lvilgen / LD

There are no people in lvilgen’s collective.

Huffduffed (6)

  1. A Touchy History of the Future

    We pinch it, tap it, shake it and poke it. We’re so enthralled with finally getting to touch our products. But there’s so much more to direct manipulation than just tapping it with our fingers! Let’s explore some progressive interaction models that go beyond touch and into movement, infrared, wearable computing, sound and ambient data to really give us an idea of what our immersive interactive future may hold and how we might curate that future now.

    http://my.sxsw.com/events/event/7498

    —Huffduffed by lvilgen

  2. The Physics of Time

    When writing the Principia Mathematica, Isaac Newton declared his hand on most of the big questions in physics. He outlined the nature of space, explained the motions of the planets and conceived the operation of gravity. He also laid down the law on time declaring:

    “Absolute, true, and mathematical time, of itself and from its own nature, flows equably without relation to anything external.”

    For Newton time was absolute and set apart from the universe, but with the theories of Albert Einstein time became more complicated; it could be squeezed and distorted and was different in different places.

    Time is integral to our experience of things but we find it very difficult to think about. It may not even exist and yet seems written into the existence of absolutely everything.

    Contributors:

    Jim Al-Khalili, Professor of Theoretical Physics and Chair in the Public Engagement in Science at the University of Surrey

    Monica Grady, Professor of Planetary and Space Sciences at the Open University

    Ian Stewart, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Warwick

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/inourtime_20081218.shtml

    (sometimes, they pull these shows after a week…but there’s a real audio stream available on their site: http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/history/inourtime/rams/inourtime_20081218.ram)

    —Huffduffed by lvilgen

  3. Why It’s Hard to Admit to Being Wrong

    We all have a hard time admitting that we’re wrong, but according to a new book about human psychology, it’s not entirely our fault. Social psychologist Elliot Aronson says our brains work hard to make us think we are doing the right thing, even in the face of sometimes overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

    Elliot Aronson, co-author, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me); social psychologist; professor emeritus, psychology, University of California Santa Cruz.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12125926

    —Huffduffed by lvilgen