Tagged with “keynote” (6)

  1. Dude, you broke the Future!

    From https://media.ccc.de/v/34c3-9270-dude_you_broke_the_future

    We’re living in yesterday’s future, and it’s nothing like the speculations of our authors and film/TV producers. As a working science fiction novelist, I take a professional interest in how we get predictions about the future wrong, and why, so that I can avoid repeating the same mistakes. Science fiction is written by people embedded within a society with expectations and political assumptions that bias us towards looking at the shiny surface of new technologies rather than asking how human beings will use them, and to taking narratives of progress at face value rather than asking what hidden agenda they serve.

    In this talk, author Charles Stross will give a rambling, discursive, and angry tour of what went wrong with the 21st century, why we didn’t see it coming, where we can expect it to go next, and a few suggestions for what to do about it if we don’t like it.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

    —Huffduffed by jessewillis

  3. Cory Doctorow on intellectual property in a digital age

    In a keynote speech for The Literary Conference 2014, author and renowned digital publishing pioneer Cory Doctorow talks about his creative experiments on and offline, and addresses head-on the thorny question of ‘Intellectual Property in a Digital Age’.

    http://craphound.com/?p=5227

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Glenn Greenwald’s must-watch 30C3 keynote - Boing Boing

    Yesterday in Hamburg, Glenn Greenwald gave an astounding, must-watch keynote address to the gathered hackers at the 30th Chaos Communications Congress, or 30C3 (Greenwald starts at 4:36). Greenwald excoriated the press for failing to hold the world’s leaders to account, describing what he did with the Snoweden leaks as challenge to the journalistic status quo as well as the political status quo. This is a leaping-off point for an extended riff on the active cooperation between the press and the national security apparatus, an arrangement calculated to give the appearance of oversight on surveillance activities without any such oversight (for example, BBC reporter expressed shock when he said that the role of the press should be to root out lies from senior spies, saying that generals and senior officials would ever lie to the public).

    Greenwald draws a connection between private companies and spying, expressing hope that Internet giants will finally understand that their profitability is endangered by their collaboration with spies. He describes these companies as having "unparalleled power" to curb state spying.

    He exhorted the hackers at 30C3 to do their best to make the Internet as secure for its users as possible, saying that without their contributions, all is lost. He urges them to strike back at Silicon Valley intelligence collaborators like Palantir, who pose as hip and technie to attract bright young people to help with their mission to attack privacy.

    The whole speech is important; it praises Chelsea Manning, Wikileaks, and Daniel Ellsberg, as well as other brave whistelblowers, and said that the Snowden project built on their work. He said that the heavy-handed attacks on whistleblowers by the US government have only revealed the state’s corruption and inspired more insiders to go public.

    Notably, Greenwald revealed that the NSA and GCHQ are spying on in-flight Internet service, something that had not been revealed to date.

    The audio is already on Soundcloud, and I’ve extracted the audio as an MP3 and put it on the Internet Archive (MP3).

    http://boingboing.net/2013/12/28/glenn-greenwalds-must-watch.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Escalante by Matt Webb

    The opening keynote from Web Directions South 2009.

    The long run to the turn of the millennium got us preoccupied with conclusions. The Internet is finally taken for granted. The iPhone is finally ubiquitous computing come true. Let’s think not of ends, but dawns: it’s not that we’re on the home straight of ubicomp, but the beginning of a century of smart matter. It’s not about fixing the Web, but making a springboard for new economies, new ways of creating, and new cultures.

    The 21st century is a participatory culture, not a consumerist one. What does it mean when small teams can be responsible for world-size effects, on the same playing field as major corporations and government? We can look at the Web - breaking down publishing and consuming from day zero - for where we might be heading in a world bigger than we can really see, and we can look at design - playful and rational all at once - to help us figure out what to do when we get there.

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/matt-webb-opening-keynote-escalante/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Bruce Sterling at IDEA 2006

    The closing keynote from Bruce Sterling at the IDEA conference held in Seattle in 2006.

    From http://ideaconference.org/blog/?p=46

    —Huffduffed by adactio