madmotive / tags / culture

Tagged with “culture” (2)

  1. Fan is a Tool-Using Animal

    What happens when you build a nice website, and a real community shows up that doesn’t meet your expectations?

    Since the earliest days of Usenet, fandom has wandered the Internet, finding remarkable ways to assemble websites, plug-ins, and online forums into tools for sharing and organizing erotic fiction. Often ostracized and ridiculed for their hobby, this community of rather gentle people has learned to work with the materials at hand, building for themselves what they could not get from others, in the process creating a culture of collaboration and mutual respect other online projects can only envy.

    Fans are inveterate classifiers, and the story of how they have bent websites to their will (in a process reminiscent of their favorite works) may change the way you think about online communities, or at the very least, about librarians.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/maciej/

    Maciej Cegłowski is my favourite writer on the web.

    But don‘t take my word for it. Have a read through Idle Words and see for yourself. Travel, food, jellyfish, and space shuttles are just some of the subjects he has tackled. Perhaps you‘ve heard about Argentina on Two Steaks a Day or maybe you‘re familiar with The Alameda-Weehawken Burrito Tunnel.

    When he‘s not lovingly crafting words, Maciej lovingly crafts Pinboard—the bookmarking service with the radical business model of actually charging customers money (see also: the revolutionary Pinboard Investment Co-Prosperity Cloud that offers startup funding of $37 to successful applicants).

    His pragmatic approach to building a sustainable and scalable business is a breath of fresh air in the fetid miasma of most startups, and his observations and updates on the Pinboard blog are almost as good as Idle Words.

    —Huffduffed by madmotive

  2. Unexpected Item In The Bagging Area

    In the 1980s geophysicist Andy Hildebrand was working for Exxon analysing seismic survey data. Hildebrand created digital signal processing software that took recordings of waves travelling through the ground from dynamite explosions and processed them to find hidden pockets of oil.

    In 2013 the software has a new name and a very different purpose. You can hear its output on the radio, on YouTube and on X-Factor. No longer a tool for geophysicists but for pop stars. Auto-Tune uses the same process that identified underground rock layers to make vocals sound pitch perfect. To an algorithm there is no difference between Kanye’s voice and an oil deposit.

    Auto-Tune isn’t the only technology shaping our lives in unexpected ways. In this talk we’ll look at our software mediated world, it’s consequences and our role in it as creators.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/dan/

    Dan W. makes things. Sometimes those things are made of atoms. Sometimes they are made of bits.

    Display Cabinet is a mixture of both. And even the purely digital services Arrivals and When Should I Visit? are designed to make smooth your journey through the world of atoms and matter by giving you easy access to information from the networked world of bits.

    Dan works at Pervasive Media Studio in Bristol. You can find his scrapbook on Tumblr where he documents the seemingly science-fictional collisions of technology and society that he sees happening all around.

    —Huffduffed by madmotive