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Tagged with “culture” (21)

  1. Words that Change the World | Radiolab | WNYC Studios

    Susan Schaller believes that the best idea she ever had in her life had to do with an isolated young man she met one day at a community college. He was 27-years-old at the time, and t…

    https://www.wnycstudios.org/story/91728-words-that-change-the-world

    —Huffduffed by lach

  2. Is the Australian accent lazy? - Myf Warhurst - ABC Radio

    Judgements about accents usually have more to do with class and race than inclination.

    https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/myf-warhurst/lazy-accents/10930122?fbclid=IwAR2mrU20uv-vDXqXe_ExKM_jLp9irmasuW2x8-qgdO9gn-9uZ9N_7vsAk8w

    —Huffduffed by lach

  3. Cultures of Energy: Ep. #14 - Lawrence English

    This week Cultures of Energy welcomes the brilliant (and fully certified) sound artist and composer Lawrence English to the podcast. Lawrence explains his relational approach to listening and how he became interested in the practice of field recording. We discuss the difference between hearing and listening, field recording as a political act, aesthetics of signal and noise, and how different ears have different horizons of listening. As a non-linear medium, Lawrence emphasizes the endlessness and promiscuousness of sound and how listening can help us reconnect to our immediate environments and to the world at large. Relish the incidental! In our final segment, we mix for your audition and pleasure several clips from Lawrence’s 2012 field recording collection, Songs Of The Living And The Lived In. See if you can recognize the Antarctic fur seal sleeping, Amazonian howler monkeys, Cormorants flocking at dusk, Australian chiroptera, Adele penguin chicks, Antarctic fur seals very much awake, white-throated toucans’ dawn display and a trigona carbonaria hive invasion.

    http://cenhs.libsyn.com/ep-14-lawrence-english

    —Huffduffed by lach

  4. Comedians with a cause - Religion and Ethics Report - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    Are our comedians dissidents or preachers running the establishment line?

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/religionandethicsreport/sanctimonious-comedians/7268520

    —Huffduffed by lach

  5. Slate’s Culture Gabfest call-in show, in which topics range from the effects of globalization on cultural diversity to the nuances of chicken husbandry.

    A special call-in edition of Slate’s Culture Gabfest, in which topics range from globalization to chicken husbandry.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/podcasts/culturegabfest/2013/09/slate_s_culture_gabfest_call_in_show_in_which_topics_range_from_the_effects.html

    —Huffduffed by lach

  6. Eating myself

    Exploring our society’s obsession with food as a marker of our identity and why we still feel empty despite all the sumptuous cuisines. What we eat is supposed to indicate who we are — for example, eating organic means you’re ethical; eating blowfish sashimi means you’re adventurous; grating white truffle on your pasta means you’re sophisticated. In fact, food has been so thoroughly colonised by commentary and narrative in our consumer-driven culture that what we eat is becoming less and less about nutrition or fuel for the body but more about consuming symbolism and meaning — like social status and identity.

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/360/eating-myself/3133662

    —Huffduffed by lach

  7. ETHICS MATTER: A Conversation with Peter Singer

    Utilitarian philosopher Peter Singer lives up to his beliefs, giving away a significant percent of his income to alleviate absolute poverty, and bringing animal rights into the expanding moral circle.

    http://www.policyinnovations.org/ideas/audio/data/000619

    —Huffduffed by lach

  8. Why more women are paying for lip service - The Science Show - ABC Radio National (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

    More girls and young women are undergoing labiaplasty. Gemma Sharp hopes to find out why.

    It’s described as the Barbie doll look, a pre-pubescent look. Shaven pubic hair, and surgery to reduce the size of the labia. But it’s only popular amongst girls and young women from some western cultures. For others, the reverse is desirable. Gemma Sharp is investigating the social and cultural influences driving girls and women to seek out labiaplasty. Gemma hopes to speak to more women who have undertaken surgery, and those considering surgery.

    Guests:
    Gemma Sharp, PhD Candidate, Department of Clinical Psychology, Flinders University, Adelaide SA

    Natalie Starkey, Cosmochemist, Planetary and Space Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes UK

    Further Information:
    Gemma Sharp at Flinders University (http://www.flinders.edu.au/people/gemma.sharp)
    Natalie Starkey (http://www.nataliestarkey.com/)
    The Centrefold Project (http://www.thecentrefoldproject.org/)
    Jezebel: Hungry Beast; The Labiaplasty You Never Knew You Wanted (http://jezebel.com/5535356/the-labiaplasty-you-never-knew-you-wanted-[nsfw])

    http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/scienceshow/why-more-women-are-paying-for-lip-service/5064500

    —Huffduffed by lach

  9. Fan is a Tool-Using Animal

    What happens when you build a nice website, and a real community shows up that doesn’t meet your expectations?

    Since the earliest days of Usenet, fandom has wandered the Internet, finding remarkable ways to assemble websites, plug-ins, and online forums into tools for sharing and organizing erotic fiction. Often ostracized and ridiculed for their hobby, this community of rather gentle people has learned to work with the materials at hand, building for themselves what they could not get from others, in the process creating a culture of collaboration and mutual respect other online projects can only envy.

    Fans are inveterate classifiers, and the story of how they have bent websites to their will (in a process reminiscent of their favorite works) may change the way you think about online communities, or at the very least, about librarians.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/maciej/

    —Huffduffed by lach

  10. Tavi Gevinson: Tavi’s World

    Tavi Gevinson was 11 when she kicked off her writing career with a fashion blog called Style Rookie.

    She had smart, sharp observations on fashion and visual style and the usual girl things that an 11 year old is obsessed with and she had an audience. And it was big. They were pre-teens and teenagers who had someone from their cohort who spoke to them.

    Gevinson was soon reporting on Fashion Weeks in Paris, London and New York and quickly got up the noses of the fashion editors and style queens. Who was this upstart 11 year old?

    Your first response may be to immediately dislike someone this young… with talent; and you might immediately assume that she’s as obnoxious as some soapie star. You’d be wrong. Tavi is now 17. Though it’s 17 going on 48 or 50.

    She’s smart, witty, erudite, with a good line in self-deprecating patter.

    She was a keynote speaker at the Melbourne Writers Festival and she packed out the Athanaeum Theatre with young women wearing ‘Tavi headgear’ the bunches of roses that she used to wear when she was 11 or 12, and their mums and the odd dad.

    Here, she’s giving her ‘fangirl’ keynote speech.

    http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2013/09/09/3840224.htm

    —Huffduffed by lach

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