mrjoe / tags / history

Tagged with “history” (13)

  1. The Compiler—50 Things That Made the Modern Economy

    Installing Windows might take 5,000 years without the compiler, a remarkable innovation which made modern computing possible. Tim Harford tells a compelling story which has at its heart a pioneering woman called Grace Hopper who – along the way – single-handedly invented the idea of open source software too.

    The compiler evolved into COBOL – one of the first computer languages – and led to the distinction between hardware and software.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04n04cm

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  2. The Shipping Container

    The boom in global trade was caused by a simple steel box. Shipping goods around the world was – for many centuries – expensive, risky and time-consuming. But 60 years ago the trucking entrepreneur Malcolm McLean changed all that by selling the idea of container shipping to the US military. Against huge odds he managed to turn ‘containerisation’ from a seemingly impractical idea into a massive industry – one that slashed the cost of transporting goods internationally and provoked a boom in global trade.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p04g1ddh

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  3. The History of the iPhone, On Its 10th Anniversary | Internet History Podcast

    “So… Three things: A widescreen iPod with touch controls. A revolutionary mobile phone. And a breakthrough internet communications device. An iPod… a phone… and an internet communicator… An iPod, a phone… are you getting it? These are not three separate devices. This is one device! And we are calling it iPhone.”

    —Steve Jobs, January 9, 2007

    Those words have become so famous in the history of technology that I imagine a large percentage of readers have them memorized. Ten years ago this Monday, January 9, Steve Jobs stood on stage and announced the iPhone to the world. It was the crowning achievement in the career of the greatest technologist of our time, the moment that the modern era of computing began.

    On the ten year anniversary of the birth of the iPhone, this is the story of that moment and the history of that device which can take a rightful place alongside the original Macintosh, the first IBM PC, the Apple I, the Altair 8800, the DEC PDP-8, the IBM System/360 and the ENIAC as one of most important machines to have brought computing into everyday life.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/01/the-history-of-the-iphone/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  4. Episode 07 :: Revisionist History Podcast

    Listen to “Hallelujah” Episode 7 of The Revisionist History Podcast with Malcolm Gladwell.

    In 1984, Elvis Costello released what he would say later was his worst record: Goodbye Cruel World. Among the most discordant songs on the album was the forgettable “The Deportees Club.” But then, years later, Costello went back and re-recorded it as “Deportee,” and today it stands as one of his most sublime achievements.

    “Hallelujah” is about the role that time and iteration play in the production of genius, and how some of the most memorable works of art had modest and undistinguished births.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/07-hallelujah

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  5. 228- Making Up Ground

    Large portions of San Francisco, New York City, Boston, Seattle, Hong Kong and Marseilles were built on top of human made land. What is now Mumbai, India, was transformed by the British from a seven-island archipelago to one contiguous strip of land. The most extraordinary example of land reclamation and manufacture may be the Netherlands. As early as the 9th century A.D., the Dutch began building dykes and pumping systems to create new land in places that were actually below sea level. But the historic scale of land manufacture is minuscule compared to the rate at which it is taking place today.

    Making Up Ground

    Sponsors Squarespace Casper MailChimp

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  6. Chapter 6 – A History of Internet Porn | Internet History Podcast

    It’s commonly accepted that with any new medium or technological advance, sex and pornographic material can often be the catalyst that drives early adoption. Among the first things produced after the invention of the printing press were of course bibles; but along side the bibles there was ribald and bawdy poetry and stories. When photography was developed in the 18th century, photographic commerce was mostly about selling people portraits of themselves or their loved ones—at least, initially. What really kicked off an industry for photographs was the marketing of pictures of other people… in the nude. These pictures were largely marketed as artistic model studies for aspiring artists, but that does little to explain why they sold in the tens of millions. The Crimean war in the 1850s and the American Civil war in the 1860s really lit a fuse under this industry. Soldiers on the front lines carried pictures of their sweetheart in their pockets, but also pictures of these “model studies.”

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/01/history-of-internet-porn/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  7. Chapter 7, Part 2 – Amazon’s Dominance of eCommerce | Internet History Podcast

    It’s part two of our Amazon founding story. How did Amazon come to completely dominate e-commerce? How did Jeff Bezos’ “Get Big Fast” strategy evolve? How and why did Amazon become the quintessential “dot com” and dot-com-era stock? The answers are within. :)

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/04/amazons-dominance-of-ecommerce/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  8. Chapter 7, Part 4 – eBay Wins the Auction Wars | Internet History Podcast

    Part 2 of eBay’s founding story. How, why and when eBay became the undisputed king of the online auction space.

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2015/09/ebay-wins-the-auction-wars/

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  9. Cobol – Codes that changed the World

    Huffduffed from http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/r4codes

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

  10. The Web That Wasn’t

    Google Tech Talks October, 23 2007

    ABSTRACT

    For most of us who work on the Internet, the Web is all we have ever really known. It’s almost impossible to imagine a world without browsers, URLs and HTTP. But in the years leading up to Tim Berners-Lee’s world-changing invention, a few visionary information scientists were exploring alternative systems that often bore little resemblance to the Web as we know it today. In this presentation, author and information architect Alex Wright will explore the heritage of these almost-forgotten systems in search of promising ideas left by the historical wayside.

    The presentation will focus on the pioneering work of Paul Otlet, Vannevar Bush, and Doug Engelbart, forebears of the 1960s and 1970s like Ted Nelson, Andries van Dam, and the Xerox PARC team, and more recent forays like Brown’s Intermedia system. We’ll trace the heritage of these systems and the solutions they suggest to present day Web quandaries, in hopes of finding clues to the future in the recent technological past.

    Speaker: Alex Wright Alex Wright is an information architect at the New York Times and the author of Glut: Mastering Information Through the Ages. Previously, Alex has led projects for The Long Now Foundation, California Digital Library, Harvard University, IBM, Microsoft, Rollyo and Sun Microsystems, among others. …

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=72nfrhXroo8&index=68

    —Huffduffed by mrjoe

Page 1 of 2Older