Tagged with “bbc” (334)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, The Physics of Reality

    Melvyn Bragg examines the attempt to reconcile Quantum Theory and classical physics.

    Melvyn Bragg examines the physics of reality. When Quantum Mechanics was developed in the early 20th century reality changed forever. In the quantum world particles could be in two places at once, they disappeared for no reason and reappeared in unpredictable locations, they even acted differently according to whether we were watching them. It was so shocking that Erwin Schrodinger, one of the founders of Quantum Theory, said "I don’t like it and I’m sorry I ever had anything to do with it." He even developed an experiment with a cat to show how absurd it was. Quantum Theory was absurd, it disagreed with the classical physics of Newton and Einstein and it clashed with our experience of the everyday world. Footballs do not disappear without reason, cats do not split into two and shoes do not act differently when we are not looking at them. Or do they? Eighty years later we are still debating whether the absurd might actually be true. But why are features of quantum physics not seen in our experience of everyday reality? Can the classical and quantum worlds be reconciled, and why should reality make sense to us? With Roger Penrose, Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics, Oxford University; Fay Dowker, Lecturer in Theoretical Physics, Queen Mary, University of London; Tony Sudbery, Professor of Mathematics, University of York.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548dl

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  2. BBC Radio 4 - The Life Scientific, Stephanie Shirley on computer coding

    As a young woman, Stephanie Shirley worked at the Dollis Hill Research Station building computers from scratch: but she told young admirers that she worked for the Post Office, hoping they would think she sold stamps. In the early 60s she changed her name to Steve and started selling computer programmes to companies who had no idea what they were or what they could do, employing only mothers who worked from home writing code by hand with pen and pencil and then posted it to her. By the mid-80s her software company employed eight thousand people, still mainly women with children. She made an absolute fortune but these days Stephanie thinks less about making money and much more about how best to give it away.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05pmvl8

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  3. In the Wake of Wakefield

    Twenty years ago, in February 1998, one of the most serious public health scandals of the 20th century was born, when researcher, Andrew Wakefield and his co-authors published a paper in the medical journal The Lancet suggesting a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. As we know, in the years that followed, Wakefield’s paper was completely discredited as "an elaborate fraud" and retracted. Attempts by many other researchers to replicate his "findings" have all failed and investigations unearthed commercial links and conflicts of interests underpinning his original work. Wakefield himself was struck off the medical register.

    And yet, the ripples of that episode are still being felt today all over the world as a resurgent anti-vaccine movement continues to drive down inoculation rates, particularly in developed Western societies, where measles rates have rocketed particularly in Europe and the United States.

    But the Wakefield scandal hasn’t just fostered the current ant-vax movement but has played a key role in helping to undermine trust in a host of scientific disciplines from public health research to climate science and GM technology.

    Through the archive, science journalist Adam Rutherford explores the continuing legacy of the anti-vaccine movement on the anniversary of one of its most notorious episodes, and explore its impact on health, on research and on culture both at home and abroad.

    Adam Rutherford explores the 20-year legacy of a paper linking the MMR vaccine and autism.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05zfl70

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  4. Boring Talks #01 - The End Of The World

    What is the specific date of Armageddon according to Douglas Adams? Steve Cross finds out

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05w5bkx

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  5. Highest-Capacity Data Cable

    There is news of the high-capacity data cable stretching across the Atlantic that has now been completed. The cable is threaded across the ocean floor from Virginia Beach, Virginia to Bilbao, Spain.

    Researchers from MIT are developing a system that allows a “Primer” robot to don various exoskeletons to give it different capabilities. Daniela Rus from MIT joins Click to discuss it.

    Nisha Ligon’s company Ubongo is a winner of this year’s WISE award. Ligon talks about designing digital material for school children in Africa.

    An AI retreat at the location in Norway used for the film Ex-Machina has been the focus of expert discussion on the future of AI. Bill Thompson joined the retreat arranged by Clearleft’s Andy Budd.

    Fixfest, the first international gathering for the community repair movement takes place at the weekend bringing together fixers from Argentina to Norway. Click hears from one of the organisers, Janet Gaunter of the Restart Project and from Jean-Sébastien Bigras whose company Insertech specialises in teaching repair and preventing waste.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cstxl1

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  6. Brian Cox on Robert Oppenheimer

    Significant international thinkers deliver the BBC’s flagship annual lecture series

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05hctvq

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  7. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Complexity

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss complexity theory.

    Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss complexity and how it can help us understand the world around us. When living beings come together and act in a group, they do so in complicated and unpredictable ways: societies often behave very differently from the individuals within them. Complexity was a phenomenon little understood a generation ago, but research into complex systems now has important applications in many different fields, from biology to political science. Today it is being used to explain how birds flock, to predict traffic flow in cities and to study the spread of diseases.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03ls154

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  8. Driving Bill Drummond Seriously…

    Bill Drummond is driving to every county in Ireland in five days. But what’s driving Bill?

    Bill Drummond is many things. As well as an artist, a writer and former pop-star - he’s the owner of an old curfew tower in Northern Ireland which he runs as an artists’ residency. Last year some poets from Belfast’s Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry stayed there and Bill published their collected work in a little black book called The Curfew Tower is Many Things.

    Except for a poem the award-winning Belfast poet Stephen Sexton wrote. Apparently that one went missing. So Bill has left two pages blank in the book for Stephen to fill in with poetry as they drive through all of Ireland’s 32 counties in 5 days in a white Ford Transit hire-van, giving out copies as they go.

    But what exactly is driving Bill Drummond?

    Producer Conor Garrett is there to find out. As they cross the Irish border and over each county boundary, Conor is becoming increasingly concerned he may not have a good enough story for his radio programme. It’s a problem further complicated by the fact Bill won’t talk about his chart-topping ’90s pop band who once famously set fire to a very large pile of their own cash. Then, when a narrative arc does eventually develop, Conor can’t be sure how authentic it is. And what’s all this stuff about eels?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05cpm29

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  9. Butterbeer and Grootcakes

    Aleks Krotoski takes her seat at the table to explore the amazing world of fictional food made real.

    Food is not a new force in fiction, but increasingly fictional food is finding its way onto the table. And fan communities from the new breed of modern cultural canon aren’t just nibbling on Laura Esquivel’s devastating quail in rose petal sauce from Like Water for Chocolate, but also tucking in to fried squirrel and raccoon from The Hunger Games, Sansa’s lemon cakes from Game of Thrones, or downing a frothy glass of butterbeer from Harry Potter.

    Now Aleks gathers together three people who know a lot about fictional food to discuss its appeal for fans, authors and food creators alike. Together, they will make, and eat, a meal of food from fiction, and discuss some of the interesting questions it raises.

    Joanne Harris is author of several novels where food is almost a character in its own right - most famously Chocolat, which was turned into a film of the same name; she also co-created a cookbook, The Little Book of Chocolat, for the many fans desperate to make the concoctions they had read about in her novels. Sam Bompas is co-founder of creative food studio Bompas & Parr, who recently helped create Dinner At The Twits, inspired by Roald Dahl’s book. And Kate Young brings together her passion for food and literature in her blog The Little Library Café, where she creates recipes for food found in fiction, and many of them will be included in her first cookbook, The Little Library Cookbook.

    The programme also includes music played on the flavour conductor - a working cocktail organ, conceived by Sam Bompas for Johnnie Walker. The music is composed by Simon Little.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0560f1h

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  10. Alternate

    Follow The Digital Human’s Aleks Krotoski as she heads down a rabbit hole.

    Aleks Krotoski tells the story of a film that doesn’t exist and the online community convinced that it does.

    We hear from people who have come together on the online site Reddit to share their memories of the film, including a former video shop worker called Don.

    Many of them have very clear memories of watching Shazaam and are convinced it’s disappearance is related to a strange phenomenon called The Mandela Effect, so named after the late South African activist Nelson Mandela.

    We follow Don on an epic journey as he tries to uncover proof. Along the way we’ll encounter conspiracy theories, alternate worlds, computer simulations and a recently deceased Australian inventor called Henry Hoke. It’s going to get weird.

    But what does this willingness to believe in something despite all evidence to the contrary tell us about the online world and the way communities form in the digital sphere?

    Aleks speaks with anthropologist Genevieve Bell about the stories we tell; cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman and Professor of Philosophy at Oxford University Nick Bostrom. Amelia Tait of the New Statesman explains how the story of Shazaam has evolved online.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b08pdy0f

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