Tagged with “science” (722)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Darwin: In Our Time, Darwin: The Voyage of the Beagle

    How Darwin’s work during the Beagle expedition influenced his theories.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gbf2g

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Anil Seth: How your brain hallucinates your conscious reality | TED Talk | TED.com

    Right now, billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience — and not just any conscious experience, your experience of the world around you and of yourself within it. How does this happen? According to neuroscientist Anil Seth, we’re all hallucinating all the time; when we agree about our hallucinations, we call it "reality." Join Seth for a delightfully disorienting talk that may leave you questioning the very nature of your existence.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/anil_seth_how_your_brain_hallucinates_your_conscious_reality

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  3. Apocalypse, Now - On The Media - WNYC

    Science fiction has always been an outlet for our greatest anxieties. This week, we delve into how the genre is exploring the reality of climate change. Plus: new words to describe the indescribable.

    1. Jeff VanderMeer @jeffvandermeer, author of the Southern Reach Trilogy and Borne, on writing about the relationships between people and nature.

    2. Claire Vaye Watkins @clairevaye talks about Gold Fame Citrus, her work of speculative fiction in which an enormous sand dune threatens to engulf the southwest.

    3. Kim Stanley Robinson discusses his latest work, New York 2140. The seas have risen 50 feet and lower Manhattan is submerged. And yet, there’s hope.

    4. British writer Robert Macfarlane @RobGMacfarlane on new language for our changing world.

    Throughout the show: listeners offer their own new vocabulary for the Anthropocene era. Many thanks to everyone who left us voice memos!

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/on-the-media-2017-07-07/

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  4. To The Best Of Our Knowledge: Time Travel

    Time plays such a big part in our lives, it’s no wonder we’re fascinated by the idea of escaping it. And what better way to escape it that to travel back into the past or forward into the future? This hour, we explore our obsession with time travel. Why is such a recurring them in movies and TV shows? And what can time travel teach us about ourselves?

    http://www.ttbook.org/book/time-travel

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  5. Can Robots be Truly Intelligent?

    From Skynet and the Terminator franchise, through Wargames and Ava in Ex Machina, artificial intelligences pervade our cinematic experiences. But AIs are already in the real world, answering our questions on our phones and making diagnoses about our health. Adam Rutherford asks if we are ready for AI, when fiction becomes reality, and we create thinking machines.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0548s57

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. James Gleick: Time Travel - The Long Now

    Time travel is time research

    Gleick began with H.G. Wells’s 1895 book The Time Machine, which created the idea of time travel.

    It soon became a hugely popular genre that shows no sign of abating more than a century later.

    “Science fiction is a way of working out ideas,” Gleick said.

    Wells thought of himself as a futurist, and like many at the end of the 19th century he was riveted by the idea of progress, so his fictional traveler headed toward the far future.

    Other authors soon explored travel to the past and countless paradoxes ranging from squashed butterflies that change later elections to advising one’s younger self.

    Gleick invited audience members to query themselves: If you could travel in time, would you go to the future or to the past?

    When exactly, and where exactly?

    And why.

    And what is your second choice?

    (Try it, reader.)

    “We’re still trying to figure out what time is,” Gleick said.

    Time travel stories apparently help us.

    The inventor of the time machine in Wells’s book explains archly that time is merely a fourth dimension.

    Ten years later in 1905 Albert Einstein made that statement real.

    In 1941 Jorge Luis Borges wrote the celebrated short story, “The Garden of Forking Paths.”

    In 1955 physicist Hugh Everett introduced the quantum-based idea of forking universes, which itself has become a staple of science fiction.

    “Time,” Richard Feynman once joked, “is what happens when nothing else happens.”

    Gleick suggests, “Things change, and time is how we keep track.”

    Virginia Woolf wrote, “What more terrifying revelation can there be than that it is the present moment?

    That we survive the shock at all is only possible because the past shelters us on one side, the future on another.”

    To answer the last question of the evening, about how his views about time changed during the course of writing Time Travel, Gleick said:

    I thought I would conclude that the main thing to understand is: Enjoy the present.

    Don’t waste your brain cells agonizing about lost opportunities or worrying about what the future will bring.

    As I was working on the book I suddenly realized that that’s terrible advice.

    A potted plant lives in the now.

    The idea of the ‘long now’ embraces the past and the future and asks us to think about the whole stretch of time.

    That’s what I think time travel is good for.

    That’s what makes us human—the ability to live in the past and live in the future at the same time.

    —Stewart Brand

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02017/jun/05/time-travel/

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  7. Adam Rogers at The Interval at Long Now | San Francisco

    "Proof: The Science of Booze": Wired Magazine editor and author of "Proof: The Science of Booze", Adam Rogers leads us on a tour of the 10,000 year story of alcohol. With deep historical research, expert testimony, and solid science he discusses the accidental discovery of fermentation, an alternative American whiskey history, and his own role in the pre-history of Long Now’s Interval bar. This talk was the first ever in The Interval’s salon talk series; it took place in May of 02014, 2 weeks before The Interval officially opened. From May 02014.

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02014/may/27/proof-science-booze

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  8. Tim O’Brien on transient stars and science and music festivals

    Tim O’Brien has earned the nickname ‘the awesome astrophysicist dude from Jodrell Bank’ He is Professor of Astrophysics at Manchester University, and the associate director of Jodrell Bank Observatory, best known for the giant, iconic radio dish of the world-famous Lovell telescope which sits majestically on the Cheshire plain, where he carries out research on the behaviour of transient binary stars called novae.

    For twenty-five years Tim O’Brien has been telling the public about astronomy, and recently he’s also become an organiser of concerts. Building on some very successful one-day events, the first Blue Dot Festival was held at Jodrell Bank in July 2016 and the second will be this summer. Tim talks to Jim al-Khalil about how he pops up on stage between acts to tell the audience about science - and doesn’t get bottled off!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08r1skf

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  9. The Computer Museum iPhone Interviews: Just the Scott Forstall part

    Scott Forstall talks to John Markoff: The 40 minute version

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGEeOKDZqGk
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 21 Jun 2017 15:59:49 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  10. Oral History of Avie Tevanian

    Interviewed by David Brock, Hansen Hsu and John Markoff on 2017-02-21 in Mountain View CA, X8111.2017 © Computer History Museum

    Born of Armenian parents in 1961, into a working class, entrepreneurial family, Avadis "Avie" Tevanian grew up in New England, the oldest of three boys. His dad a machinist, from a young age, Avie and his brothers were into building things, but Avie alone showed a particular aptitude for mathematics.

    Having been introduced to a PDP-8 in high school, Avie enrolled at the University of Rochester after discovering they had a lab of Xerox Altos, on which he wrote several games and contributed to research. Avie continued on to graduate school at Carnegie Mellon University. Working under Professor Rick Rashid, another Rochester graduate, Avie started the Mach microkernel project, which eventually grew to a group of 12 people. Based on concepts from Rashid’s Accent operating system, Mach was to be an improvement on Accent by targeting parallel processors, be highly portable, and be able to run BSD Unix programs.

    Engineers at Steve Jobs’ NeXT Computer decided they wanted to use Mach for NeXT’s operating system after they saw the work presented at a UNIX conference in 1986. Avie later attended a dinner in Palo Alto where Steve first relayed that interest. After finishing his d…

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=vwCdKU9uYnE
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 24 Jun 2017 11:50:57 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

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