mjmurphy / Michael Murphy

There are three people in mjmurphy’s collective.

Huffduffed (6)

  1. William Gibson - No Maps For These Territories (audio from documentary) Part2/2

    Audio taken form the documentary No Maps for These Territories - Part2

    Taken from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Maps_for_These_Territories

    No Maps for These Territories is an independent documentary film made by Mark Neale focusing on the speculative fiction author William Gibson.[1] It features appearances by Jack Womack, Bruce Sterling, Bono, and The Edge and was released by Docurama. The film had its world premiere at the Vancouver International Film Festival in October 2000.

    —Huffduffed by mjmurphy

  2. William Gibson - No Maps For These Territories (audio from documentary) Part1/2

    Audio taken form the documentary No Maps for These Territories - Part1

    Taken from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_Maps_for_These_Territories

    No Maps for These Territories is an independent documentary film made by Mark Neale focusing on the speculative fiction author William Gibson.[1] It features appearances by Jack Womack, Bruce Sterling, Bono, and The Edge and was released by Docurama. The film had its world premiere at the Vancouver International Film Festival in October 2000.

    —Huffduffed by mjmurphy

  3. Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

    As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions.

    In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form.

    Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five:

    • Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior.
    • Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions.
    • Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications.
    • Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization.
    • Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them.

    Christian then describes five practices:

    • Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves.
    • Create social objects that give people context for interaction.
    • Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders.
    • Enable a bridge to real life.
    • Let the community elevate people and the content they value.

    Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples:

    • The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful.
    • Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply.
    • The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene.
    • The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other.
    • The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally.

    Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works.

    http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html

    —Huffduffed by mjmurphy

  4. Josh Williams — Keynote: Where are we going?

    Today’s web is being defined more than ever by buzz words, catch phrases, fads and trends. Startups are being cre ated for star tups sake, stan dards are being hijacked by so-​​called “social media gurus,” and investors are pil ing on one after another look ing to hop on the next big wave. And we, the design ers, devel op ers and inno va tors actu ally build ing the web, are left to won der if we’re still in the dri vers seat.

    During this brisk dis cus sion we’ll sep a rate fads from the future, debate native apps ver sus the mobile web, take an hon est look at the hype behind geo-​​location, then take a step back to ask our selves where the web—and we ourselves—are going. Hold on, it’s going to be a wild ride!

    Josh Williams is CEO and co-founder of Gowalla, a mobile and Web service that gives people around the world a new way to communicate and express themselves through the everyday places and extraordinary settings they enjoy. Gowalla empowers everyone to capture and share their journey as they go while following the happenings of family and friends. Josh is responsible for building and growing the business while leading the product design team. Gowalla was launched in 2009 and is backed by notable investors including Greylock Partners, Alsop-Louie Partners, Founders Fund, and other prominent angel investors. Josh is a self-taught designer and artist who has been creating online for over 15 years. Josh loves mid-century modern design, architecture, skiing, snowboarding and longboarding. He lives in Austin, Texas with his wife and two young daughters.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/josh-williams-keynote-where-are-we-going/

    —Huffduffed by mjmurphy