neil / tags / grid

Tagged with “grid” (3)

  1. 234: Rapidfire 70 - ShopTalk

    What are your thoughts on atomic CSS? Is responsive web design making traditional web design less important? How should you animate between pages of websites? Does podcasting while wearing suits make for a better episode? It’s a RapidFire episode celebrating our 234th episode.

    Q & A

    5:15 I’ve just start as a freelancer and I’m asking myself what I do for the billing when I’m using a web font from a service like TypeKit?

    8:15 Could the device-width media feature be used to achieve common break points between iframes and their parent pages? How can you get these in sync? Sample CodePen

    14:23 I’ve been trying to improve the build automation where I work. Your ideas/thoughts on how this could be achieved and on the speed differences in FE task runners would be great.

    22:10 How do you manage the web development process? I often feel like I’m at a constant battle between a “good” product and satisfying my boss?

    28:00 I feel a little reluctant to include open source marital in something I would present to a possible employer, is this hesitation justified?

    33:32 Are single-use classes a good way to go for a large, shared codebase? I work for a large company with multiple front-end devs on each project, and the more I look at our growing stylesheet, the more I feel this is a way to go.

    42:37 I am wondering if traditional design is becoming less important. I started feeling this way few years ago. With RWD, designers don’t create new design but we just pick a design pattern. Sometimes I wonder if my clients will have just as much success if they just used something like Squarespace.

    51:50 A lot of clients are asking for sites with lots of animations and site transitions. Have you heard of anything like that?

    Links

    Dave and Chris wearing suits

    NPM Scripts

    Marvel Group on RWD Podcast

    Atomic CSS

    Sports.Yahoo.com

    Modular CSS

    Labs.Jensimmons.com

    Barba.js

    Paravel Portfolio

    Sponsors

    Media Temple * 32:05

    Media Temple’s wildly popular Grid Hosting has been revamped! The Grid Personal plan is now only $20 a month and gives you 100 sites, 100 databases, 20 GB of SSD storage, 1000 email boxes, and more. If you outgrow that, for only $30 a month you get five times that on the Grid Pro plan.

    We use Media Temple hosting right here on ShopTalk Show!

    Visit Media Temple and check out the updated Grid Hosting plans

    Job Mention

    Shoptalk Show Job Board

    Standard Podcast [ 58:56 ] Download

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/234-rapidfire-70/

    —Huffduffed by neil

  2. Come With Me If You Want To Live, or How To Survive A Time Travel Paradox

    At a conference focused on ‘designing the future’, the concept of and narratives about time travel seem like inevitable topics of conversation. While there are a wide variety of types of time travel stories, the narrative Ingrid has been thinking about the most is the one in which someone from the future (or, depending on how you think about time travel paradoxes, a future) comes to the past and intervenes to rewrite and/or game their present.

    Ingrid has been thinking about this particular kind of time travel for a few reasons. One is that she has been kind of obsessed with the Terminator movies (for reasons she’ll get into a little bit later) and the other is she’s been interested in emerging technologies and systems that, while not literally from the future, share certain motivations with the revisionist time traveler. The time machines used today don’t look like Deloreans. They look like NTP servers and low-latency networks, like real-time data streams and predictive models, visitors from algorithmically bestowed futures to let us fix, or at least game, our current conditions.

    These systems for forecasting futures, however, often lend themselves to the same predestination paradox or self-fulfilling prophecy faced by the T-800 in the first Terminator movie. SKYNET creates John Connor by trying to kill Sarah Connor, governments create terrorists by trying to find terrorists, capitalism eats itself by trying to move faster than capitalism.

    So Ingrid been thinking a lot about this because she’s been thinking about resistance—resistance within time travel narratives and resistance to proscribed futures. How do you design a future with resistance built in? What does that resistance look like? In popular time travel narratives, it tends to look like a lot of property destruction—like taking, or quite literally breaking, time and time machines. While she may not be completely sold on that method, there are some examples of acts of civil disobedience that she thinks might offer some insights into the fragility of futures and why, exactly, the Terminators keep on coming.

    http://2015.dconstruct.org/speaker/ingrid-burrington

    Ingrid Burrington writes, makes maps, and tells jokes on a small island off the coast of America. She’s a member of Deep Lab, the author of Networks of New York: An Internet Infrastructure Field Guide, and currently an artist in residence at the Data and Society Research Institute.

    —Huffduffed by neil