markcbain / collective

There are two people in markcbain’s collective.

Huffduffed (4930)

  1. Marcia Bjornerud: Timefulness - The Long Now

    research focuses on the physics of earthquakes and mountain-building. She combines field-based studies of bedrock geology with quantitative models of rock mechanics.

    She is the author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World, Reading the Rocks: The Autobiography of the Earth and is a contributing writer to the New Yorker’s Annals of Technology blog.

    Marcia Bjornerud’s Homepage
    More about Marcia Bjornerud
    

    We need a poly-temporal worldview to embrace the overlapping rates of change that our world runs on, especially the huge, powerful changes that are mostly invisible to us.

    Geologist Marcia Bjornerud teaches that kind of time literacy. With it, we become at home in the deep past and engaged with the deep future. We learn to “think like a planet.”

    As for climate change… “Dazzled by our own creations,” Bjornerud writes, “we have forgotten that we are wholly embedded in a much older, more powerful world whose constancy we take for granted…. Averse to even the smallest changes, we have now set the stage for environmental deviations that will be larger and less predictable than any we have faced before.”

    A professor of geology and environmental studies at Lawrence University in Wisconsin, Marcia Bjornerud is author of Timefulness: How Thinking Like a Geologist Can Help Save the World (2018) and Reading the Rocks: The Autobiography of the Earth (2005).

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02019/jul/22/timefulness/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Is CSS a programming language? - overflow: audible;

    In March, Heydon posted an inflammatory tweet, as he often does. :-)

    If you don’t think CSS is a programming language, you have a parochial view of programming and, I’m willing to bet, a parochial view on most other things - gender and ethnicity included.
    

    That escalated quickly. While one might be both racist and not consider CSS to be a programming language, it seems a spurious correlation. And it’s an especially strong take, given that Heydon appears to have changed his position on the matter. This was him tweeting in 2013:

    HTML is not a programming language. CSS even less so.
    

    So, which is it? Are we on the path to yet another “it depends”? And whether it depends or not, does it matter? Would “elevating” CSS to the status of a programming language encourage programmers to take CSS development more seriously? Or does moving CSS into a realm with a traditionally higher barrier to entry end up an exercise in exclusion?

    Heydon and I discuss this. For an hour. It’s a civil conversation, don’t worry.

    https://www.overflowaudible.com/posts/is-css-a-programming-language/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. The Blarney Pilgrims Podcast Episode 9: Kevin Burke

    A boy in post war London, learning the fiddle from Ms. Christopherson, bumping into Joe Burke at JFK after failing to get Arlo Guthrie’s phone number from Directory Enquiries, and so much more. This was delightful. Have a listen.

    https://blarneypilgrims.fireside.fm/9

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 4 Good Old Boys

    If you disagree with someone — if you find what they think appalling — is there any value in talking to them? In the early 1970s, the talk show host Dick Cavett, the governor of Georgia Lester Maddox, and the singer Randy Newman tried to answer this question.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/34-good-old-boys

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 3Tempest in a Teacup

    Bohea, the aroma of tire fire, Mob Wives, smugglers, “bro” tea, and what it all means to the backstory of the American Revolution. Malcolm tells the real story on what happened in Boston on the night of December 16, 1773.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/33-tempest-in-a-teacup

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 2 The Tortoise and the Hare

    A weird speech by Antonin Scalia, a visit with the some serious legal tortoises, and a testy exchange with the experts at the Law School Admissions Council prompts Malcolm to formulate his Grand Unified Theory for fixing higher education.

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/32-the-tortoise-and-the-hare

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. There’s still hope for building on the web - The Verge

    Nilay Patel interviews Paul Ford about his hopefulness in tech, his recent piece in Wired, and the state of building stuff for the web.

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/8/6/20751655/paul-ford-interview-web-writer-programmer-vergecast-podcast

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Revisionist History Podcast Episode 1: Puzzle Rush

    Malcolm challenges his assistant Camille to the Law School Admissions Test. He gets halfway through, panics, runs out of time, and wonders: why does the legal world want him to rush?"

    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/31-puzzle-rush

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. Rutgar Bregman’s case for UBI, open borders, and a 15-hour workweek - Vox

    Rutger Bregman, author of Utopia for Realists, talks to Ezra Klein about the power and purpose of utopian thinking.

    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2019/7/26/8909436/rutger-bregman-utopia-for-realists-ubi-open-borders

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. Orhan Pamuk Reads Jorge Luis Borges

    Orhan Pamuk joins Deborah Treisman to read and discuss “Ibn Hakkan Al-Bokhari, Dead in his Labyrinth,” by Jorge Luis Borges, from a 1970 issue of the magazine. Pamuk’s novels include “Snow,” “My Name is Red,” and “The Museum of Innocence.” He received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2006.

    https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/fiction/orhan-pamuk-reads-jorge-luis-borges

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

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