madmotive / tags / psychology

Tagged with “psychology” (2)

  1. Don’t Feed the Trolls

    The web community is one of the most vibrant and fun groups I’ve ever been lucky enough to be a part of. Like any vibrant community, sometimes people don’t play nicely.

    In this session, I will discuss what it has been like to be shy and be on twitter, mailing lists, and open source. I’ll talk about my experiences consulting on massive CSS overhauls, and ways to defeat trolls—including your own inner troll!

    I’ll also share a timing attack for your brain that might just surprise you.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/nicole/

    Nicole Sullivan and her business partner Nicholas Zakas are like The A Team of front-end web performance. If you have a CSS problem, if no one else can help you, and if you can find them, maybe you can hire …The Stubbornella Team.

    Before starting up her own consultancy Nicole worked inside Yahoo, building a culture of performance and quality with the front-end developers there. Now she embeds herself in companies like Facebook when they need to get their style sheet bloat under control.

    Nicole’s approach to front-end development is encapsulated in her OOCSS framework — a modular and maintable way of building interfaces on the web. She also made CSS Lint, a piece of opinated software to help developers write CSS to the highest standard.

    But for all her immense knowledge about CSS and performance, Nicole’s most powerful skills are in the areas of collaboration and communication. She is a tireless crusader for knowledge and as if she did’t have enough projects to keep her busy, she recently organised CSS Conf in Florida, the first of its kind.

    —Huffduffed by madmotive

  2. Great; things are connected, but what will they actually talk about?

    We take it for granted that smart and connected products will bring a benefit to our lives, but connecting is only the first step.

    To get away from the repetitive visions of the connected, efficient and sterile home of the future and to look for new and more human scenarios, we need to shift from designing internets to designing relationships of things.

    People have bias, stereotypes and cultural beliefs that they pass into the products that they design. Companies have business goals that they have to meet and rivalries with other competitors. If we take the point of view of a product in this scenario, how will its life change?

    New relationships and conversations will emerge between products with different goals or references and at the same time with people that will live with them.

    If we stop only drawing dotted lines between products, but we actually start looking at what relationship could emerge on that line, we will find ourselves exploring a new way of understating services and interactions with connected products.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/simone/

    Simone Rebaudengo hails from Turin, lived in Sweden for a while, and now spends most of his time in Munich where he works as an interaction designer with Frog Design.

    His fascination with the way that people and objects interact with each has led to some amazing work. Not content with exploring the Internet Of Things, he‘s experimenting with the Internet Of Things With Feelings. He paints an all-too-believable picture of how network-enabled objects might behave when they know how other objects on the network are being used. I, for one, welcome our neurotic robotic overlords.

    We invited Simone to come along and speak at our other conference, UX London, and it was a smash hit. I remember thinking, “Oh man, this is perfect for this year’s dConstruct!”

    You’re going to love him.

    You can see Simone’s work at simonerebaudengo.com and you should really check out his Tumblr blog, Designed Addictions.

    —Huffduffed by madmotive