The Future of Science Fiction | To the Best of Our Knowledge

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  1. Future Tense: Science Fiction

    Russian/American scientist and author, Isaac Asimov, once wrote: Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today — but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all.

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  2. Festival Book Club - Patrick Gale and Salley Vickers - ABC Perth - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

    Patrick Gale and Salley Vickers talk about turning heartache into an opportunity for writing good fiction at the 2010 Perth Writers Festival.

    —Huffduffed by ct5821

  3. How Ray Bradbury Changed The World

    How the amazing Ray Bradbury changed science fiction, literature, and the world.

    Sam Weller, professor of fiction writing at Columbia College in Chicago. He’s the co-editor of the upcoming anthology Shadow Show: All-New Stories in Celebration of Ray Bradbury.

    Gary Wolfe, award-winning science fiction editor, critic, and biographer. Professor of humanities at Roosevelt University.

    http://onpoint.wbur.org/2012/06/08/how-ray-bradbury

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  4. Future Sci-Fi - RN Future Tense - 27 January 2011

    Russian/American scientist and author, Isaac Asimov, once wrote: Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today — but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all.

    Now, there’s no denying science fiction has long been a popular genre — from print to television to film. But does it have the influence it once had?

    Some argue the exponential rate of technological change makes sci-fi less effective in its ability to predict, inspire and shape the future of the real world.

    Here at Future Tense we’re starting the year with a look at the power of science fiction.

    —Huffduffed by imsmi

  5. Digging up the Past - ABC Perth - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

    Judith Lanigan and Linda Jaivin describe how they turned history research into thrilling fiction in their respective novels.

    —Huffduffed by ct5821

  6. No Warp Drives, No Transporters: Science Fiction Authors Get Real : NPR

    Some of the biggest names in science fiction right now — like The Martian author Andy Weir — are writing what’s called hard sci-fi, based on real-world science and a vision of hope for the future.

    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/13/459392474/no-warp-drives-no-transporters-science-fiction-authors-get-real

    —Huffduffed by fordnr579

  7. Did science fiction predict the future of journalism?

    What’s the future of journalism? Amidst countless conferences, anxious op-eds and much hand-wringing, journalist Loren Ghiglione believes he might have found some answers in an unlikely place: science fiction. Despite his initial disdain for the genre, Ghiglione explains to Brooke that sci-fi is full of predictions that we’d be wise to consider.

    http://www.onthemedia.org/story/did-science-fiction-predict-future-journalism/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. This isn’t your grandfather’s science fiction | MetaFilter

    A simple time machine undermines the concept of free will, with disastrous consequences.

    —Huffduffed by fjordaan

  9. The Guardian Books Podcast: Looking ahead in science fiction

    Science fiction is the marmite of literature – people tend to love it or hate it. Yet no one could deny that it has produced many of the great myths of our age, from Frankenstein’s monster to William Gibson’s cyber-reality.

    SF blogger Damien Walter joins our panellists to discuss where it is now, and why we should all tune in to a genre that can be satirical, prophetic, political and plain good fun, often all at the same time. He also outlines some of the titles to look out for in 2010.

    We also look at John Wyndham’s previously unpublished novel, Plan for Chaos, and interview China Miéville, rising star of the "new weird".

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/audio/2010/jan/14/science-fiction-books-podcast

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  10. The Fork: Science Fiction versus Mundane Culture

    Neal Stephenson delivers a talk on Science Fiction as a Genre at Gresham College. Four professors discuss the origins of science fiction, its overlap with other genres and its developments over more than a century.

    —Huffduffed by adactio