michele / tags / psychology

Tagged with “psychology” (22)

  1. Why It’s Hard to Admit to Being Wrong

    We all have a hard time admitting that we’re wrong, but according to a new book about human psychology, it’s not entirely our fault. Social psychologist Elliot Aronson says our brains work hard to make us think we are doing the right thing, even in the face of sometimes overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

    Elliot Aronson, co-author, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me); social psychologist; professor emeritus, psychology, University of California Santa Cruz.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12125926

    —Huffduffed by michele

  2. TWiST #30 with Annie Duke

    This Week in Startups professional poker player Annie Duke

    —Huffduffed by michele

  3. TWiST #21 with Mark Goulston

    This Week in Startups little different format from most episodes. Maybe my personal favorite. Mark Goulston author of Just Listen

    —Huffduffed by michele

  4. Happiness around the World: the paradox of happy peasants and miserable millionaires

    The determinants of happiness are remarkably similar around the world, in countries as different as Afghanistan, the U.S, and Chile. Income matters to happiness but only so much; friends, freedom, and employment are good for happiness, while crime, poor health, and divorce are bad. Paradoxically, however, people in places like Afghanistan can be as happy as those in much wealthier and safer ones like Chile. One explanation is the remarkable human capacity to adapt to adversity and hardship. While adaptation may be a good thing for individual wellbeing, it can also result in collective tolerance for bad equilibrium which are difficult for societies to escape from.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  5. Jennifer Michael Hecht - The Happiness Myth

    May 25 2007 - Jennifer talks with D.J. Grothe about the history of the idea of happiness.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  6. The Art and Science of Seductive Interactions — Stephen Anderson

    Remember that “percentage complete” feature that LinkedIn implemented a few years ago, and how quickly this accelerated people filling out their profiles? It wasn’t a clever interface, IA, or technical prowess that made this a successful feature—it was basic human psychology. To be good UX professionals we need to crack open some psych 101 textbooks, learn what motivates people, and then bake these ideas into our designs.

    Independent consultant Stephen P. Anderson looks at specific examples of sites who’ve designed serendipity, arousal, rewards and other seductive elements into their application, especially during the post sign-up process when it is so easy to lose people. Regardless of your current project, the principles behind these examples (from disciplines like social sciences, psychology, neuroscience and cognitive science) can be applied universally. Best of all, attendees will receive a special gift that makes it easy to bridge theory with tomorrow’s deadline.

    http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/idea-2009-day-2

    —Huffduffed by michele

  7. How to Control and Change Individual Behaviour: the world as installation

    Changing individual behavior is a major stake for policies and management, but humans think and act as social beings rather than rational agents. The lecture will introduce Installation Theory, the principles of which can be used for governance. Saadi Lahlou is director of the Institute of Social Psychology at LSE.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  8. Gene Koo & Scott Seider on Video Games and Pro-Social Learning

    Do video games cause aggressive tendencies and other negative behaviors? How can games create positive impacts on players and society? Could My.BarackObama.com really be considered “the most influential ‘video game’” in recent history? Gene Koo of the Berkman Center and Scott Seider of Boston University tackle a few of these fascinating questions.

    http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/mediaberkman/2009/05/20/gene-koo-scott-seider-on-video-games-and-pro-social-learning/

    —Huffduffed by michele

  9. Bruce M. Hood - Supersense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable

    http://www.pointofinquiry.org/bruce_m._hood_supersense_why_we_believe_in_the_unbelievable/

    Bruce M. Hood is chair of the Cognitive Development Center in the Experimental Psychology Department at the University of Bristol. He was a research fellow at Cambridge and has been a visiting scientist at MIT and professor at Harvard. Hood has received many awards for his work in child development and cognitive neuroscience. His newest book is Supersense: Why We Believe in the Unbelievable.

    In this discussion with D.J. Grothe, Bruce M. Hood explains how his agenda is different than the common skeptical agenda to disprove supernatural claims, and instead is an attempt to explain why people believe hold such beliefs in the first place. He argues that everyone is born with a "supersense," an instinct to believe in unseen forces and to recognize patterns and infer their causation, citing examples such as seeing Jesus in a grilled cheese sandwich, or the case of the "haunted scrotum." He explains how this supersense is universal, and that even skeptics and rationalists often exhibit it in their lives through rituals and the owning certain valued possessions, such as Richard Dawkins’ prizing of objects once owned by Charles Darwin or MIT growing saplings from the tree under which Newton first discovered the laws of gravity. He details how rituals give a perceived sense of control to believers, and how they may actually affect a believer’s performance. He talks about the "secular supernatural," contrasting it with the "religious supernatural." He argues against Daniel Dennett’s and Richard Dawkins’s thesis that religious belief results primarily from indoctrination in childhood. And he defends the position that unbelievable beliefs serve important social functions.

    —Huffduffed by michele

  10. NYPL: Adam Gopnik with Steven Pinker - How Far Can Darwin Take Us?

    Adam Gopnik, author of Angels & Ages, A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln and Modern Life and Steven Pinker, author of The Blank Slate and many other works, will discuss a fundamental question: How far can Darwin take us as a guide to why we are the way we are?

    Both outspoken appreciators of Darwin, Adam Gopnik and Steven Pinker will compare their visions—perhaps complementary, perhaps contrasting—of what Darwin’s legacy is on the two hundredth anniversary of his birth.

    http://www.nypl.org/research/chss/pep/pepdesc.cfm?id=5219

    —Huffduffed by michele

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