liqweed / Ophir Radnitz

There are no people in liqweed’s collective.

Huffduffed (14)

  1. Joyce Appleby, “The Relentless Revolution: A History of Capitalism” (Norton, 2010)

    Today everybody wants to be a capitalist, even Chinese communists. It would be easy to think, then, that capitalism is “natural,” that there is a little profit-seeker in each one of us just waiting to pop out. There is some

    http://newbooksinhistory.com/2011/02/04/joyce-appleby-the-relentless-revolution-a-history-of-capitalism-norton-2010/

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  2. Think You Know ‘How To Write A Sentence’? : NPR

    Most people know a good sentence when they read one, but New York Times columnist Stanley Fish says most of us don't really know how to write them ourselves. His new book, How To Write A Sentence: And How To Read One, is part ode, part how-to guide to the art of the well-constructed sentence.

    http://www.npr.org/2011/01/25/133214521/stanley-fish-demystifies-how-to-write-a-sentence

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  3. Another Five Numbers, 5: Game Theory

    Episode five of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    In 2000, the UK government received a windfall of around £23 billion from its auction of third generation (3G) mobile phone licences. This astronomical sum wasn't the result of corporate bidders "losing their heads", but a careful strategy designed to maximise proceeds for the Treasury.

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  4. Another Five Numbers, 4: Kepler’s Conjecture

    Episode four of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Johannes Kepler experimented with different ways of stacking spheres. He concluded that the "face-centred cubic lattice" was best. Using this method, Kepler calculated that the packing efficiency rose to 74%, constituting the highest efficiency you could ever get. But, how to prove it?

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  5. Another Five Numbers, 3: The Largest Prime Number

    Episode three of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Think of a number. Any number. Chances are you haven't plumped for 2 to the power of 13,466,917 -1. To get this, you would need to keep multiplying 2 by itself 13,466,917 times, and then subtract 1 from the result. When written down it's 4,053,900 digits long and fills 2 telephone directories. So, as you can imagine, it's not the kind of number you're likely to stumble over often. Unless you're Bill Gates checking your bank statement at the end of the month.

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  6. Another Five Numbers, 2: The Number Seven

    Episode two of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Picture a gambler. Is it George Clooney, tuxedo ruffled after an all-nighter at a Vegas Black Jack table, or your old Aunt Doris putting down her yearly quid-on-the-nose for the Grand National? Recent research would suggest that it's neither. Your inveterate gambler is far more likely to be sporting leather patches at their elbows, an unhealthy appetite for corduroy, and a penchant for M-Series rather than Martinis, shaken or stirred. Some mathematicians are putting their mathematical theory where their mouth is and are betting the shirts, stuffed or otherwise, off their backs.

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  7. Another Five Numbers, 1: The Number Four

    Episode one of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Simon Singh's journey begins with the number 4, which for over a century has fuelled one of the most elusive problems in mathematics: is it true that any map can be coloured with just 4 colours so that no two neighbouring countries have the same colour? This question has tested some of the most imaginative minds — including Lewis Carroll's — and the eventual solution has aided the design of some of the world's most complex air and road networks.

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

  8. Five Numbers, 4: The Imaginary Number

    Episode four of Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    The imaginary number takes mathematics to another dimension. It was discovered in sixteenth century Italy at a time when being a mathematician was akin to being a modern day rock star, when there was 'nuff respect' to be had from solving a particularly 'wicked' equation. And the wicked equation of the day went like this: "If the square root of 1 is both 1 and -1, then what is the square root of -1?"

    —Huffduffed by liqweed

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