95 | The Politics of Mental Health — Talking Politics

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    Racism not only shaped American life in the age of the Great Depression, but Hitler looked fondly at the American South, which was more explicit and more degrading than anything taking place in Germany at the time. Ira Katznelson and David Runciman look at American liberalism when it was at the height of its power in the 1930s and 1940s.

    Guests:
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    Dr David Runciman, Senior Lecturer Cambridge University

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    Author: Ira Katznelson
    Publisher: Norton
    ISBN: 978 0 87140 450 3

    Title: The Confidence Trap
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    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/latenightlive/the-new-deal-and-the-origins-of-our-time/4682170

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  2. theForum – The Politics of Mental Health

    Victoria Dutchman-Smith/ Emmy Eklundh/ Matthew Ratcliffe

    Listen to the recording here or on YouTube

    At the intersection of the personal and the political, we explore the relationship between mental health and economics, politics, and society at large. Is it even possible to distinguish between mental illness that derives from an individual’s physiology or childhood experience and that which has broader social or political causes? Why do particular mental illnesses appear to characterize certain eras? Could social change limit the spread of mental illness in contemporary society?

    SpeakersVictoria Dutchman-Smith, Journalist and commentatorEmmy Eklundh, Teaching Fellow in Spanish and International Politics, King’s College LondonMatthew Ratcliffe, Professor for Theoretical Philosophy, University of Vienna

    ChairDanielle Sands, Fellow, The Forum; Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London

    6.30 – 8pm | 8 November 2017

    Sheikh Zayed Theatre, LSE

    Image credit: James Box, ‘Balance‘

    http://blogs.lse.ac.uk/theforum/the-politics-of-mental-health/

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  3. The Politics of Mental Health

    At the intersection of the personal and the political, we explore the relationship between mental health and economics, politics, and society at large. Is it even possible to distinguish between mental illness that derives from an individual’s physiology or childhood experience and that which has broader social or political causes? Why do particular mental illnesses appear to characterize certain eras? Could social change limit the spread of mental illness in contemporary society?

    SPEAKERS

    Victoria Dutchman-Smith Journalist and commentator

    Emmy Eklundh Teaching Fellow in Spanish and International Politics, King’s College London

    Matthew Ratcliffe Professor for Theoretical Philosophy, University of Vienna

    CHAIR

    Danielle Sands Fellow, The Forum Lecturer in Comparative Literature and Culture, Royal Holloway, University of London

    Recorded on 8 November 2017 at the LSE

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HKj1PK9rPAc&feature=youtu.be
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 18 Jun 2019 08:29:30 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    https://play.acast.com/s/talkingpolitics/whereistheopposition-

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    https://www.talkingpoliticspodcast.com/blog/2020/225-superforecasting

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  6. Black Marxism after George Floyd

    Cedric Johnson is associate professor of African American studies and political science at the University of Illinois at Chicago and editor of The Neoliberal Deluge: Hurricane Katrina, Late Capitalism and the Remaking of New Orleans (University of Minnesota Press, 2011).

    In this live stream, we’ll be discussing the prospects for an emancipatory politics emerging from the death of George Floyd and how to understand the black politics alongside class politics.

    Tagged with political science

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  7. Masks force the latest government U-turn: Politics Weekly podcast | Politics | The Guardian

    Heather Stewart and Polly Toynbee look at the latest news from Westminster. Dan Sabbagh explains what the Huawei decision means for the Tory government. Plus, Rajeev Syal talks the Welsh minister for health, Vaughan Gething

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/audio/2020/jul/15/masks-force-the-latest-government-u-turn-politics-weekly-podcast

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