lach / tags / twitter:user=textfiles

Tagged with “twitter:user=textfiles” (2)

  1. Interview with Jason Scott regarding Geocities

    This is a collection of Geocities data downloaded by a bunch of people who call themselves ARCHIVE TEAM, who began scraping the Yahoo! Geocities site during a six month period in 2009, before Yahoo! shut down geocities.com on October 26th, 2009.

    At the time of the purchase, Geocities was the THIRD most popular website on the Internet. Even by the time of its shutdown, it was in the top 250. We don’t have complete rock-solid knowledge of why it was shut down, but all signs point to Yahoo! trying to get back to basics (like, uh, having a huge audience?) and Geocities magically didn’t fall into this new "focus", and lacked any internal cheerleader to make it last through meetings.

    Yahoo! succeeded in destroying the most amount of history in the shortest amount of time, certainly on purpose, in known memory. Millions of files, user accounts, all gone.

    http://www.archive.org/details/2009-archiveteam-geocities-part1

    —Huffduffed by lach

  2. Full Interview: Jason Scott on online video and digital heritage | Spark | CBC Radio

    Archivist, technology historian, and filmmaker Jason Scott talks to Nora Young about online video, digital heritage, and how the internet isn’t as permanent as we might think.

    About two weeks ago, I got an email from Google:

    On April 29, 2011, videos that have been uploaded to Google Video will no longer be available for playback. We’ve added a Download button to the video status page, so you can download any video content you want to save. If you don’t want to download your content, you don’t need to do anything. (The Download feature will be disabled after May 13, 2011.)

    So, basically… “unless you take action, all your videos will be deleted.” But then, a week later, Google changed its tune. In my inbox:

    Google Video users can rest assured that they won’t be losing any of their content and we are eliminating the April 29 deadline. We will be working to automatically migrate your Google Videos to YouTube. In the meantime, your videos hosted on Google Video will remain accessible on the web and existing links to Google Videos will remain accessible.

    This Google Video example is just one of many recent stories that suggest the web isn’t as permanent as we’re often led to believe. This past March, Yahoo Video removed all user-generated uploads from its site. When Cisco announced its plans to shut down its Flip Video business, it also announced that its companion FlipShare video sharing service “will no longer be supported past 12/31/2013.”

    For his perspective on online video and digital heritage, Nora interviewed Jason Scott. Jason’s an archivist, technology historian, and filmmaker.

    http://www.cbc.ca/spark/2011/04/full-interview-jason-scott-on-online-video-and-digital-heritage/

    —Huffduffed by lach