korbinian / tags / social

Tagged with “social” (7)

  1. BBC - Podcasts - Secret History of Social Networking

    It's a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones traces the hidden story of social networking, from the early days of computing and the 60s counterculture through to the businesses worth billions today. From their roots in utopian experiments in California, online social networks spread around the world. In the past few years companies such as Facebook and Twitter have captivated millions of users. But what will be the next big thing in social networking, and how is it changing our lives? This series was originally broadcast in three weekly parts from 26 January 2011.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/shsn

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  2. BBC - Podcasts - Secret History of Social Networking

    It's a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones traces the hidden story of social networking, from the early days of computing and the 60s counterculture through to the businesses worth billions today. From their roots in utopian experiments in California, online social networks spread around the world. In the past few years companies such as Facebook and Twitter have captivated millions of users. But what will be the next big thing in social networking, and how is it changing our lives? This series was originally broadcast in three weekly parts from 26 January 2011.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/shsn

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  3. Christian Crumlish: Designing Social Interfaces: 5 Principles, 5 Practices, 5 Anti-Patterns

    As we use social tools on the web, design patterns are emerging. Social design must be organic, not static, emotional, not data-driven. A social experience builds on relationships, not transactions.

    In 2008, Yahoo!'s Christian Crumlish introduced the idea of social design patterns to BayCHI. He returns in 2010 to share what he learned over two years. With his Yahoo! colleague Erin Malone, Christian created a wiki to gather social design patterns and published a snapshot of the wiki in book form.

    Among the many principles of social design, Christian presents five:

    • Pave the Cowpaths: Watch what people do, then support and adapt to that behavior.
    • Talk Like a Person: Use a conversational voice. Be self-deprecating when an error occurs. Ask questions.
    • Be Open: Embrace open standards. Support two-way exchange of data with other applications.
    • Learn from Games: Give your application fun elements, like collecting and customization.
    • Respect the Ethical Dimension: Understand the expectations people have in social situations and abide by them.

    Christian then describes five practices:

    • Give people a way to be identified and to characterize themselves.
    • Create social objects that give people context for interaction.
    • Give people something to do, and understand the continuum of participation, from lurkers to creators to leaders.
    • Enable a bridge to real life.
    • Let the community elevate people and the content they value.

    Finally, he discusses five anti-patterns, commonly-used design choices that appear to solve a problem but that can backfire and pollute of the commons. Examples:

    • The Cargo Cult: Copying successful designs without understanding why they are successful.
    • Breaking Email: Sending an email alert, but rejecting or silently discarding the reply.
    • The Password Anti-Pattern: Asking people for their password to another service encourages poor on-line hygiene.
    • The Ex-Boyfriend Bug: Connecting people who share a social circle but who have reasons to avoid each other.
    • The Potemkin Village: Building groups with no members. Instead, let people gather naturally.

    Christian stresses that social design is an ecosystem in which designers must balance many trade-offs. Not every design pattern applies to every application, but good designers can use patterns to strike a balance that works.

    http://chi.conversationsnetwork.org/shows/detail4459.html

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  4. Closing the gap between people’s online and real life social network – Paul Adams

    From IA Summit 2010:

    In the next few years, the most successful social media experiences will be the ones that understand how our offline and online worlds connect and interact. But our tools are still crude. The good news is that despite the complexity involved in understanding human relationships, we can study offline and online communication and create design principles to support what we find. In his presentation, Paul Adams speaks about what he has learned from over two years of research into people’s online and offline relationships.

    From http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/ia-summit-10-day-2

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  5. Connected: The amazing power of social networks and how they shape our lives

    RSA Keynote

    The notion of the self-determining, self-directed individual is rapidly losing favour as we discover ever more about the way humans operate, behave, and make decisions in social contexts.

    Social scientist Nicholas A. Christakis visits the RSA to explain how our social networks influence our ideas, emotions, health, relationships, behaviour, politics, and so much more. It transpires that your colleague's husband's sister can make you fat, even if you don't know her. And a happy friend is more relevant to your happiness than a bigger income. Our connections - our friends, their friends, and even their friends' friends - have an astonishing power to influence everything from what we eat to who we vote for. And we, in turn, influence others. Our actions can change the behaviours, the beliefs, and even the basic health of people we've never met.

    In showing how we are all unavoidably and inextricably connected, Christakis presents a picture of an unknowingly collaborative society, and what we can do to best utilise the power of these networks.

    Chair: Matthew Taylor, chief executive, RSA

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  6. How to Control and Change Individual Behaviour: the world as installation

    Changing individual behavior is a major stake for policies and management, but humans think and act as social beings rather than rational agents. The lecture will introduce Installation Theory, the principles of which can be used for governance. Saadi Lahlou is director of the Institute of Social Psychology at LSE.

    —Huffduffed by korbinian