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loppear / Luke

There are no people in loppear’s collective.

Huffduffed (7)

  1. A History of the World in 100 Objects: Lewis Chessmen

    Ivory chess pieces found in the Outer Hebrides. They take us to the world of Northern Europe at a time when Norway ruled parts of Scotland. Neil MacGregor, Director of the British Museum, describes the medieval world of the Chessmen and explains how the game evolved. Historian Miri Rubin considers the genesis of the pieces and the novelist Martin Amis celebrates the metaphorical power of chess.

    From http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/ahow/all

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  2. 1989: Restitching the City

    Rosie Goldsmith goes under Berlin to tell the story of the epic task of rejoining the various vital systems of the two halves of the city, torn apart when the wall went up.

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  3. Everything The Network Touches

    The work we’re collectively doing—opening up gradually all of human information and media, making it recombinable, helping people create and share their work—is a huge unspoken, sexy, world-redefining mission.

    It’s a mission that many of us have become blasé about, almost unaware of. It’s a project so large that it’s hard to get a grasp on. And the next few years are going to get even more interesting as the network pervades physical objects and environments, sensing and manifesting information in the real world.

    It’s time to recognise the scale of the project we have in front of us, the breadth of the material we have to work with, and the possibilities of design within it. All of human knowledge, creativity—even the planet itself—is our canvas.

    http://2010.dconstruct.org/speakers/tom-coates

    Tom Coates is a technologist and writer, focused on the shape of the web to come and on developing new concepts that thrive in it. He’s worked for many prominent web companies including Time Out, the BBC and Yahoo! where he was Head of Product for the Brickhouse innovation team. He’s most known for the Fire Eagle location-sharing service, and for his work on social software, future media and the web of data.

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  4. How Prosperity Evolves

    With our economy a shambles and our environment threatened, is there any reason to be optimistic about the future? Matt Ridley says there’s scientific proof to say we should be.

    Here’s an article from Matt Ridley on the same subject: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703691804575254533386933138.html#printMode

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  5. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid systems have been used in print design, architecture and interior design for generations. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid system composition and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to laptops. Users can manipulate the browser, they can remove content, resize the canvas, resize the typefaces. A designer is no longer in control of this presentation. So where do grid systems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  6. Long Now: Six Easy Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization

    Neuroscientist and fiction writer David Eagleman presents "Six Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization."

    Civilizations always think they’re immortal, Eagleman says, but they nearly always perish, leaving "nothing but ruins and scattered genetics." It takes luck and new technology to survive. We may be particularly lucky to have Internet technology to help manage the six requirements of a durable civilization

    http://fora.tv/2010/04/01/Six_Easy_Steps_to_Avert_the_Collapse_of_Civilization

    —Huffduffed by loppear

  7. Designing Social Interfaces

    Jared Spool interviews Erin Malone and Christian Crumlish, authors of the new book, Designing Social Interfaces. An outgrowth from creating the Yahoo! Design Pattern Library, the book is a perfect repository for anyone planning, designing, and building social aspects into their applications.

    Jared discusses several points with Erin and Christian, including,

    • How the book became a huge collection of social design elements and how people are using Designing Social Interfaces in the wild
    • Could a better understanding of social design patterns have helped Google launch Buzz with less blowback?
    • Expecting to build a community on your site, versus leveraging existing communities (for example, Facebook Connect)
    • The growth of social in new contexts (mobile, new audiences)

    From http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/2010/04/09/spoolcast-crumlish-and-malone-design-the-social-in/

    —Huffduffed by loppear