lach / tags / ubu

Tagged with “ubu” (8)

  1. SON[I]A #250: Kenneth Goldsmith

    Kenneth Goldsmith is a multidisciplinary author, artist, editor, poet and all round agent provocateur. He once claimed to have appropriated and conveniently reshaped Douglas Huebler’s infamous line: ‘The world is full of objects, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more.’ Goldsmith’s version, ‘The world is full of texts, more or less interesting; I do not wish to add any more’, seems to be only half true, though. Both his writing and his archival practice as the founder of UbuWeb, draw heavily on collage, appropriation and the power of the copy as the ultimate creative gesture. But this has, contrary to the claim, yielded a vast opus of critically acclaimed texts, novels, essays and experimental literary objects built through accumulation and sedimentation. In this conversation, Kenneth discusses some of his own phases as an artist, and establishes a rather unexpected connection between early 20th century avant-garde movements and the digital age. Despite the time gap between the two, Goldsmith traces an invisible line that invites us to view modernism under a different light, not so much as a failed revolution, but as a slow process of sedimentation, whose droplets sank and filtered throughout decades, only to resurface now in the wild stream of our own digital culture.

    SON[I]A talks to Kenneth Goldsmith about challenging and unchallenging literature, the DNA of the internet and what he calls his “third act”.

    https://rwm.macba.cat/en/sonia/kenneth-goldsmith-literature/capsula

    —Huffduffed by lach

  2. 0. Welcome to American Suburb | Q’ed Up | KQED News

    Welcome to American Suburb, the first season of KQED’s new podcast, Q’ed up.

    Gentrification is changing cities across America, forcing people from neighborhoods they have long called home. Call them the displaced. Now those priced out of the Bay Area are looking for a better life in an unlikely place. American Suburb follows this migration to one California town along the Delta, 45 miles from San Francisco. But is this once sleepy suburb ready for them?

    KQED’s Devin Katayama and Sandhya Dirks explore that question, taking us into the ordinary spaces of suburban life to find extraordinary stories about race, poverty and belonging.

    https://ww2.kqed.org/news/2017/01/19/welcome-to-american-suburb/

    —Huffduffed by lach

  3. 1: The Future of Language — The Future is Now

    Contemporary American poet Kenneth Goldsmith woke up one morning and decided to re-type a complete edition of the New York Times. A year and a half later, he was done. He calls this practice "uncreative writing", and he believes that it can help us understand how writers will use language in the future.

    http://www.futurenowcast.com/episodes/ep1

    —Huffduffed by lach

  4. Kenneth Goldsmith | Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth

    Kenneth Goldsmith, a New York-based poet whose writing has been described as, “some of the most exhaustive and beautiful collage work yet produced in poetry” by Publishers Weekly, is founding editor of the online archive UbuWeb (ubu.com), and among other endeavors, is also the editor of I’ll Be Your Mirror: The Selected Andy Warhol Interviews, which was the basis for the opera, “Trans-Warhol”, that premiered in Geneva in 2007. While the exhibition Andy Warhol: The Last Decade focuses on the artist’s paintings, Goldsmith’s Tuesday Evenings presentation, The Hyperlinked Warhol: The Artist as King of Media, highlights other activities that Warhol was involved in toward the end of his life, including forays into cable and network television, fashion modeling, advertising, and computer art. This lecture fleshes out the full spectrum of what it meant to be Andy Warhol at the end of his life. What emerges is a portrait of the artist as media visionary, one who, nearly three decades ago, accurately predicted our current infatuation with technology, celebrity, and social networking.

    http://themodern.org/podcast/Kenneth Goldsmith

    —Huffduffed by lach

  5. Harry Smith Interviewed by P. Adams Sitney (1965), Part 2

    In this remarkable recording filmmaker/artist/ethnomusicologist/alchemist Harry Smith is interviewed in his room at the Chelsea Hotel by a young P. Adams Sitney. In part two, Smith discusses his hand-drawn film techniques, his work on a film adaptation of THE WIZARD OF OZ, his lost films, borrowed (and pawned) cameras, Native American dance, and the relationship in his painting to music and sound.

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/smith_h.html

    —Huffduffed by lach

  6. Harry Smith Interviewed by P. Adams Sitney (1965), Part 1

    In this remarkable recording filmmaker/artist/ethnomusicologist/alchemist Harry Smith is interviewed in his room at the Chelsea Hotel by a young P. Adams Sitney. In part one, Smith discusses family, his growing up in Washington, Berkeley, dope, and influences.

    http://www.ubu.com/sound/smith_h.html

    —Huffduffed by lach

  7. Brian Eno Interviewed on KPFA’s Ode to Gravity, 1980. Part 2

    Reel II starts with the history of the recording studio as a compositional tool and collaboration with David Byrne on album My Life in the Bush of Ghosts. Eno also talks about and listens to Elvis, The Supremes, Sly Stone, Lee Perry and Jimmy Hendrix. Then he offers some unfinished pieces from his upcoming album with David Byrne.

    http://ubu.com/sound/eno.html

    —Huffduffed by lach

  8. Brian Eno Interviewed on KPFA’s Ode to Gravity, 1980. Part 1

    Charles Amirkhanian and Brian Eno discuss Phonetic Poetry, how Brian writes his lyrics, and the spirit of inquisitiveness at KPFA Radio on Saturday February 2, 1980. Listen to some of Brian Enos pieces; After the Heat, Everything Merges With the Night, Another Green World, Spirits Drifting and sections of other pieces. Brian Eno also discusses the artist Peter Schmidt and their work on the Oblique Strategies Cards, being a producer, Process vs Product and looping. Reel I ends with some thoughts on Steve Reich and his music.

    http://ubu.com/sound/eno.html

    —Huffduffed by lach