neil / tags / talks

Tagged with “talks” (12)

  1. Guided Metta Meditation 4 - Akincano Marc Weber’s Dharma Talks

    Teaching is essentially translation. It means ferrying an authentic contemplative tradition across choppy waters into our psychological and cultural realities, losing neither the vision nor the truth of what we know to be our immediate experience.

    https://dharmaseed.org/teacher/360/talk/51205/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  2. Dharma Seed - Howard Cohn’s Dharma Talks

    I continually point toward this secret of the present moment, for if I am really present, I don’t suffer as much, I don’t cause as much suffering, and I am less afraid.

    I may experience intense pain or pleasure, but the degree of mental suffering lessens.

    Practicing mindfulness de-conditions the habits that prevent me from being centered in the present.

    This in turn gives me a more stable awareness, which allows me to recognize my inherent peace and

    freedom.

    It is this taste of nowness—introducing people to the living quality of the present moment and its sense of freedom—that most engages me in my teaching practice.

    I find no evidence of suffering, in my mind, unless I remind myself of some event that is not in the present.

    Suffering arises when I am lost in my imagination, reviewing the past or fearfully anticipating the future.

    I feel tremendous gratitude and love for the dharma, and the practice of awareness.

    Knowing my mind a little better, and being less preoccupied with my internal drama, makes me more available to the suffering of others.

    Consequently, I am moved to give to others rather than focusing on what I can get.

    In spite of being more attuned to suffering, staying present allows each day to become more joyful, compelling and intereesting.

    My desire to run from this moment, by running after an imagined, better future, or away from a past fear, has diminished.

    It is present wakefulness that helps me recover my capacity to live with balance and ease in the world.

    http://www.dharmaseed.org/teacher/82/talk/51924/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  3. James Bridle: The nightmare videos of children’s YouTube — and what’s wrong with the internet today | TED Talk

    Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From "surprise egg" reveals and the "Finger Family Song" to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds — and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. "We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them," Bridle says.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/james_bridle_the_nightmare_videos_of_childrens_youtube_and_what_s_wrong_with_the_internet_today

    —Huffduffed by neil

  4. Zeynep Tufekci: We’re building a dystopia just to make people click on ads | TED Talk

    We’re building an artificial intelligence-powered dystopia, one click at a time, says techno-sociologist Zeynep Tufekci. In an eye-opening talk, she details how the same algorithms companies like Facebook, Google and Amazon use to get you to click on ads are also used to organize your access to political and social information. And the machines aren’t even the real threat. What we need to understand is how the powerful might use AI to control us — and what we can do in response.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/zeynep_tufekci_we_re_building_a_dystopia_just_to_make_people_click_on_ads/details

    —Huffduffed by neil

  5. The Talk Show ✪: Ep. 202, With Special Guest Joanna Stern

    The Talk Show

    ‘You Tell Me If It’s a Dongle’, With Special Guest Joanna Stern

    Saturday, 30 September 2017

    Special guest Joanna Stern returns to the show. Topics include Apple Watch Series 3, our mutual fear of heights, Velcro, and more.

    Download MP3.

    Sponsored by:

    Away: Travel smarter with the suitcase that charges your phone. Get $20 off with code talkshow.

    Squarespace: Build it beautiful. Use code talkshow for 10% off your first order.

    Fracture: Your pictures, printed directly on glass.

    Eero: Finally, Wi-Fi that works. Use code THETALKSHOW for free overnight shipping in the US and Canada.

    Links:

    3-way cable from Monoprice

    30-watt charger from Anker ($26)

    Apple’s 29-watt charger is $49

    Anker’s amazing $14 portable charger.

    Don’t Call It Velcro

    Joanna’s Apple Watch Series 3 review

    Tiny MacBook Air

    John’s customized suitcase from Joanna.

    This episode of The Talk Show was edited by Caleb Sexton.

    https://daringfireball.net/thetalkshow/2017/09/30/ep-202

    —Huffduffed by neil

  6. James Ward: ‘I like boring things’

    James is the founder of the Boring Conference, a day dedicated to the mundane, the ordinary, the obvious and the overlooked. In his disappointingly un-boring talk, he reveals the transformative power of attention and how to find the fascinating in the most unlikely places.

    ===
    Original video: https://vimeo.com/37463645
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sun, 28 Aug 2016 07:58:16 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    Tagged with talks

    —Huffduffed by neil

  7. Adam Grant: The surprising habits of original thinkers | TED Talk | TED.com

    How do creative people come up with great ideas? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant studies "originals": thinkers who dream up new ideas and take action to put them into the world. In this talk, learn three unexpected habits of originals — including embracing failure. "The greatest originals are the ones who fail the most, because they’re the ones who try the most," Grant says. "You need a lot of bad ideas in order to get a few good ones."

    http://www.ted.com/talks/adam_grant_the_surprising_habits_of_original_thinkers

    —Huffduffed by neil

  8. Joshua Foer: Feats of memory anyone can do | TED Talk | TED.com

    There are people who can quickly memorize lists of thousands of numbers, the order of all the cards in a deck (or ten!), and much more. Science writer Joshua Foer describes the technique — called the memory palace — and shows off its most remarkable feature: anyone can learn how to use it, including him.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/joshua_foer_feats_of_memory_anyone_can_do?language=en

    —Huffduffed by neil

Page 1 of 2Older