kyran / tags / product

Tagged with “product” (9)

  1. Meet Pieter Levels, He is Launching 12 Startups in 12 Months

    When I set to work building my first digital product I had no idea about the term MVP (minimum viable product) and it took me 9 months to build and launch. Fast forward 3 years to my latest project VelocityPage and it took us 14 months from start to launch — mind you the 3 of us did all have businesses to run and clients to keep happy, but still…

    Building and launching projects based on the MVP model is all the rage these days. Still most people tend to talk MVP and  put off launching their projects until they are way beyond minimum viable.

    Tweet This Quote: I’m focusing on finishing my stuff. Not talking, not reading, but finishing and launching.

    Enter Pieter Levels or Levels as he goes by, 28-year old artist and entrepreneur from Amsterdam.  Levels has undertaken to build 12 startups in 12 months.  He is the first to admit that the projects he is launching are not officially startups per se, because it takes years and years to build a viable business. That being said,  he is going from idea to launch without hesitation and already has a fairly large success under his belt: NomadList.io.

    This is not Levels first venture. While attending university he founded a YouTube channel to promote his own music and has grown that channel to over 100 million views.  The revenue from this channel helped fund his way through school, but after he was finished he discovered the digital nomad lifestyle.

    This is a great conversation with a young, smart and abitious guy. Let’s get to it.

    What you will learn in this episode:

    What too many people are focused on and what they whould be doing instead.

    How you can easily launch a MVP startup every month too.

    You will never reach perfection. Ever.

    Discipline yourself to do something with this one trick.

    Why you need to take distance from your product and your ideas.

    Taking a more rational approach to your product and focus outward not inward.

    Level’s far out statement about the internet and ideas.

    Resources mentioned in this episode:

    Pieter Levels blog

    Levels on Twitter

    NomadList

    Panda Mix Show (Level’s YouTube channel) 

    Trello 

    Thanks for Listening!

    If you enjoyed the show please feel free share on social media using the button you find on this page.

    The fastest and best way for us to build up our audience is with iTunes reviews from you.  It will only take you 2 minutes or less to help. Please head over to iTunes and leave a quick rating and review of the show by clicking the link below.  Thank you so much!

    Leave a review for the Podcast

    http://hacktheentrepreneur.com/levels-launching-12-startups-12-months/

    —Huffduffed by kyran

  2. Meet Pieter Levels, He is Launching 12 Startups in 12 Months

    When I set to work building my first digital product I had no idea about the term MVP (minimum viable product) and it took me 9 months to build and launch. Fast forward 3 years to my latest project VelocityPage and it took us 14 months from start to launch — mind you the 3 of us did all have businesses to run and clients to keep happy, but still…

    Building and launching projects based on the MVP model is all the rage these days. Still most people tend to talk MVP and  put off launching their projects until they are way beyond minimum viable.

    Tweet This Quote: I’m focusing on finishing my stuff. Not talking, not reading, but finishing and launching.

    Enter Pieter Levels or Levels as he goes by, 28-year old artist and entrepreneur from Amsterdam.  Levels has undertaken to build 12 startups in 12 months.  He is the first to admit that the projects he is launching are not officially startups per se, because it takes years and years to build a viable business. That being said,  he is going from idea to launch without hesitation and already has a fairly large success under his belt: NomadList.io.

    This is not Levels first venture. While attending university he founded a YouTube channel to promote his own music and has grown that channel to over 100 million views.  The revenue from this channel helped fund his way through school, but after he was finished he discovered the digital nomad lifestyle.

    This is a great conversation with a young, smart and abitious guy. Let’s get to it.

    What you will learn in this episode:

    What too many people are focused on and what they whould be doing instead.

    How you can easily launch a MVP startup every month too.

    You will never reach perfection. Ever.

    Discipline yourself to do something with this one trick.

    Why you need to take distance from your product and your ideas.

    Taking a more rational approach to your product and focus outward not inward.

    Level’s far out statement about the internet and ideas.

    Resources mentioned in this episode:

    Pieter Levels blog

    Levels on Twitter

    NomadList

    Panda Mix Show (Level’s YouTube channel) 

    Trello 

    Thanks for Listening!

    If you enjoyed the show please feel free share on social media using the button you find on this page.

    The fastest and best way for us to build up our audience is with iTunes reviews from you.  It will only take you 2 minutes or less to help. Please head over to iTunes and leave a quick rating and review of the show by clicking the link below.  Thank you so much!

    Leave a review for the Podcast

    http://hacktheentrepreneur.com/levels-launching-12-startups-12-months/

    —Huffduffed by kyran

  3. 9: The Summer of ‘99

    Christina Warren and Casey Liss join Moisés to relive their mutual past in video game retail. Back in the days of VMUs, GD-ROMs, Product Protection Plans, and pre-internet consoles, it was the Wild West. Part 1 of 2Pictured: FuncoLand #23 in Mesquite, TX."The Society of the Shrinked Wrap" will return in Part 2, "The Key Holder" (Thank You For Calling! #10).An "extended cut" combination of both episodes will appear in the Master Feed (iTunes) as "Trouble in Pikachu City". Let us know if you like that sort of thing.SPONSORSHover: get 10% your purchase when signing up at Hover.com using offer code GLENGARRYDrobo: mass storage for the masses. Use offer code MOISES for $50 off Drobo 5D or 5NIgloo: an intranet you'll actually like and use. Visit the link to learn more and support the show. It's free for up to 10 users!PANELISTSChristina Warren is the Senior Tech Analyst at Mashable. She's also a big-time film nerd. Big. Time.Casey Liss writes software and is one-third of Accidental Tech Podcast (ATP if you're nasty).SHOW NOTESMoisés sings an acapella, truncated version of his new take on a Bionic theme song at the end of Bionic 94.Even for novelty value, the Virtual Boy, CD-i, and Jaguar aren't worth it. Well, maybe the Jaguar edition of Aliens vs. Predator.Babbage's, Electronics Boutique, and FuncoLand used to exist, I swear. Now there is only Zuul (Gamestop).Charles BabbageBabbage's has no Wikipedia page, so here's a great Ars Technica piece about the chain.Want to know FuncoLand? Learn the G.A.M.E.S. process before proceeding (part 1 and part 2). Moisés remembers this hilarious ripoff of Tron or Captain N: The Game Master or (probably) both vivdly…from his nightmares.This guy is an example of the sort of EB employee Moisés used to hate and still does. The Christina-type were always awesome. ThisGuy-type were the worst, even though he points out some of the FuncoLand-patented sales tactics and procedures.The Funcoland uniform was those green polo shirts and khakis you see in the video. If you came to work in jeans three times, you could actually be fired.This is "FuncoLand #23", where Moisés worked for most of his high school years. It has since become "GameStop #543".If you didn't experience the Dreamcast, you haven't lived. It won't die.The Neo Geo Pocket Color was a great idea, horrendously mis-marketed and had very little worthwhile software.Fingerboards were the bomb diggity, bro! Check these STUNTZ MOVEZ. and practice your movez anywhere!Seriously, Power Stone (and Power Stone 2) and Ecco: Tides of Time and Chu Chu Rocket and Crazy Taxi and Shenmue and…lots of Dreamcast games are really great, but forgotten.A fun story about Dreamcast launch, which involves a creepy guy in a van.Final Fantasy VIII had a Collectible Card Game (CCG) called Triple Triad built into the game, and yes, they actually made physical cards. There is a Flash adaptation of the game!Superman 64 was bad. Very, very bad.Star Wars: Episode One RACER was an awful game.

    http://www.esn.fm/tyfc/9

    —Huffduffed by kyran

  4. Core Intuition » Episode 123: Focus On Just One Thing

    Daniel and Manton discuss 37signals becoming Basecamp, spreading one’s self too thinly, choosing a product lineup, time management, and App.net’s new Kickstarter-like system: Backer.

    Download (MP3, 52 minutes, 25 MB)

    Downton Abbey – The British period soap opera set in a very large house.

    Two Big Announcements – 37signals announces its name change to Basecamp.

    Basecamp.com – New site centered around, you guessed it, Basecamp.

    Paper: Stories From Facebook – The new app from Facebook with a controversially generic name.

    Black Ink – Daniel’s Mac-based crosswords app.

    Gus Mueller – Our friend and the developer behind Flying Meat.

    Flying Meat – Gus’s company, which recently changed its focus exclusively to Acorn .

    VoodooPad – Gus’s former desktop wiki app, now a product of Plausible Labs .

    Backer – New crowdfunding service from App.net directed at financing specific software features.

    Kickstarter – The popular crowdfunding service geared more towards physical rewards.

    My Nightmare App – Daniel’s 2006 critique of an overly-ambitious crowd-specified app design contest.

    Sponsored by the PDFpen Family from Smile. For all your PDF editing needs.

    http://www.coreint.org/2014/02/episode-123-focus-on-just-one-thing/

    —Huffduffed by kyran