mrhaste / Tom

There is one person in mrhaste’s collective.

Huffduffed (11)

  1. Ethan Marcotte – The How and Why of Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    More types of devices are accessing your web content everyday. Have you figured out how to accommodate them? Ethan Marcotte is leading the charge in this area, with his work on Responsive Design, which can help your content scale and adapt to new devices.

    Ethan’s methods use media queries, fluid grids and other CSS3 elements to create beautiful and adaptable designs across a variety of platforms. Recently, he discussed his techniques during a UIE Virtual Seminar, The How and Why of Responsive Design. Ethan and Adam Churchill address some questions from that seminar in this podcast.

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

  2. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

  3. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Brainpower

    Brian Christian relates his experiences in one of the most famous philosophical experiments ? the Turing Test. Sherry Turkle is fascinated by our interactions with machines, and talks about what she calls the mashup of online and offline lives. Michael Chorost thinks his cochlear implants make him a living example of man/machine integration. Neuroscientist Miguel Nikolelis talks about the possibility of upgrading our brains with computer chips.

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

  4. Professor Christopher Dye: Are Humans Still Evolving?

    Homo sapiens have been around for 250,000 years - surely long enough to have become fully evolved?

    It was thought that the dramatic extension of life spans during the 20th century eliminated natural selection, but new evidence shows that to be false.

    Will selection always be natural, or could postmodern also mean posthuman?

    http://fora.tv/2009/03/26/Professor_Christopher_Dye_Are_Humans_Still_Evolving

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

  5. Brian Greene: A Physicist Explains ‘The Hidden Reality’ Of Parallel Universes : NPR

    It is possible that there are many other universes that exist parallel to our universe. Theoretical physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe, explains how that’s possible in the new book, The Hidden Reality.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/24/132932268/a-physicist-explains-why-parallel-universes-may-exist?&sc=tumblr

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

  6. Why Not to Fear Black Holes with Astronomer Ian Morison

    Black Holes seem to have bad press that is largely undeserved. This lecture with professor Ian Morison explains what Black Holes are, and how we can discover them even through they can’t be seen.

    This program was recorded in collaboration with Gresham College, on October 27, 2010.

    Gresham Professor of Astronomy Ian Morison made his first telescope at the age of 12 with lenses given to him by his optician. Having studied Physics, Maths and Astronomy at Oxford, he became a radio astronomer at the Jodrell Bank Observatory and teaches Astronomy and Cosmology at the University of Manchester.

    Over 25 years he has also taught Observational Astronomy to many hundreds of adult students in the North West of England. An active amateur optical astronomer, he is a council member and past president of the Society for Popular Astronomy in the United Kingdom.

    At Jodrell Bank he was a designer of the 217 KM MERLIN array and has coordinated the Project Phoenix SETI Observations using the Lovell Radio Telescope. He contributes astronomy articles and reviews for New Scientist and Astronomy Now, and produces a monthly sky guide on the Observatory’s website.

    —Huffduffed by mrhaste

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