neil / tags / tory

Tagged with “tory” (14)

  1. Psychohistory: Isaac Asimov and guiding the future

    100 years on from Isaac Asimov’s birth, Matthew Sweet looks at one of the bigger ideas contained in some of his 500 books; Psychohistory.

    The idea, from Asimov’s Foundation series, was that rather like the behaviour of a gas could be reduced to statistical probabilities of the behaviour of billions of molecules, so the history of billions of human beings across the fictional galactic empire could be predicted through a few laws he called ‘Psychohistory’.

    The idea inspired many to think that social sciences and economics can really be reduced to some sort of idealized set of physics principles, making future events completely predictable. It and similar ideas are still breeding enthusiasm for such things as data science, AI, machine learning, and arguably even the recent job advert by Downing Street advisor Dominic Cummings for more ‘Super-Talented Wierdos’ to work for government. But how do we see what is real and what is not, what is Sci-Fi and what is hype, what is reasonable and what is desirable, in the gaps between innovation and inspiration, restraint and responsibility?

    Jack Stilgoe of University College London has a new book out ‘Who’s Driving Innovation?’. Science and Tech journalist Gemma Milne’s forthcoming book is called ‘Smoke and Mirrors: How hype obscures the future and How to see past it’. Una McCormack is an expert on science fiction writing at Anglia Ruskin University, and Alexander Boxer is a data scientist who’s new book ‘Scheme of Heaven’ makes the case that we have much to learn about human efforts to deduce the future from observable events by looking at the history of Astrology, its aims and techniques.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p080lvrb

    —Huffduffed by neil

  2. René Girard on ritual sacrifice and the scapegoat | Entitled Opinions

     René Girard was born in 1923, in the southern French city of Avignon on Christmas day. Between 1943 and 1947, he studied in Paris at the École des Chartres, an institution for the training of archivists and historians, where he specialized in medieval history. In 1947 he went to Indiana University on a year’s fellowship and eventually made almost his entire career in the United States. He completed a Ph.D. in history at Indiana University in 1950 but also began to teach literature, the field in which he would first make his reputation. He taught at Duke University and at Bryn Mawr before becoming a professor at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. In 1971 he went to the State University of New York at Buffalo for five years, returned to Johns Hopkins, and then finished his academic career at Stanford where he taught between 1981 and his retirement in 1995. Girard was the first Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French language, literature, and civilization at Stanford University. With his first two books, Deceit, Desire, and the Novel and Dostoievski: du double à l’unité, Girard rejected the literary retreat of the 1950s and early 1960s from concern with history, society, and the psyche. His initial works analyzed literary texts of Cervantes, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, and Dostoyevsky in terms of "triangular" or "mimetic" desire: our desires are copied from models or mediators whose objects of desire become our objects of desire. But the model or mediator we imitate can become our rival if we desire precisely the object he is imagined to have. Or other imitators of the same model may compete with us for the same objects. Jealousy and envy are inevitably aroused in this mimetic situation. Girard began to study primitive religions from the standpoint of the mimetic concept, and he saw that mimesis usually led to collective violence against a single victim, the scapegoat. Girard’s most important book is Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World. In the form of a dialogue with two psychiatrists, Jean-Michel Oughourlian and Guy Lefort, its format is a triptych: (1) Fundamental Anthropology, (2) The Judeo-Christian Scriptures, (3) Individual Psychology. In this book Girard declared himself, in effect, as a Christian and advocated a nonsacrificial reading of the Gospels and the divinity of Christ. Girard continues to lecture and write and still offers a seminar at Stanford, where he and his wife Martha make their home. Retired since the summer of 1995, Girard is still actively engaged in thinking and writing.  

    https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/ren-girard-ritual-sacrifice-and-scapegoat

    —Huffduffed by neil

  3. Yuval Noah Harari On Why Clarity is Power | Rich Roll

    Ultra-athlete Rich Roll talks with bestselling author Yuval Noah Harari about the most pressing issues currently facing mankind.

    http://www.richroll.com/podcast/yuval-noah-harari-392/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  4. 95 | The Politics of Mental Health — Talking Politics

    This week we discuss how and why mental health has become a growing political issue.  What are the differences in the way the political parties approach this problem?  Is it something that unites or divides people across generations and classes?  And what can politicians do to help us cope?  Plus we talk about whether politics itself has become a more stressful job than it used to be.  With Helen Thompson and Chris Brooke. 

    https://www.talkingpoliticspodcast.com/blog/2018/95-the-politics-of-mental-health

    —Huffduffed by neil

  5. BBC Radio 4 - Computing Britain, ERNIE Picks Prizes

    In 1956, adverts enticed the British public with a brand new opportunity. Buy premium bonds for one pound, for the chance to win a thousand. At the time, it was a fortune - half the price of the average house.

    Behind this tantalising dream was a machine called ERNIE - the Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment.

    ERNIE was built by the team who constructed Colossus, the code-breaking engine housed at Bletchley Park. They had just nine months to make a machine that generated random numbers using all the latest kit, from printed circuit boards to metal transistors.

    In this episode, mathematician Hannah Fry talks to Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum about how ERNIE became an unlikely celebrity. Featuring archive from NS&I, the Science Museum and the BBC Library.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b069wzvw

    —Huffduffed by neil

  6. Predicting the future with Rachel Andrew, Eric Meyer, and Jeffrey Zeldman | The Web Ahead

    The landscape of what’s possible in web page layout is changing. Jen has a theory that this change will be a big one — perhaps the biggest change to graphic design on the web in over 15 years. Rachel, Jeffrey, and Eric join her to debate if that’s true or not, and to surmise what the future might bring. This special episode was recorded live at An Event Apart Nashville.

    http://www.thewebahead.net/115

    —Huffduffed by neil

  7. Track Changes: The Web Is Dead

    This week Paul and Rich eulogize the web, which has been dying since its inception. They compare the early, organicmdays of the web with today’s trends towards massive commercial centralization. They also talk about Outbrain and Taboola (“20 slides spread over 400 pages”), Disqus and Facebook comment threads, and the hellscape that is wish.com, leading Rich to declare, “Maybe the web sucks! Maybe it should die!”

    http://trackchanges.libsyn.com/the-web-is-dead

    —Huffduffed by neil

  8. SmashingConf Barcelona 2015: Graphic Design in the 21st Century: Is the Internet Killing Creativity?

    Is the internet, for all its technology, best-practice guides, metrics and measurements making us better designers? Or is it killing creativity, homogenising ideas and undermining the notion of original thought? Join me as I explore how the practice of graphic design has changed since the information revolution.

    ===
    Original video: https://vimeo.com/145055819
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by neil

Page 1 of 2Older