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mattthinks / Matt

There are no people in mattthinks’s collective.

Huffduffed (55)

  1. HTML5 – Moving from hacks to Solutions

    Christian Heilmanns talk on innovating the web using HTML5

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  2. Cure for the Common Font — A Web Designer’s Introduction to Typeface Selection

    Now that web designers suddenly face the challenge (and delight) of choosing fonts from an ever-growing selection, we thought it’s a good time to recommend some basic principles for making wise type choices.

    • Stephen Coles
    • Jason Santa Maria
    • Tiffany Wardle
    • Frank Chimero

    http://typographica.org/2011/on-typography/intro-to-typeface-selection/

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  3. Boagworld: My thinking about the mobile web and universal design

    An Audioboo by Boagworld.

    http://audioboo.fm/boos/309754-my-thinking-about-the-mobile-web-and-universal-design

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  4. Ethan Marcotte – The How and Why of Responsive Web Design » UIE Brain Sparks

    Ethan’s methods use media queries, fluid grids and other CSS3 elements to create beautiful and adaptable designs across a variety of platforms. Recently, he discussed his techniques during a UIE Virtual Seminar, The How and Why of Responsive Design. Ethan and Adam Churchill address some questions from that seminar in this podcast.

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  5. Particle Pings: Sounds Of The Large Hadron Collider : NPR

    Deep beneath the border of France and Switzerland, the world’s most massive physics machine is sending subatomic particles smashing into each other at speeds nearing the speed of light. Physicists working with the 17-mile-long Large Hadron Collider hope it will help solve some of the universe’s mysteries.

    But first, researchers must overcome two very mundane hurdles: how to handle all of the data the LHC generates, and how to get non-scientists to care.

    One physicist has a novel way to solve both problems: sound.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/02/132415764/particle-pings-sounds-of-the-large-hadron-collider

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  6. Paul Davies | The Eerie Silence: Renewing Our Search for Alien Intelligence

    The acclaimed British-born theoretical physicist, cosmologist, and astrobiologist Paul Davies is the director of the Beyond Center for Fundamental Concepts in Science and co-director of the Cosmology Initiative, both at Arizona State University. He is also a member of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence’s (SETI) post-detection committee. Among his numerous scientific distinctions, Davies is a recipient of the prestigious Templeton Prize for his work on science and religion. His writings include the bestsellers The Mind of God, About Time, How to Build a Time Machine, The Fifth Miracle, and The Goldilocks Enigma. In his provocative new book, Davies challenges existing ideas of what form an alien intelligence might take, how it might try to communicate with us, and how we should respond if we ever do make contact. Free Library Festival (recorded 4/17/2010)

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  7. Richard Dawkins in conversation with Richard Fidler

    Scientist, Darwinian and atheist Richard Dawkins has written many books. They very quickly hit the bestseller list, thanks to his ability to translate complex scientific ideas into language the general reader can understand, without doing any violence to the science itself. His latest book The Greatest Show on Earth is his presentation of the evidence of evolution, from palaentology and embryology to genetics and geography.

    From http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2010/03/04/2836518.htm

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  8. Stephen Hawking talks to Brian Cox

    He tries not to think too much in the morning, but by night the problems of the universe keep Stephen Hawking awake. Fellow physicist Brian Cox asks him about the big issues facing science.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/audio/2010/sep/11/hawking-physics-cox

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  9. Information Is Beautiful

    In an age of high-speed living and info overload, visualized information has incredible potential to help us quickly understand, navigate and find meaning in a complex world.

    The use of infographics, data visualisations and information design is a rising trend across many disciplines: science, design, journalism and web. At the same time, daily exposure to the web is creating a incredibly design-literate population. Could this be a new language?

    In his session, David will share his passion for this merging of design, information, text and story to unveil some of the interesting, unexpected and sometimes magical things that happen when you visualise data, knowledge and ideas. And, admitting that his book is as full of mistakes as it is successes, he’ll also explore some of the common pitfalls, traps and FAILS that dog this young design form.

    Using examples from his book and blog, he’ll share thoughts on what makes a successful information visualisation and journalistic tips, especially for designers, on how to zero in on interesting data and subjects—and how designing information can expose your own biases and change your views about the world. Oh yeah!

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/david-mccandless

    David McCandless is a London-based author, data-journalist and information designer, working across print, advertising, TV and web. His design work has appeared in over forty publications internationally including The Guardian and Wired. He champions the use of data visualisations to explore new directions for journalism and to discover new stories in the seas of data surrounding us. His blog and book ‘Information Is Beautiful’ are dedicated to visualising ideas, issues, knowledge and data—all with the minimum of text.

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

  10. The Auteur Theory Of Design

    Why is it that some projects never rise to the level of the talent of those who made it? It’s oft said regarding good work that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. But sometimes the whole is less than the sum of its parts—a company or team comprised of good people, but yet which produces work that isn’t good.

    In his session, John will explain his theory to explain how this happens—in both directions—based on the longstanding collaborative art of filmmaking. Learn how to recognise when a project is doomed to mediocrity, and, more importantly, how best to achieve collaborative success.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/john-gruber

    John Gruber writes and publishes Daring Fireball, a somewhat popular weblog ostensibly focused on Mac and web nerdery. He has been producing Daring Fireball as a full-time endeavour since April 2006.

    He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and son.

    —Huffduffed by mattthinks

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