Tagged with “2017roundup” (13)

  1. Song Exploder | R.E.M.

    Michael Stipe and Mike Mills of R.E.M. break down "Try Not to Breathe" from their seminal album Automatic for the People.

    http://songexploder.net/rem

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Feet on the Ground, Eyes on the Stars: The True Story of a Real Rocket Man with G.A. “Jim” Ogle – User Defenders podcast : Inspiring Interviews with UX Superheroes.

    G.A. “Jim” Ogle fell in love with airplanes at the early age of 8 years old. The circumstances that presented this initial passion were far from ideal.

    He was recovering in a hospital bed following a 7-hour surgery to essentially re-attach his badly mangled right leg from a horrible school bus wreck. He awoke from the operation to see a model airplane hanging down from a wooden structure over his bed that was to be used as a traction device to slowly pull his left leg back into place. It was broken at the hip and rammed almost three inches into his lower torso.

    His injuries would prevent him from being a pilot in the Air Force. But this reality would not deter him from being in the air with airplanes because 12 years later he became involved in space with missiles and rockets on his first job at Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1958. This was the beginning of his 51-year career of being associated with every manned moon mission and all 135 Space Shuttle missions. He finally got his layoff notice along with 8,000 other space workers following the final Shuttle mission, STS-135, in July 2011.

    He likes to tell folks questioning his unusual longevity in this field that he was fortunate to be “in the right place at the right time and the right age.” He considers himself blessed for having had the opportunity to be a part of this truly exciting time in America’s beginnings in space.

    Fun fact: Jim requires 10 lemons and multiple servings of tartar sauce with every seafood meal. The last lemon squeeze after the meal is used to clean his hands!

    https://userdefenders.com/podcast/feet-on-the-ground-eyes-on-the-stars-the-true-story-of-a-real-rocket-man-with-g-a-jim-ogle/

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  3. The King of Tears

    Revisionist History goes to Nashville to talk with Bobby Braddock, who has written more sad songs than almost anyone else. What is it about music that makes us cry? And what sets country music apart?

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/16-the-king-of-tears

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. #102 Long Distance

    This week, a telephone scammer makes a terrible mistake. He calls Alex Goldman.

    https://gimletmedia.com/episode/long-distance/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Patterns Day: Paul Lloyd

    Paul Lloyd speaking at Patterns Day in Brighton on June 30, 2017.

    A one-day event for web designers and developers on design systems, pattern libraries, style guides, and components.

    Patterns Day is brought to you by Clearleft.

    https://patternsday.com/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. Ep. #323: Nick Cave and Warren Ellis | Kreative Kontrol

    Nick Cave and Warren Ellis are two of the world’s most iconic, influential, and inspiring musicians working today. Originally from Australia, Nick Cave has altered the course of rock ‘n’ roll and invented a new kind of leading man in bands like the Birthday Party and Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. His countryman Warren Ellis is a gifted and daring multi-instrumentalist, renowned for his work in Dirty Three and he joined Cave, as a member of the Bad Seeds, in the mid-1990s. The pair have become close collaborators in the Bad Seeds, they worked together in a a now defunct band called Grinderman, and together they’ve also composed riveting and acclaimed scores and soundtracks for theatrical productions and films like The Proposition, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, The Road, Hell or High Water, and most recently, the feature films War Machine and Django. Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds dispatched a well-received album called Skeleton Tree in the fall of 2016 and in May of 2017, Mute Records released a comprehensive retrospective called Lovely Creatures: The Best of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds (1984-2014), and they’ve been touring behind these efforts lately. Captured in a hotel restaurant on the afternoon of their second sold out show at Massey Hall in Toronto, here Warren and Nick discuss their history as friends and colleagues, how Warren wound up in the Bad Seeds, how they work together and their relationships to melody and noise, Nick’s unique relationship with his audience and why he needs them now, recording Skeleton Tree, upcoming plans, and much more. Sponsored by Pizza Trokadero, the Bookshelf, and Planet Bean Coffee.

    http://vishkhanna.com/2017/06/06/ep-323-nick-cave-and-warren-ellis/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. EP.38 - Brian Eno, Part Two

    The second of two rambly conversations with artist, musician, producer and polymath, Brian Eno.

    https://www.acast.com/adambuxton/ep.38-brianenoparttwo

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  9. EP.37 - Brian Eno, Part One

    The first of two rambly conversations with artist, musician, producer and polymath, Brian Eno.

    https://www.acast.com/adambuxton/ep.37-brianenopartone

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Episode 03-Every Tuesday at Nine | shannonheatonmusic.com

    It’s Springtime in Boston. And this month’s episode is a fresh invitation to connect with people, and emerge from Winter!

    John Williams and Amy Shoemaker

    I chat with Tina Lech in Boston, John Williams in Chicago, Eoin O’Neill in Clare, and Brian Conway in White Plains, NY about the sessions they lead. I learn how each player runs these distinct weekly music gatherings–and what Irish music means to them, and the listeners who come each week.

    And trust me: whether you already play the accordion, or you’ve never been to an Irish session in your life, the story here goes way beyond a few tunes in a pub.

    I hope you’ll join me as I try to decode what sessions are all about. My conversations with the session leaders–and with Boston producer Brian O’Donovan, fiddle teacher Laurel Martin, and flute players Melissa Foster and Scott Boag opened my mind and my heart. There’s plenty of music heres, too.

    http://shannonheatonmusic.com/episode-03-every-tuesday-at-nine/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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