markhulme / tags / singularity

Tagged with “singularity” (6)

  1. Talking about Disney’s 1964 Carousel of Progress with Bleeding Cool: our lost animatronic future / Boing Boing

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iJuwAUP56zY&feature=youtu.be Back in 2007, I wrote a science fiction novella called "The Great Big Beautiful Tomorrrow," about an immortal, transhuman survivor of an apocalypse whose father is obsessed with preserving artifacts from the fallen civilization, especially the Carousel of Progress, an exhibition that GE commissioned from Disney for the 1964 World’s Fair in New York,…

    https://boingboing.net/2019/11/25/future-shlock.html

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  2. Bruce Sterling: The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole - The Long Now

    One reason lots of people don’t want to think long term these days is because technology keeps accelerating so rapidly, we assume the world will become unrecognizable in a few years and then move on to unimaginable. Long-term thinking must be either impossible or irrelevant.

    The commonest shorthand term for the runaway acceleration of technology is “the Singularity”—a concept introduced by science fiction writer Vernor Vinge in 1984. The term has been enthusiastically embraced by technology historians, futurists, extropians, and various trans-humanists and post-humanists, who have generated variants such as “the techno-rapture,” “the Spike,” etc.

    It takes a science fiction writer to critique a science fiction idea.

    Along with being one of America’s leading science fiction writers and technology journalists, Bruce Sterling is a celebrated speaker armed with lethal wit. His books include The Zenith Angle (just out), Hacker Crackdown, Holy Fire, Distraction, Mirrorshades (cyberpunk compendium), Schismatrix, The Difference Engine (with William Gibson), Tomorrow Now, and Islands in the Net.

    The Seminar About Long-term Thinking on June 10-11 was Bruce Sterling examining “The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole.” He treated the subject of hyper-acceleration of technology as a genuine threat worth alleviating and as a fond fantasy worth cruel dismemberment.

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02004/jun/11/the-singularity-your-future-as-a-black-hole/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  3. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  4. SXSW: The Singularity is HERE

    Todd Marks presentation from SXSW 2011.

    The topic of Singularity is heating up as more people discuss what will become of the human race when computers exceed our intelligence. This presentation explores several theories about the future of mankind and points out how the technology leading us there is already HERE. “The Singularity is Near” is a book and movie written by futurist and prominent Singularitarian, Ray Kurzweil. It is a documentary with a B-line drama where Ray’s digital alter ego Ramona sets off on a quest to pass the Turing Test. Passing this test signifies the day computers can “think”, which came close to occurring a few years ago and is not far off. Learn what milestones we have already reached toward Singularity and what technologies present and future are leading us there. We will explore Location Based Services, Augmented Reality, Bio-Feedback and Smart Agents. We will analyze current trends in Bio-Technology, Nano-Technology, Computing and Robotics and discuss the possibility of Digital Immortality.

    http://schedule.sxsw.com/events/event_IAP7111

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  5. Ferdinand Feghoot a la Robinson

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ and http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    This storytelling model apparently originated in a long running series of short science fiction pieces that appeared under the collective title "Through Time and Space with Ferdinand Feghoot", published in various magazines over several decades, written by Reginald Bretnor under the anagrammatic pseudonym of Grendel Briarton. The usual formulae the stories followed were for the title character to solve a problem bedeviling some manner of being or extricate himself from a dangerous situation. The events could take place all over the galaxy and in various historical periods on Earth and elsewhere. In his adventures, Feghoot worked for the Society for the Aesthetic Re-Arrangement of History and traveled via a device that had no name but was typographically represented as the ")(". The pieces were usually vignettes only a few paragraphs long, and always ended with a deliberately terrible pun that was often based on a well-known title or catch-phrase. This story is written by Spider Robinson, a well known punster in his own right, as a homage to Reginald Brentnor

    —Huffduffed by markhulme

  6. The War Prayer, by Mark Twain, read by Walter O’Hara

    http://misternizz.podbean.com/ http://misternizz.wordpress.com

    The War Prayer is my favorite shorter fiction piece by Mr. Mark Twain, aka Samuel Clemens, distinguished man of letters and literary giant of the 19th century. The War Prayer was written quite late in his life, circa 1905. The piece was written in protest of the American-Phillipine War, which Twain opposed, and did not see print in his lifetime. Biting and caustic, The War Prayer is as powerful today as it was when it was written. I hope I have done justice to it here.

    —Huffduffed by markhulme