Tagged with “ai” (10)

  1. Born of Man and Woman, by Richard Matheson, read by Walter O’Hara

    Born of Man and Woman is not a pleasant story, as it depicts a child born a hideous monster in our eyes, kept chained in the cellar by his parents, where he is beaten and abused regularly. It is, however, a memorable one, written by one of my favorite writers in the short story form, Richard Matheson, who is perhaps more famous for his television work on the Twilight Zone and other famous shows. This is a story I read as a younger teenager— probably 13 or so, and I recall it being in one of those Science Fiction Hall of Fame anthologies edited by Robert Silverberg. It’s one of those stories that sticks with you.. Matheson paints a vivid picture of the unnamed child’s suffering by having him recount events in a broken journal form. At the end of the story, you have to ask yourself who the real monsters are.

    Third Point of Singularity: http://misternizz.wordpress.com Airy Persiflage: http://misternizz.podbean.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  2. Lemmings, by Richard Matheson, read by Walter O’Hara

    This is a very short story by Richard Matheson, a famous television writer and master of the short story form. Written as a parable about nuclear war (in 1953), it was not received well, and in some jurisdictions people actually wanted it banned. I rather like the darkly ironic tone and imagery of this short-short piece. I have always read it very differently from the author’s intent, and took the allegory as representing the madness of popular culture. Go figure!

    Third Point of Singularity (blog): http://misternizz.wordpress.com/ Airy Persiflage: http://misternizz.podbean.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  3. Ambrose and Signor Ploppo, by Frank Key

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    A dialogue between Signor Ploppo, a man of parts, and Ambrose, a cunning and curd-hungry member of the avian family.

    Read by Walter O’Hara (Signor Ploppo) and Garrett O’Hara (Ambrose)

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  4. Professor Panini by Matthew Grigg

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    A cautionary tale of a duck, a toaster, and buttered bagels.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  5. One Second Away.. by John L. French

    One Second Away.. by John L. French, Read by Walter O’Hara http://misternizz.podbean.com/ (Airy Persiflage) http://misternizz.wordpress.com (Third Point of Singularity)

    In One Second Away, the protagonist wrestles with the ethical dimensions of time travel and redemption, and arrives at a surprising, paradoxical conclusion.

    "One Second Away" first appeared in Startling Stories Winter 2010, published by Wildcat Books. Their website is http://www.wildcatbooks.net/. John L. French is a crime scene supervisor with the Baltimore Police Department Crime Laboratory. As a writer of crime, pulp and horror fiction his stories have appeared in Hardboiled, Alfred Hitchcock’s Mystery Magazine, THE DEAD WALK, FLESH AND IRON and other anthologies. He was the consulting editor for Chelsea House’s CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS series for young adults. His latest book is HERE THERE BE MONSTERS, A Bianca Jones Collection. He is the editor of BAD COP, NO DONUT, Tales of Police Behaving Badly. All of John’s books are available on Amazon.com or direct from him (signed/inscribed copies) by emailing him at jfrenchfam@aol.com

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  6. How the Old World Died, by Harry Harrison, read by Walt O’Hara

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    Life in the world the Robots made.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  7. John and Abigal Adams Correspondence, Letter 001

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    The correspondence between John and Abigal Adams is astonishing for its length and historical value. They wrote to each other constantly during their long periods of separation and one can see an almost daily tide of events from their courtship in 1762 to the Presidency. Here I attempt to do an occasional read from the historical archive with the assistance of Julie Bellam.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  8. Hoofprint Advice, by Frank Key

    In this seemingly random diatribe, the Regime tunes in to give us some excellent tips on how to deal with the embarrassment of hoof-prints on your ceiling.

    http://misternizz.wordpress.com http://misternizz.podbean.com/

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  9. The War Prayer, by Mark Twain, read by Walter O’Hara

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    The War Prayer is my favorite shorter fiction piece by Mr. Mark Twain, aka Samuel Clemens, distinguished man of letters and literary giant of the 19th century. The War Prayer was written quite late in his life, circa 1905. The piece was written in protest of the American-Phillipine War, which Twain opposed, and did not see print in his lifetime. Biting and caustic, The War Prayer is as powerful today as it was when it was written. I hope I have done justice to it here.

    —Huffduffed by misternizz

  10. Robot Opera and Immortality

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2011/03/07/robot-opera

    In the new robot opera, “Death and the Powers,” humans are history. So is flesh and blood- as ‘so over’ as the dinosaurs.

    The high-tech drama, composed by Tod Machover, tells the story of how one eccentric billionaire led the way, by refusing to die. He uploads himself – his mind – into the realm of digital immortality, and leaves his worldly body behind. Machover, known as “America’s most wired composer” and director of the Opera of the Future group at the MIT Media Lab, thinks of his character Simon Powers, as “a combination of Howard Hughes, Walt Disney and Bill Gates,” who rather than wanting to live forever, desired “to leave the world, but leave everything about himself here.”

    —Huffduffed by misternizz