Tagged with “music” (429)

  1. UCDScholarcast - Scholarcast 61: Style and context -Traditional Irish Harping

    Abstract

    This Scholarcast is an extract from Helen Lawlor’s book, Irish Harping: 1900-2010 (Four Courts Press, 2012). This study provides a musical ethnography and a history of the Irish harp. It gives a socio-cultural and musical analysis of the music and song associated with all Irish harp styles, including traditional style, song to harp accompaniment, art-music style and the early Irish harp revival. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Irish harp had a limited presence in Ireland, but over the course of that century the harp experienced a significant revival with the subsequent emergence of numerous styles. Issues of transmission, gender studies and identity are also examined in this book. The Irish harp is now firmly located in the musical life of Ireland, in art music, traditional music and early music. Its present state is conditioned by its history in the 20th century. This book presents and analyses both of these perspectives in relation to the Irish harping tradition.

    Helen Lawlor

    Dr Helen Lawlor is a musician and academic, specialising in Irish harping. She lectures ethnomusicology, music education and Irish music at Dundalk Institute of Technology. Helen holds a PhD from UCD, an MA in Musicology (UCD) and a Bachelor in Music Education (TCD). She is contributor to and co-editor with Sandra Joyce of Harp Studies, Perspectives on the Irish Harp (Four Courts Press, 2016). In 2012 Helen published her research on the harp tradition in a monograph entitled Irish Harping 1900-2010 (Four Courts Press).  She has also contributed articles to the Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland, The Companion to Irish Traditional Music, Ancestral Imprints and Sonus. She has given guest lectures at Harvard University, the New England Conservatory, the American Irish Historical Society, the Royal Scottish Conservatoire.

    http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/scholarcast61.html

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  2. UCDScholarcast - Scholarcast 26: Perspectives on Popular Music in Ireland from the 1960s to the mid-1970s

    Abstract

    In this Scholarcast Paul Brady reflects on his early childhood encounters with music and on the importance of popular music in the 1960s to the formation of his own musical consciousness.  He recounts his earliest experiences playing with various  R ‘n’ B bands during his time as a student at UCD. In 1967 Brady joined The Johnstons whose combination of traditional Irish music with newer trends in folk music brought international success. Having distinguished himself as one of the most talented singers and accompanists of his generation he was invited by piper Liam O’Flynn to join Planxty in 1974.  Although deeply committed to traditional music, Brady stresses the importance of individual musical vision and the constant need for renewal and innovation.

    Paul Brady

    Paul Brady is one of Ireland’s leading singer-songwriters.  During his early career he was a member of several innovative folk and traditional bands including The Johnstons and Planxty. In 1976 he collaborated with Andy Irvine to produce a landmark album in Irish traditional music (Andy Irvine and Paul Brady).  He began a solo career in the late 1970s and his first solo album, Welcome Here Kind Stranger, was awarded the Melody Maker Folk Album of the Year. In the early 1980s Brady turned towards pop and rock music, and distinguished himself as a talented songwriter with albums such as Hard Station, True For You (1983), Back to the Centre (1985), Primitive Dance (1987). Other acclaimed albums include, Trick or Treat (1991), Spirits Colliding (1995), Oh What a World (2000), The Liberty Tapes(2002), Say What You Feel (2005) and Hooba Dooba (2010).

    http://www.ucd.ie/scholarcast/scholarcast26.html

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  3. Andrew Carnegie Lecture Series – Brian Eno

    The third annual Andrew Carnegie Lecture at Edinburgh College of Art was delivered by influential musician and producer Brian Eno.

    The celebrated artist discussed his life and career during a public lecture and at the University of Edinburgh’s George Square Lecture Theatre on 10th May 2016.

    Along with his public lecture, the renowned artist also took part in a number of workshops and seminars with students and staff from a variety of programmes at ECA.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0qATeJcL1XQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 09 May 2018 14:03:11 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  4. A Salute to Irish Music with Martin Hayes | Connecticut Public Radio

    The musician Christy Moore said Ireland could never have the equivalent of a folk revival because it never let its traditions lapse. And that’s very true.

    http://wnpr.org/post/salute-irish-music-martin-hayes

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  5. The Roots Of Van Morrison’s ‘Astral Weeks’ | Here & Now

    This fall marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the album, regarded as one of the most original-sounding and important of the rock era.

    http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2018/03/29/van-morrison-astral-weeks

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  6. Song Exploder | Stranger Things

    Composers Kyle Dixon & Michael Stein break down the opening theme to Stranger Things.

    http://songexploder.net/stranger-things

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  7. Take Me On: The Art Of The Cover Song - 1A

    What makes a great cover song?

    Is it a total reimagining, like Devo singing “Satisfaction,” Ike and Tina Turner taking on “Proud Mary” or Jimi Hendrix playing “All Along The Watchtower?”

    Is it a performance that brings a new energy or feeling to the original, like Earth, Wind and Fire’s “Got To Get You Into My Life” or Jeff Buckley’s “Hallelujah?”

    Or can a covering artist bring a weight to a song that makes it feel all their own, like Johnny Cash singing “Hurt?”

    The answer is yes.

    While taking on another artist’s hit can seem like an easy way to please fans, it can also be a risk. Covering a song invites a comparison to the original. When done right, it’s a beautiful tribute that can become a hit all its own. When done wrong, it can be the pop equivalent of dancing on a grave.

    Turn up your headphones and get ready for a music-filled examination of the art and craft of the cover.

    https://the1a.org/shows/2018-01-18/take-me-on-the-art-of-the-cover-song

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  8. Episode 1: New Day Rising from Do You Remember? A podcast about Hüsker Dü on RadioPublic

    In the first of this illuminating five-part history of the great Twin Cities punks Husker Du, we meet the band before they became a band, following Grant Hart and Greg Norton as they grow up in St. Paul, and then encounter Bob Mould, a new kid at Macalester College with a Flying V guitar and a love for punk rock equal to theirs.

    https://play.radiopublic.com/do-you-remember-a-podcast-about-hsker-d-GmpV5n/ep/s1!80d781e4f527437c949ca737fb4a2b015efc3673

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  9. Heat Rocks EP17: Vernon Reid on Jimi Hendrix’s “Band of Gypsys” (1970) | Maximum Fun

    Vernon Reid is one of rock’s greatest guitarists, having rising to stardom in the 1980s as a member of Living Colour. It’s not surprising, therefore, that he’d choose an album by one of rock’s other great guitarists: Jimi Hendrix and his final album, Band of Gypsys, recorded live at the Fillmore East and released in the spring of 1970. Reid gave us an amazing lesson into what exactly made Hendrix so brilliant, least of all on this album.

    http://maximumfun.org/heat-rocks/heat-rocks-ep17-vernon-reid-jimi-hendrixs-band-gypsys-1970

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  10. R.E.M. | Out Of Athens

    By the early nineties R.E.M. found themselves one of the biggest bands on the planet. What they had achieved was beyond their wildest dreams but it had taken them over a decade to get there. This RTÉ Radio One music documentary recorded in Athens, Georgia and North Carolina in the US by Ken Sweeney takes the listener on that journey with R.E.M. out of Athens (Georgia). Without slick videos for the new MTV, or support from mainstream radio, R.E.M. built their following playing an alternative circuit of gigs across America as evangelists for this new music. R.E.M. blazed a trail for every independent band to follow from Nirvana to Pearl Jam.

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    Original video: https://m.soundcloud.com/rte-radio-1/rem-out-of-athens
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 06 Jan 2018 12:23:59 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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