misternizz / tags / science fiction

Tagged with “science fiction” (24)

  1. Born of Man and Woman, by Richard Matheson, read by Walter O’Hara

    Born of Man and Woman is not a pleasant story, as it depicts a child born a hideous monster in our eyes, kept chained in the cellar by his parents, where he is beaten and abused regularly. It is, however, a memorable one, written by one of my favorite writers in the short story form, Richard Matheson, who is perhaps more famous for his television work on the Twilight Zone and other famous shows. This is a story I read as a younger teenager— probably 13 or so, and I recall it being in one of those Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthologies edited by Robert Silverberg. It’s one of those stories that sticks with you.. Matheson paints a vivid picture of the unnamed child’s suffering by having him recount events in a broken journal form. At the end of the story, you have to ask yourself who the real monsters are.

    Third Point of Singularity: http://misternizz.wordpress.com Airy Persiflage: http://misternizz.podbean.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  2. Lemmings, by Richard Matheson, read by Walter O’Hara

    This is a very short story by Richard Matheson, a famous television writer and master of the short story form. Written as a parable about nuclear war (in 1953), it was not received well, and in some jurisdictions people actually wanted it banned. I rather like the darkly ironic tone and imagery of this short-short piece. I have always read it very differently from the author’s intent, and took the allegory as representing the madness of popular culture. Go figure!

    Third Point of Singularity (blog): http://misternizz.wordpress.com/ Airy Persiflage: http://misternizz.podbean.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  3. They Are Made Out of Meat, by Terry Bisson, read by Walter O’Hara

    A very short and amusing story that was published in OMNI magazine in April 1991, and was nominated for a Nebula that year.

    http://misternizz.podbean.com http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  4. The Best Christmas EVER by James Patrick Kelly, read by Walter O’Hara

    Hugo award short story from 2004. Excellent and seasonal creepy tale of the end of mankind.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  5. One Second Away.. by John L. French

    One Second Away.. by John L. French, Read by Walter O’Hara http://misternizz.podbean.com/ (Airy Persiflage) http://misternizz.wordpress.com (Third Point of Singularity)

    In One Second Away, the protagonist wrestles with the ethical dimensions of time travel and redemption, and arrives at a surprising, paradoxical conclusion.

    "One Second Away" first appeared in Startling Stories Winter 2010, published by Wildcat Books. Their website is http://www.wildcatbooks.net/. John L. French is a crime scene supervisor with the Baltimore Police Department Crime Laboratory. As a writer of crime, pulp and horror fiction his stories have appeared in Hardboiled, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, THE DEAD WALK, FLESH AND IRON and other anthologies. He was the consulting editor for Chelsea House’s CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS series for young adults. His latest book is HERE THERE BE MONSTERS, A Bianca Jones Collection. He is the editor of BAD COP, NO DONUT, Tales of Police Behaving Badly. All of John’s books are available on Amazon.com or direct from him (signed/inscribed copies) by emailing him at jfrenchfam@aol.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  6. How the Old World Died, by Harry Harrison, read by Walt O’Hara

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    Life in the world the Robots made.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  7. The Defenders - Philip K. Dick

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  8. audioto.me: The Skull by Philip K. Dick

    An early short story by legendary science fiction author Philip K. Dick. (http://2xrainbow.com/audiotome/category/podcast)

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  9. To The Best of Our Knowledge: Superheroes

    Batman, Superman, the Green Lantern… we all had our superheroes as kids. Maybe we still do today? In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, SUPERHEROES. We’ll celebrate Wonder Woman’s 70th birthday with a look at her controversial new costume. We’ll also explore the actual physics of superpowers. And, "The 99" – an Islamic comic book in which each superhero reflects one of the 99 names of Allah.

    SEGMENT 1: James Kakalios teaches physics at the University of Minnesota and is the author of "The Physics of Superheroes." He tells Jim Fleming that Superman’s powers make sense for a creature born on a planet with stronger gravity than Earth’s, and that often fantasy writers strive to be scientific if you grant them one impossible feat.

    SEGMENT 2: Wonder Woman is 70! Jim Lee drew the updated Wonder Woman and describes her to Steve Paulson, explaining the reasoning behind the updates. Jim Lee is co-publisher of DC comics. Also, Aimee Mullins is an athlete, fashion model and activist who uses whichever of her 12 pairs of prosthetic legs is appropriate for the task at hand. She talks with Anne Strainchamps about why her running legs are modeled on a cheetah’s and why she sees herself as having superpowers, rather than being "disabled."

    SEGMENT 3: Naif Al-Mutawa lives in his native Kuwait and is the Creator of "The 99," a comic book series featuring a group of superheroes each of whom derives a power from one of the 99 attributes of Allah. Al-Mutawa tells Steve Paulson that his Islamic superheroes are a response to President Obama’s Cairo speech, and that they may soon engage with the traditional Western superheroes.

    http://www.wpr.org/book/100905a.cfm

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  10. Confessions of a Crap Artist

    Philip K Dick is now world famous, thanks to films like Blade Runner, Total Recall and Minority Report. But in the last years of his life he encountered something so strange and troubling he couldn’t stop writing about it. Writer Ken Hollings asks: was it Phil’s fault God talked to him or was it God’s? Broadcast on Monday 16 January 2006, 20:30 on BBC Radio 4.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

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