neil / tags / life

Tagged with “life” (13)

  1. Productive Talk Compilation: 8-episode podcast with GTD’s David Allen | 43 Folders

    Download MP3 of "Productive Talk Compilation" As promised, here’s the single-file compilation of the Productive Talk podcast interviews I did with David Allen, the author of Getting Things Done. The final version’s eight episodes clock in at a

    http://www.43folders.com/2006/11/28/productive-talk-comp

    —Huffduffed by neil

  2. Podcast #535: The Problem of Self-Help in a Liquid Age | The Art of Manliness

    Self-help gurus, life coaches, and business consultants love to tell us that we must strive for constant self-improvement to realize our full potential and become truly happy. But it doesn’t seem to work — for many of us, life still seems hollow and meaningless. So focused are we on personal development and material possessions that …

    https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/podcast-535-the-problem-of-self-help-in-a-liquid-age/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  3. 391 - Yuval Noah Harari: 21 Lessons for The 21st Century - Altucher Confidential

    “Right now, there is somebody out there who is trying to hack you. And not just one…”

    WHAT!?

    “Amazon is trying to hack you. Google is trying to hack you. Coca-Cola is trying to hack you and the Russians, the American government, the Chinese… They are all trying to hack you right now,” Yuval Noah Harari said on my podcast.

    But there are different levels of hacking.

    Amazon wants to sell you stuff. We all know that. But when does it start to get darker? And how can we protect ourselves?

    I was asking Yuval because this is one of the things he writes about in his new book “21 Lessons for the 21st Century,” which Bill Gates recommended in a New York Times article last week.

    Yuval is an expert in human evolution. Past, present and future. He writes international bestsellers about our species.

    And no. Yuval does not know Bill Gates. I asked him. They’ve never spoken.

    I’ve recommended his book, “Sapiens” more than any other book in the past 5 years.

    Mark Zuckerberg and Barack Obama are also advocates of Yuval’s books.

    That’s a quadfecta.

    There’s a huge pyramid of research beneath each story Yuval writes about.

    But it wasn’t always this way. He used to write about things nobody cared about.

    “What happened in your life where you decided to be the smartest person on the planet?” I asked. “I feel like 8 years ago you must’ve had a tumor or a stroke. Because you were writing about knights and medieval fighting and then suddenly you write the three smartest books ever written.”

    “One thing is that I got tenure at the university. “I could do whatever I wanted. And I no longer had to feel the publish or perish pressure.”

    He’s a history professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

    “But a lot of people get tenure,” I said.

    “Yeah, that’s true, but for many people it’s too late. By the time they get tenure, they forgot what they really wanted to do. And somehow, I still remembered.”

    That’s how we got the trilogy: “Sapiens,” “Homo Deus” and “21 Lessons for the 21st Century.”

    In the new book, Yuval explore so many topics: “the myth of free will,” the rise of robots, algorithms, hackers, how the Automation Revolution will impact the economy, your job, your quality of life and so on.

    Plus, he also gives solutions. And they’re all worth contemplating. This interview is probably the most thought-provoking interview I’ve ever aired.

    Here’s 3 things Yuval Noah Harari made me question:

    A) Are we actually better off?

    Yuval says “Life was much more colorful and rich 10,000 years ago.”

    We foraged. We climbed trees. We weren’t sitting at desks or managing cash register machines. We were moving.

    But history books have branded the Agricultural Revolution as a good thing. A “revolution.” But Yuval argues that farming and harvesting wheat was actually a negative to the species in many ways.

    It’s both.

    Positive: we can feed more people.

    Negative: our diet changes to wheat-based instead of plants, vegetables, etc. And our brains might have shrunk as a result of us only be aware of the space around us and not the greater landscape, which lead to city-states and kingdoms and war. Because we fought each other for resources.

    And Yuval says life as a hunter-gatherer is far more interesting than some of the mundane jobs of the 21st century.

    And Yuval has other examples.

    How many “revolutions” are actually net-negatives?

     

    B) What happens if I’m not the main character?

    Everyday, I think about my day. What am I going to do? What do I want to eat? Where am I going?

    Yuval said, “Every time you change your perspective, you see a completely different world.”

    “Don’t look at from the viewpoint of the king. ;ook at from the viewpoint of the peasant. Don’t look at from the viewpoint of the human. Look at it from the viewpoint of the cow.”

     

    C) Is free will a myth?

    Yuval says free will is a myth.

    “People know so little about themselves,” he said. “Both on the biological level, certainly. How many people really understand their brains? But even on the psychological level… we have an entire profession of therapists who are just trying to help us get in touch with ourselves because it’s so difficult.”

    Yuval says that free will only exists if you know what your will actually is. But if you everything want in life comes from school, your parents, cultural manipulation, advertising, propaganda, etc., then do you really have your own desires?

    “Once you realize, no, my desires don’t reflect my free will, they reflect all kinds of processes on the biological level, on the psychological level, which I don’t understand, then you start being very curious about yourself.”

    His book and this interview leads to so many new questions. Which is the essense of growth. Learning comes from wondering.

    Yuval will make you young again.

    He’ll make you curious again.

    I release 3 minisodes to go along with the full interview. So  let’s say you don’t have a full hour. That’s ok. The minisodes are 5, 6, 7 minutes long. I always say that health isn’t just physical. It’s mental, it’s emotional (being around good people) and it’s creative.

    Learning something new is part of health.

    That’s what the minisodes are for. To help make learning easier. And more accessible.

    Here are 3 with Yuval:

    Someone Is Trying to Hack You [7 minutes]

     

    Are We Actually Better Off? Questioning Evolutionary History…  [6 minutes]

     

    The (Threatening) Promise of New Technology [5 minutes]

    Links and Resources

    21 Lessons for the 21st Century by Yuval Noah Harari

    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari

    Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari

    Yuval’s course on Coursera

    The Journey towards Personal Freedom Starts with YOU

    It’s time to make the most important decision of your life: Choose Yourself.

    I will show you how…

    Every weekday I’ll send my latest stories, ideas and exclusive interviews straight to your inbox.

    Sign up below for Altucher Confidential, my FREE e-letter.

    By submitting your email address, you will receive a free subscription to Altucher Confidential. This daily investment newsletter delivers free independent financial forecasting and commentary along with carefully selected products and services that we think might interest you. We will not share your email address and you can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Statement.

    https://jamesaltucher.com/2018/09/391-yuval-noah-harari/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  4. 312 - Jordan B. Peterson: 12 Rules for Life: A Solution to Suffering - Altucher Confidential

    “You have the ideal life,” I said. “You think about things. And people pay attention. And you get paid for it.” I was talking to Jordan B. Peterson. His YouTube channel has tens of millions of views. He’s a clinical psychologist, professor and author of “12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos,” and now a guest on this podcast.

    People stop him on the street. They say “Thank you.” They say, “You’ve changed my life.”

    “What did you say that helped their life?” I asked.

    But I already knew the answer…

    Because it’s true for me too.

    He told them what they were ready to hear. That’s it. And they acted. Sometimes people thank me. And I tell them “You did it.” Then we take a picture and I feel happy.

    I asked Jordan about his “12 rules for life.”

    “I tried to lay out the phenomenal logical landscape of humanity in this book,” Jordan said.

    I interrupted.

    “What’s phenomenal logical?”

    “It’s life as experienced. Ya know, you think, ‘What’s reality?’ Well, there’s material reality, but that isn’t the reality you live. You live a reality that’s full of emotions and motivations and personal experiences. That’s your reality.”

    I stayed silent. I was collecting.

    “But what’s the structure of that reality? What’s the fundamental structure of the human-lived reality?” he said. “Part of it is suffering because we’re finite and limited. But it’s suffering that’s tainted with malevolence because some of that suffering is unnecessary. You cause it, society causes it. It doesn’t have to happen. That’s the world we live in. It’s hard and it’s cruel.”

    Then he said this “You’re stuck with that. That’s the bottom line. So how are you going to deal with it?”

    I think that’s the basis of how we live. The answer to that question “how are you going to deal with it?” With losing money, hating your job, getting fired. That’s the act. The response is life.

    Let me send you my best (and most controversial) stuff…

    I’ve spoken to some of the top innovators, investors and peak performers in the world…

    And I’d like to share what I’ve learned, and continue to learn, for free.

    Every weekday, I’ll send my latest stories, ideas and exclusive interviews straight to your inbox.

    Sign up below for Altucher Confidential, my FREE e-letter.

    By submitting your email address, you will receive a free subscription to Altucher Confidential. This daily investment newsletter delivers free independent financial forecasting and commentary along with carefully selected products and services that we think might interest you. We will not share your email address and you can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Statement.

    He gave me a lot of steps (for dealing with cruelty and suffering). I’ll give you some in a minute. But you should also listen to him on the podcast because he gives so much more in that one hour than I could ever collect on this page.

    STEP 1 - Get in touch with your dissatisfaction.

    STEP 2 - Take stock of your life (what can you do differently? What are the small steps? Don’t actually take them (yet). Just start by learning what you don’t like and what you do like in your life right now). Do that for a week.

    Those steps continue. But he also said this:

    “You have to choose your pathway of suffering. That’s one way of thinking about it. You can choose the suffering that’s associated with deceit, arrogance, resentment, bitterness or you can choose the suffering that’s associated with truth. The suffering that’s associated with truth transcends. It starts to make things better. Deceit makes life worse. And truth makes it better. ”

    I needed examples. Dozens of them.

    I just kept throwing life problems at Jordan to see what he’d say. He told me how he solves conflicts with his wife. And how he managed his depression. He told me his thoughts on “the grind of life.”

    Because it’s everyday. And it’s hard.

    But there are things we can do to make ourselves more okay with our chaos and the chatter between our ears. We can follow rules (like Jordan’s) or make our own.

    I’m doing both.

    Links and Resources

    "12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos" by Jordan B. Peterson

    Jordan’s website: jordanbpeterson.com

    Follow Jordan on Twitter and Facebook

    Watch him on YouTube (his channel has millions of views)

    Also Mentioned

    "Tools of Titans" by Tim Ferriss

    Jordan’s interview with Joe Rogan 

    Carl Panzeran

    A quote from Carl Jung: "Modern people can’t see god because they won’t look low enough"

    Thanks so much for listening! If you like this episode, please subscribe to “The James Altucher Show” and rate and review wherever you get your podcasts:

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    The Journey towards Personal Freedom Starts with YOU

    It’s time to make the most important decision of your life: Choose Yourself.

    I will show you how…

    Every weekday I’ll send my latest stories, ideas and exclusive interviews straight to your inbox.

    Sign up below for Altucher Confidential, my FREE e-letter.

    By submitting your email address, you will receive a free subscription to Altucher Confidential. This daily investment newsletter delivers free independent financial forecasting and commentary along with carefully selected products and services that we think might interest you. We will not share your email address and you can unsubscribe at any time. Privacy Statement.

    https://jamesaltucher.com/2018/02/jordan-b-peterson/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  5. Michael Kenny – E.P. Thompson – Last of the English Radicals? | Backdoor Broadcasting Company

    Event Date: 8 May 2017

    Keynes Library

    Birkbeck University of London

    43 Gordon Square

    London WC1H 0PD

    The Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life presents:

    Professor Michael Kenny (QMUL) – E.P. Thompson – Last of the English Radicals? 

    The English radical lineage has been repeatedly invoked on the British left in recent years: as an antidote to the technocratic character of social democratic thought and rigidity of socialist orthodoxy; and for its intimate relationship with English traditions at a point when ‘Englishness’ appears resurgent. Edward Thompson, one of Britain’s leading public historians, best known intellectuals and leading figure in the peace movement during the 1980s, is often seen as the last exemplar of this tradition. This lecture takes a critical look at this characterisation. It also reappraises standard dismissals of Thompson’s patriotism, asking what kind of Englishness was at stake in the work of the author of The Making of the English Working Class. It explores the shifting ways in which he wrote – as historian, intellectual contrarian and romantic critic — about the English radical tradition, and compares Thompson’s raucous, eclectic and argumentative conception of this lineage with latter-day progressive thinking. The lecture finishes by asking who in British politics can lay claim to the title deeds of Thompson’s brand of English radicalism.

    Michael Kenny is a Professor of Politics at Queen Mary University of London. He has written widely on British political thought and politics, and is the author of The Politics of English Nationhood (2014), The Politics of Identity (2004) and author of the Preface to the Penguin Modern Classics edition of E.P.Thompson’s The Making of the English Working Class (2013). He is currently writing a book, with Nick Pearce, on The Anglosphere in British Politics, which will be published by Polity Press.

    Chair and Introduction by Dr Jason Edwards (Birkbeck).

     

    Helena Kennedy - Using the Law for Social Justice and other Utopian Ideals - Session 2

    May 4, 2017

    BdBC - René

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    Gerald Lang - What Follows from Defensive Non-Liability?

    May 8, 2017

    BdBC - René

    0

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    http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2017/05/michael-kenny-e-p-thompson-last-of-the-english-radicals/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  6. Public lectures and events: media player - Public lectures and events - Channels - Video and audio - News and media - Home

    Editor’s note: This podcast contains explicit language, please do not download if you may be offended.

    Speaker(s): Shaa Wasmund

    Chair: Marta Costas

    Recorded on 8 September 2015

    Entrepreneur and author of bestsellers Stop Talking, Start Doing and Do Less, Get More, Shaa Wasmund explains how to apply the well-known Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto’s ‘law of the vital few’ to become more productive and happy. This event marks the publication of her latest book Do Less, Get More: How to Work Smart and Live Life Your Way. Shaa Wasmund (@shaawasmund) is one of the UK’s most prominent female entrepreneurs and a champion of small businesses. She is the founder and driving force behind Smarta, the UK’s leading support platform for small business owners and in 2015 she was awarded an MBE for services to business and entrepreneurship. Shaa is an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Marta Costas is Director of Grantfair and has a decade of experience helping companies in the Technology, Media and Telecoms (TMT) sector connect with public sector organisations, navigating complex regulatory structures, raising funding for innovative projects and helping to shape public policy. Marta is Chair of LEAG, the LSE Entrepreneur-Alumni Group having graduated from LSE with an MSc in European Social Policy in 2007.

    Event posting

    http://www.lse.ac.uk/newsAndMedia/videoAndAudio/channels/publicLecturesAndEvents/player.aspx?id=3191

    —Huffduffed by neil

  7. Cass Sunstein, “Choosing Not to Choose: Understanding the Value of Choice” (Oxford UP, 2015)

    Cass SunsteinView on AmazonThe political tradition of liberalism tends to associate political liberty with the individual’s freedom of choice. The thought is that political freedom is intrinsically tied to the individual’s ability to select one’s own path in life – […]

    http://newbooksinphilosophy.com/2015/09/01/cass-sunstein-choosing-not-to-choose-understanding-the-value-of-choice-oxford-up-2015/

    —Huffduffed by neil

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