. He sat down with the Guardian’s technology reporter Alex Hern to talk about his book, New Dark Age.

    Limits are grist to the mill for Marcus du Sautoy, professor of public understanding of science at Oxford University. His mission is to explore – and if possible, explain – the unknown, so following hot on the heels of his bestselling book What We Cannot Know, is How to Count to Infinity. Meeting with Richard Lea at the Hay festival, Du Sautoy explained how a German mathematician first proved the existence of infinity in 1874, and what the concept means for our understanding of the universe.

    —Huffduffed by neil

  2. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  3. Book Shambles - Season 4, Episode 1 - Alan Moore

    We’re back and kicking off Season 4 with one of the greatest writers in history. Alan Moore joins Josie and Robin to talk about the release of his new opus, Jerusalem as well as some of his epic back catalogue plus the work of HP Lovecraft, David Foster Wallace, Chuck D and more…

    Patreon supporters will also get an exclusive bonus hour with Alan talking about the process of creating Jerusalem.

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    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/cosmicgenome/book-shambles-season-4-episode-1-alan-moore
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 05 Oct 2016 23:15:57 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by neil

  4. Midnight in Karachi Episode 57: Margaret Atwood | Tor.com

    Welcome back to Midnight in Karachi, a weekly podcast about writers, publishers, editors, illustrators, their books and the worlds they create, hosted by Mahvesh Murad.

    The podcast returns this week with an interview with Margaret Atwood, in which she talks with Mahvesh about monsters, myths, wise old women, wicked witches, why everyone isn’t collectively freaking out about climate change and the potentials of eating cloned celebrity flesh.

    http://www.tor.com/2016/08/04/midnight-in-karachi-episode-57-margaret-atwood/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  5. Masha Tupitsyn - Love Sounds (Sexual Politics)

    Cinema remains the last medium for speaking and performing love culturally. While much emphasis has been placed on the visual iconography of love, with the exception of music very little attention has been given to love as an aural phenomenon since the tradition and practice of amour courtois. Partly inspired by Christian Marclay’s ontology of time in cinema, The Clock, and René Magritte’s word paintings, which textualized the visual tropes of painting with “written” images, Love Sounds, a 24-hour sound poem and montage, dematerializes cinema’s visual legacy and reconstitutes it as an all-tonal history of critical listening. Love Sounds, an audio history of love in cinema, concludes Tupitsyn’s immaterial trilogy, and will be presented as a 24-hour sound installation, accompanied by a catalogue published by Penny-Ante featuring written works by Masha Tupitsyn and contributors McKenzie Wark, Berit Fischer, Isiah Medina, C. Spencer Yeh, and Yaniya Lee. In 2011, Masha Tupitsyn commenced her immaterial series with LACONIA: 1,200 Tweets on Film, the first book of film criticism written entirely on Twitter. LACONIA experimented with new modes of writing and criticism, updating traditional literary forms and practices like the aphorism and the fragment. Re-imagining the wound-and-quest story, the love narrative, and the female subject in love in the digital age, Love Dog, published in 20…

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/112231115
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    Tagged with art writing

    —Huffduffed by neil

  6. Kenneth Goldsmith on “Uncreative Writing”

    "Poet and writer Kenneth Goldsmith talks to Steve Paulson about his "Uncreative Writing" course in which students are penalized for showing any originality and creativity. Goldsmith is the author of "Uncreative Writing: Managing Language in the Digital Age.""

    —Huffduffed by neil

  7. 5by5 | Getting There #33: Merlin Mann Shows Us His Panacea

    In which we talk with the brilliantly undefinable—yet always gracious—special guest: Merlin Mann. Best known as a cornerstone of the classic indie band Bacon Ray, he’s apparently also a prolific podcaster, renowned blogger, sometimes-comedian, and index card enthusiast. However, he’s here today because of his (and all joking aside) amazing insight into, advice about, and dissection of the areas of productivity, motivation, and, well, just trying to get there. As he tackles our listeners’ questions (as well as our own), we get a couple hours of some classic Merlin-Mann-ing.

    http://5by5.tv/ladybits/33

    —Huffduffed by neil