misternizz / collective / tags / digital preservation

Tagged with “digital preservation” (51)

  1. Abby Smith Rumsey on Remembering, Forgetting, and When We Are No More - Econlib

    You might think your tweets on Twitter belong to you. But in 2010, the Library of Congress acquired the entire archive of Twitter. Why would such a majestic library acquire such seemingly ephemeral material? Historian Abby Smith Rumsey, author of When We Are No More, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about this decision of the Library of Congress and the general challenge of how to cope with a world when so much of what we write and read is digital. Subjects discussed include what we can learn from the past, the power of collective memory, what is worth saving, and how we might archive our electronic lives so that we and those who come after us can find what we might be looking for.

    http://www.econtalk.org/abby-smith-rumsey-on-remembering-forgetting-and-when-we-are-no-more/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Infinite Scroll

    Our distant ancestors often felt overloaded by information. (“Have you read Cicero’s latest speech?” “I don’t have time!”) Throughout history we’ve invented shortcuts like tables of contents, indexes, book reviews, and encyclopedias. What technological solutions might help us cope with the information overload we experience today? Guests include: Stewart Butterfield, CEO of Slack, and Nathan Jurgenson, Snapchat sociologist.

    https://slate.com/technology/2018/11/tools-to-manage-information-overload-tables-of-contents-indexes-encyclopedias-slack.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott

    Today, The Keepers continues with the launch of "Keeper of the Day," our new daily, year-long social media series featuring keepers from around the world. {Kind of like baseball cards}. Keeper of the Day will arrive in an array of modes—radio, podcasts, photographs, graphics, videos, quotes…. 

    Along with more stories of activist archivists, rogue librarians, curators, collectors and historians, we’ll be featuring keepers of all kinds—river keepers, seed keepers, climate keepers, peacekeepers—stewards of culture, civil liberties, the land, the free flow of information and ideas—people who take it upon themselves to preserve and protect.

    Keeper of the Day (#keeperoftheday) will appear on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, kitchensisters.org, emails, and beyond. We’ll be telling in a medley of mediums. Daily for a year. A keeper a day.

    We begin this wing of the series at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. Twas there we met him. 

    Keeper #1: The Free-Range Archivist: Jason Scott, the public facing mouth of the Internet Archive. Listen and you’ll see why. This story was produced by one of our mighty interns, Juliet Gelfman-Randazzo, in collaboration with The Kitchen Sisters. This is Juliet’s first story. She took the reins and we were knocked out by what she did. Jim …

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/kitchensisters/the-free-range-archivist-jason-scott
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 16 Oct 2018 22:20:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Setting the Record Straight by Going Wayback

    The public web is a fact checker’s dream, but not everything stays up forever. More than just an invaluable contribution to collective memory, the practice of web crawling, indexing and archiving empowers the research and journalism that is ultimately required to speak truth to power.

    Speaker: Mark Graham - Director, the Wayback Machine, The Internet Archive

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/onlinenewsassociation/setting-the-record-straight-by-going-wayback
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 08 Oct 2018 20:50:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Languages on the Brink – Can technology save our endangered languages?

    We can now record the world’s languages at an unprecedented rate, precisely at the moment they are most threatened. What does the future hold for language in the age of digital tech? At Melbourne Knowledge Week 2018, linguist and international guest of the festival Laura Welcher (The Long Now Foundation), Nick Thieberger (Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) and Paul Paton (First Languages Australia) get together to discuss the future of language preservation. Date recorded: 7/5/2018

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/knowledgemelbourne/languages-on-the-brink-can-technology-save-our-endangered-languages
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:22:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. The Far Future

    How do we prepare for the distant future? Helen Keen meets the people who try to.

    If our tech society continues then we can leave data for future generations in huge, mundane quantities, detailing our every tweet and Facebook ‘like’. But how long could this information be stored? And if society as we know it ends, will our achievements vanish with it? How do we plan for and protect those who will be our distant descendants and yet may have hopes, fears, languages, beliefs, even religions that we simply cannot predict? What if anything can we, should we, pass on?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05sxgvj

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Preventing A ‘Digital Dark Age’ Of Data

    More and more data is born into this world as digital bits, with no analog counterpart. But do we have enough backups to prevent a digital dark age? In our new “File Not Found” series, Science Friday‘s Lauren Young explores how archivists excavate data from aging computers, magnetic tapes, and the internet…and ponders the hypothetical data storage devices of the future, like diamonds and DNA.

    Lauren surveys the series, and Kari Kraus of the University of Maryland joins her to talk about techniques for preserving old video games and virtual reality experiences.

    https://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/preventing-a-digital-dark-age/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Jason Scott at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "The Web In An Eye Blink": A filmmaker, historian, and self-proclaimed rogue archivist, Jason Scott discusses his personal history of preserving the digital commons which began with rescuing his favorite BBS-era "text files" and continued with saving gigabytes of the first user-created homepages (i.e. GeoCities.com) which were about to be trashed by their corporate owner. Today his mission, in his role at the Internet Archive, is to save all the computer games and make them playable again inside modern web browsers. And that’s where things get really weird.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02015/feb/24/web-eye-blink

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Brian McCullough: History in the digital age

    Social media has changed the game for history, says Brian McCullough. Just think of all of the rich, first-hand data those posts and tweets and photos will provide to future historians.

    Brian McCullough is creator of the Internet History Podcast, an oral history of the internet and its key players. Now an expert on this largely unchronicled time period, Brian is currently writing an actual book on the subject: How the Internet Happened, due to be published in fall 2017 by Liveright/WW Norton.

    The TED Residency program is an incubator for breakthrough ideas. It is free and open to all via a semi-annual competitive application. Those chosen as TED Residents spend four months at TED headquarters in New York City, working on their idea. Selection criteria include the strength of their idea, their character, and their ability to bring a fresh perspective and positive contribution to the diverse TED community.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWI3WdRo5DA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 03 May 2017 00:14:15 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle on Recode Decode - Recode

    On this episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher, entrepreneur, activist and founder of the Internet Archive Brewster Kahle discussed the growth of the open internet and the importance of having a history of the internet available to everyone.

    The Internet Archive’s historical search engine, the "Wayback Machine," grows by half a billion pages a week.

    http://www.recode.net/2017/3/8/14843408/transcript-internet-archive-founder-brewster-kahle-wayback-machine-recode-decode

    —Huffduffed by adactio

Page 1 of 6Older