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liberatr / collective / tags / accessibility

Tagged with “accessibility” (32)

  1. Léonie Watson — The Good, The Bad, and The Interesting

    Right before a role=drinks meetup I had a very pleasant conversation with Léonie Watson about what quality means to her. Her definition of quality may differ a bit from many other digital designers and engineers. Léonie turned blind 16 years ago, so certain things we consider to be important might not even exist for her, and the things that are most important to her may not be the first things designers and developers think about.

    We talked about why so many websites are badly built. About the fundamental basics that are missing in many of the frameworks that developers like to use today. And about the designers who believe that wow-experience is more important than user experience. We also talked about the future of technology, incredible things like AI, and how this may make life so much easier for so many people: I like the idea of self driving cars, Léonie needs one. But we also talk about some of the conflicts that exist, for instance between accessibility and privacy, or between different needs of different people.

    It was a pleasant conversation. And the tea was nice as well.

    https://vasilis.nl/gbi/2016/10/09/leonie-watson/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. BBC Radio - Ouch: Disability Talk, Facebook salad

    Meet Matt King. He’s an enngineer who works at Facebook HQ in California. He’s one of the people on a team who works towards making the big social network accessible. (a transcript of this podcast will appear on this page soon)

    King explains the recent AI innovation on Facebook which describes photos to blind people. He talks about future aspirations and tells us what you can get to eat on Facebook campus, for free, at lunchtime. His favourite is a huge big salad, hence the title of this podcast.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p049l1p7

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. Episode 12 with Marcy Sutton

    On today’s episode we sit down with Marcy Sutton—a senior front end engineer at Deque Systems, where she works on accessibility. We talk about the intersection and differentiations in performance and accessibility. Marcy explains that there’s a huge audience that’s being missed by not making your website accessible.

    Unfortunately, if it’s not something you have a personal connection to, it may not occur to you to think about. We talk about how most companies become interested in accessibility after they suffer a lawsuit, and how Marcy’s teaching us ways we can be proactive instead of reactive. We look at tools on how to make our sites more accessible and who to make them accessible for. We also talk about the metrics to use to measure success and usability.

    https://pathtoperf.com/2016/09/29/12-with-marcy-sutton.html

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Progressive Enhancement, Revisited, with Aaron Gustafson «CTRL+CLICK CAST

    Author, developer and web standards evangelist Aaron Gustafson returns to the show to discuss progressive enhancement and how fundamental concepts are still relevant today. We discuss development philosophies as well as dive into development specifics of progressive enhancement, how planning and responsive design fits in, as well as the business and user case for always developing with progressive enhancement in mind.

    http://ctrlclickcast.com/episodes/progressive-enhancement-revisited

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. The Web Should Just Work for Everyone

    The web should just work for everyone: Microsoft Edge and Inclusive Design

    https://channel9.msdn.com/Events/WebPlatformSummit/edgesummit2016/ES1612

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. There are no “buts” in Progressive Enhancement by Aaron Gustafson

    Progressive enhancement sounds practical, but not for your current project, right? Good news: you’re wrong!

    In this session, Aaron will debunk the myths that often preclude individuals and organizations from embracing progressive enhancement and demonstrate solid techniques for applying progressive enhancement in your work.

    By the end of this session, you’ll walk away with

    • a better sense of the devices people are using to access the Web,

    • a framework for envisioning experience as a continuum, and

    • a solid understanding of how to improve the accessibility and reach of your Web projects.

    Come find out why progressive enhancement isn’t just for “content” sites (whatever those are).

    ===
    Original video: https://vimeo.com/144979022
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. How to make websites more accessible for people who are deaf - Spark with Nora Young | CBC Radio

    This time on Spark we’re looking at designing for connection, learning and accessibility. But what does accessibility online look like? Joe Dolson is a web developer who specializes in accessible web design.

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/spark/301-teaching-through-text-message-designing-connection-and-more-1.3338846/how-to-make-websites-more-accessible-for-people-who-are-deaf-1.3338862

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. BBC Radio - Ouch: Disability Talk, How do blind people interpret emojis?

    Apple has released 150 brand new emojis. The internet is becoming increasingly visual but how do blind people experience these graphics, and is digital communication becoming more inaccessible?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p036111y

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. The Web Ahead #105: Progressive Enhancement with Aaron Gustafson

    Progressive Enhancement is a core principle of the web. But these days it seems a lot of folks don’t quite understand what it’s about. Aaron Gustafson joins Jen Simmons to break it down, and explain why and how your website should be built using the principles of Progressive Enhancement.

    http://5by5.tv/webahead/105

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. What are we doing about accessibility? | Government Digital Service

    Joshua Marshall is Head of Accessibility at GDS. Just before Christmas, we sat him down for a short chat about his work.

    In Joshua’s opinion, the single most important thing GDS has done to improve accessibility across government is “change how we write.”

    Improving the quality of all the written content on GOV.UK has made more of a difference than anything else, he says. “It’s changed the perception of how government talks to its citizens.”

    There are other important lessons Joshua has learned, including:

    • everything we build should be accessible by default - accessibility is never an afterthought

    • scaling knowledge between members of growing product teams all over the country was a hard problem to solve

    • we’ve put a lot of work into accessibility but there’s still more we can do, particularly for the deaf community

    —Huffduffed by charleroper

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