michele / tags / physics

Tagged with “physics” (3)

  1. Dark Secrets: What Science Tells Us About the Hidden Universe

    No mystery is bigger than dark energy - the elusive force that makes up three-quarters of the Universe and is causing it to expand at an accelerating rate. Join a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who use phenomena such as exploding stars and gravitational lenses to explore the dark cosmos.

    http://www.uctv.tv/search-details.aspx?showID=17426&subject=pet

    —Huffduffed by michele

  2. The Guardian’s Science Weekly podcast: The man behind the Large Hadron Collider

    Alok Jha and Ian Sample talk to Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn-Smith, who was instrumental in the creation of the Large Hadron Collider

    Our own science correspondent Ian Sample has written a book about the LHC’s quest for the Higgs boson, Massive: The Hunt for the God Particle. He was happy to tell us all about it.

    Producer Andy visited the new Skin exhibition at London’s Wellcome Collection, where he got to wear a "social condom".

    We also highlight an experiment in science journalism we are carrying out on our website. Story Tracker. It might just revolutionise the way we cover major science stories.

    Finally, next weekend is Science Hack Weekend: Get Excited and Make Things with Science! at the Guardian’s offices in King’s Cross, London. Bring your own bunsen burner. (Actually, don’t.)

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2010/jun/14/science-weekly-podcast-chris-llewellyn-smith-cern-fusion

    —Huffduffed by michele

  3. Angels and Demons Lecture Night - Hollywood Goes to ATLAS

    http://uslhc.us/Angels_Demons/schedule-videos.html

    May 21, 2009 Carleton University Louise Heelan

    This May will see the world premiere of Angels & Demons, an action-packed thriller based on Dan Brown’s best-selling novel that focuses on an apparent plot to destroy the Vatican using a small amount of antimatter. In the book and the movie, that antimatter is made using the Large Hadron Collider and is stolen from the European particle physics laboratory CERN. Parts of the movie were actually filmed at CERN. It’s not every day that a major motion picture places particle physics in the spotlight, especially one starring Tom Hanks and directed by Ron Howard. Through a series of public lectures, the particle physics community is using this opportunity to tell the world about the real science of antimatter, the Large Hadron Collider and the excitement of particle physics research.

    —Huffduffed by michele