mrjoe / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (11)

  1. The Compiler—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Installing Windows might take 5,000 years without the compiler, a remarkable innovation which made modern computing possible. Tim Harford tells a compelling story which has at its heart a pioneering woman called Grace Hopper who – along the way – single-handedly invented the idea of open source software too.

    The compiler evolved into COBOL – one of the first computer languages – and led to the distinction between hardware and software.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n04cm

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  2. Kevin Kelly: How AI can bring on a second Industrial Revolution

    "The actual path of a raindrop as it goes down the valley is unpredictable, but the general direction is inevitable," says digital visionary Kevin Kelly — and technology is much the same, driven by patterns that are surprising but inevitable. Over the next 20 years, he says, our penchant for making things smarter and smarter will have a profound impact on nearly everything we do. Kelly explores three trends in AI we need to understand in order to embrace it and steer its development. "The most popular AI product 20 years from now that everyone uses has not been invented yet," Kelly says. "That means that you’re not late."

    http://www.ted.com/talks/kevin_kelly_how_ai_can_bring_on_a_second_industrial_revolution

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  3. The Shipping Container

    The boom in global trade was caused by a simple steel box. Shipping goods around the world was – for many centuries – expensive, risky and time-consuming. But 60 years ago the trucking entrepreneur Malcolm McLean changed all that by selling the idea of container shipping to the US military. Against huge odds he managed to turn ‘containerisation’ from a seemingly impractical idea into a massive industry – one that slashed the cost of transporting goods internationally and provoked a boom in global trade.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04g1ddh

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  4. The History of the iPhone, On Its 10th Anniversary | Internet History Podcast

    “So… Three things: A widescreen iPod with touch controls. A revolutionary mobile phone. And a breakthrough internet communications device. An iPod… a phone… and an internet communicator… An iPod, a phone… are you getting it? These are not three separate devices. This is one device! And we are calling it iPhone.”

    —Steve Jobs, January 9, 2007

    Those words have become so famous in the history of technology that I imagine a large percentage of readers have them memorized. Ten years ago this Monday, January 9, Steve Jobs stood on stage and announced the iPhone to the world. It was the crowning achievement in the career of the greatest technologist of our time, the moment that the modern era of computing began.

    On the ten year anniversary of the birth of the iPhone, this is the story of that moment and the history of that device which can take a rightful place alongside the original Macintosh, the first IBM PC, the Apple I, the Altair 8800, the DEC PDP-8, the IBM System/360 and the ENIAC as one of most important machines to have brought computing into everyday life.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/01/the-history-of-the-iphone/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  5. Longform Podcast #189: Maciej Ceglowski

    “My natural contrarianism makes me want to see if I can do something long-term in an industry where everything either changes until it’s unrecognizable or gets sold or collapses. I like the idea of things on the web being persistent. And more basically, I reject this idea that everything has to be on a really short time scale just because it involves technology. We’ve had these computers around for a while now. It’s time we start treating them like everything else in our lives, where it kind of lives on the same time scale that we do and doesn’t completely fall off the end of the world every three or four years.”

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  6. BBC Radio 4 - Digital Human, Series 9, Work

    In the 1st of a new series Aleks Krotoski gets down to work. From micro-taskers paid pennies to be the janitors of our digital services to car drivers jumping on the Uber bandwagon.

    Aleks speaks to technology writer Kashmir Hill who spent a month as an invisible girlfriend writing loving texts to service subscribers for a few cents per message. This is just one example of ‘micro-tasking’ made famous by Amazon’s Mechanical Turk service. For Vili Lehdonvirta of the Oxford internet institute they’re examples of the hidden human effort going into services we would assume were automated. Its a new form of piece work undertaken by a causal workforce doing it where and when it suits them.

    This type of work treats you like part of a system managed by algorithms an artificial, artificial intelligence. In some senses this isn’t anything new as work historian Richard Donkin explains using the examples of the time and motion studies pioneered by Fredrick Winslow Taylor and later taken up by Henry Ford.

    What is new is that having an algorithm as a boss runs the risk of having only the appearance of freedom and flexibility. Its what attracts people to the so called gig economy, where tasks are farmed out by the app to a willing freelance workforce. Aleks hears both sides of that experience from two people who make their living off a digital platform; one by day and the other by night.

    So what promise do these new forms of digital work offer? Aleks discovers they have the potential to be both a race to the bottom for labour markets and usher in a new era for those currently unable to work.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b075pm43

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  7. MV15079MacVoices #15079: David Sparks Delivers New Field Guides on OmniFocus and Workflow

    David Sparks has published the latest editions to his Field Guide series, OminFocus Video Field Guide and Workflow Video Field Guide, but with a twist. These are video-only, giving extended length training on each application, showing what you can do with each and how you do it. David talks about why this format made the most sense in these cases, the changes in his MacSparkly life, and why he’s finally on video!

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85mkEZZ4gpU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  8. ‘Buttered someone to death’ with Mr Bingo | Unfinished Business

    The Unfinished Business schedule’s been a little, shall we say, up in the air, for the past few episodes. while I’ve been busy writing something. I do aim to get

    back to our routine and I’m sorry for the disruption. A few weeks ago I recorded a hilarious episode with artist, illustrator and rapper Mr. Bingo. It’s a very funny conversation, but we do swear a lot so if you’re easily offended by four letter words, this may not be the episode for you.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/117

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  9. Unfinished Business

    Andy Clarke and guests have plenty to talk about.

    http://www.unfinished.bz/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  10. The Web That Wasn’t

    Google Tech Talks October, 23 2007

    ABSTRACT

    For most of us who work on the Internet, the Web is all we have ever really known. It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without browsers, URLs and HTTP. But in the years leading up to Tim Berners-Lee’s world-changing invention, a few visionary information scientists were exploring alternative systems that often bore little resemblance to the Web as we know it today. In this presentation, author and information architect Alex Wright will explore the heritage of these almost-forgotten systems in search of promising ideas left by the historical wayside.

    The presentation will focus on the pioneering work of Paul Otlet, Vannevar Bush, and Doug Engelbart, forebears of the 1960s and 1970s like Ted Nelson, Andries van Dam, and the Xerox PARC team, and more recent forays like Brown’s Intermedia system. We’ll trace the heritage of these systems and the solutions they suggest to present day Web quandaries, in hopes of finding clues to the future in the recent technological past.

    Speaker: Alex Wright Alex Wright is an information architect at the New York Times and the author of Glut: Mastering Information Through the Ages. Previously, Alex has led projects for The Long Now Foundation, California Digital Library, Harvard University, IBM, Microsoft, Rollyo and Sun Microsystems, among others. …

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72nfrhXroo8&index=68

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

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