mot / Jack

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Huffduffed (11)

  1. The Wheeler Centre: Armando Iannucci in Conversation with Tony Martin — The Wheeler Centre

    Similar but not the same

     

    Podcast episode

    Armando Iannucci in Conversation with Annabel Crabb  /  Satire

    Armando Iannucci is the brilliant comedic mind behind Veep’s Selina Meyer, The Thick of It’s Malcolm Tucker and, in collaboration with Chris Morris on The Day Today, the irrepressible Alan Partridge. If you’re familiar with Iannucci’s work, you’ll know he’s also responsible for some of the most inventive swearing and bizarre black comedy ever broadcast in TV history.

    Yet this giant of British comedy – famous for his brand of caustic, sometimes surrealist, political satire – worries about the role of comedy in this era of post-truth, populist politics. ‘I now find the political landscape so alien and awful that it’s hard to match the waves of cynicism it transmits on its own,’ he wrote in the New Statesman last year.

    One of the running ideas in Iannucci’s work – from Alan Partridge to Selina Meyer – is the gap between puffed-up public image and paranoid private persona. Most recently, he’s been working on a feature film that might touch on these tensions again. It’s set in the Soviet Union in the 1950s and it’s called The Death of Stalin.

    In conversation with Tony Martin, Iannucci discusses the predicaments and possibilities of political satire today.

    Tony Martin and Armando Iannucci at Melbourne’s Comedy Theatre — Photo: Johnboy Davidson

    https://www.wheelercentre.com/broadcasts/podcasts/the-wheeler-centre/armando-iannucci-in-conversation-with-tony-martin

    —Huffduffed by mot

  2. The Wheeler Centre: Armando Iannucci in Conversation with Tony Martin — The Wheeler Centre

    Similar but not the same

     

    Podcast episode

    Armando Iannucci in Conversation with Annabel Crabb  /  Satire

    Armando Iannucci is the brilliant comedic mind behind Veep’s Selina Meyer, The Thick of It’s Malcolm Tucker and, in collaboration with Chris Morris on The Day Today, the irrepressible Alan Partridge. If you’re familiar with Iannucci’s work, you’ll know he’s also responsible for some of the most inventive swearing and bizarre black comedy ever broadcast in TV history.

    Yet this giant of British comedy – famous for his brand of caustic, sometimes surrealist, political satire – worries about the role of comedy in this era of post-truth, populist politics. ‘I now find the political landscape so alien and awful that it’s hard to match the waves of cynicism it transmits on its own,’ he wrote in the New Statesman last year.

    One of the running ideas in Iannucci’s work – from Alan Partridge to Selina Meyer – is the gap between puffed-up public image and paranoid private persona. Most recently, he’s been working on a feature film that might touch on these tensions again. It’s set in the Soviet Union in the 1950s and it’s called The Death of Stalin.

    In conversation with Tony Martin, Iannucci discusses the predicaments and possibilities of political satire today.

    Tony Martin and Armando Iannucci at Melbourne’s Comedy Theatre — Photo: Johnboy Davidson

    https://www.wheelercentre.com/broadcasts/podcasts/the-wheeler-centre/armando-iannucci-in-conversation-with-tony-martin

    —Huffduffed by mot

  3. Armando Iannucci in Conversation with Annabel Crabb — The Wheeler Centre

    Armando Iannucci is the brilliant comedic mind behind Veep’s Selina Meyer, The Thick of It’s Malcolm Tucker and, in collaboration with Chris Morris on The Day Today, the irrepressible Alan Partridge. If you’re familiar with Iannucci’s work, you’ll know he’s also responsible for some of the most inventive swearing and bizarre black comedy ever broadcast in TV history.

    Yet this giant of British comedy – famous for his brand of caustic, sometimes surrealist, political satire – worries about the role of comedy in this era of post-truth, populist politics. ‘I now find the political landscape so alien and awful that it’s hard to match the waves of cynicism it transmits on its own,’ he wrote in the New Statesman last year.

    One of the running ideas in Iannucci’s work – from Alan Partridge to Selina Meyer – is the gap between puffed-up public image and paranoid private persona. Most recently, he’s been working on a feature film that might touch on these tensions again. It’s set in the Soviet Union in the 1950s and it’s called The Death of Stalin.

    In conversation with Annabel Crabb, Iannucci discusses the predicaments and possibilities of political satire today.

    —Huffduffed by mot

  4. EP67 - Armando Iannucci - I’m not a political satirist! - Simon Caine

    00000

    Total run time: 1 hour 36 mins 44 secs.

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    Got a problem? Email me and I’ll try and solve it.

    About Armando Iannucci…

    Armando Iannucci (@aiannucci) is a Scottish satirist, writer, television director and radio producer. He’s best known for The Armando Iannucci Shows, The Day Today, Knowing Me, Knowing You, Veep and I’m Alan Partridge.  

    I got him on to talk about how he got started in radio, what it was like moving radio shows to TV and other visual mediums with no experience in them, how he picks the people he collaborates with, the draw backs of having a fanbase at his level and most interestingly, why he doesn’t like being labeled as a satirist.

    You Don’t forget! Once you’ve listened to the podcast remember to tweet him your suggestions for his new book title using the hashtag “#MITLE“.

    If you enjoyed this you might also like…

    EP 20 – Joe Lycett – How to get the right agent, promote a show and which comedy competitions are worth entering.

    EP 16 – Liz Miele – How to go viral and build an online fan base.

    EP 10 – Luisa Omielan – the story behind the sleeper-hit show “What Would Beyonce Do”.

    Previous Podcast

     

     

    EP66 – Helen Zaltzman – The history and future of podcasting.

     

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    http://simoncaine.co.uk/ATI/ArmandoIannucci

    —Huffduffed by mot

  5. Dan Harmon

    Comedian and repeat relationship failure, Erin McGathy talks love, sex and all matters of heartbreak in the podcast version of her live show originally performed at the Upright Citizen’s Brigade Theatre. Each week features a revealing, intimate and joyfully-terrible conversation with a different comedian friend, famous-ish person or drunk ex-boyfriend. Let’s get terrible.

    http://www.feralaudio.com/1-dan-harmon/

    —Huffduffed by mot

  6. This Feels Terrible - Steve Greene

    Comedian and repeat relationship failure, Erin McGathy talks love, sex and all matters of heartbreak in the podcast version of her live show originally performed at the Upright Citizen’s Brigade Theatre. Each week features a revealing, intimate and joyfully-terrible conversation with a different comedian friend, famous-ish person or drunk ex-boyfriend. Let’s get terrible.

    http://feralaudio.com/45-erins-ex-steve-greene/

    —Huffduffed by mot

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