Tagged with “k” (145)

  1. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can't link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  2. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    Today my guest on Singularity 1 on 1 is award winning science fiction author Charles Stross. It was his seminal singularity book Accelerando that not only won the 2006 Locus Award (in addition to being a finalist for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and on the final ballot for the Hugo Award) but was also at least in part responsible for my launching of SingularitySymposium.com and SingularityWeblog.com.

    During my conversation with Charlie we discuss issues such as: his early interest in and love for science fiction; his work as a “code monkey” for a start up company during the first dot com boom of the late nineties and the resulting short sci fi story Lobsters (which eventually turned into Accelerando); his upcoming book Rule 34; his take on the human condition, brain uploading, the technological singularity and our chances of surviving it.

    Charles Stross, 46, is a full-time science fiction writer and resident of Edinburgh, Scotland. The winner of two Locus Reader Awards and winner of the 2005 and 2010 Hugo awards for best novella, Stross’ works have been translated into over twelve languages.

    Like many writers, Stross has had a variety of careers, occupations, and job-shaped-catastrophes in the past, from pharmacist (he quit after the second police stake-out) to first code monkey on the team of a successful dot-com startup (with brilliant timing he tried to change employer just as the bubble burst).

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  3. The Tendencies of Technology

    • Kevin Kelly, founder, Wired magazine
    • Nicholas Negroponte, founder, One Laptop Per Child
    • David Kirkpatrick, writer
    • Nick Bilton, writer, Bits Blog, New York Times
    • John Hockenberry, radio host, The Takeaway

    The recent changes that technology has made to books, reading, and the way we relate to each other are unprecedented and transformational. Tech guru Kevin Kelly, author of What Technology Wants; digital visionary Nicholas Negroponte; David Kirkpatrick, founder of Techonomy and author of The Facebook Effect; and The New York Time's Nick Bilton, author of I Live in the Future and Here's How It Works, discuss technology and its impact on how we live. Moderated by public radio's John Hockenberry.

    http://forum-network.org/lecture/tendencies-technology

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  4. BBC - Podcasts - Secret History of Social Networking

    It's a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones traces the hidden story of social networking, from the early days of computing and the 60s counterculture through to the businesses worth billions today. From their roots in utopian experiments in California, online social networks spread around the world. In the past few years companies such as Facebook and Twitter have captivated millions of users. But what will be the next big thing in social networking, and how is it changing our lives? This series was originally broadcast in three weekly parts from 26 January 2011.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/shsn

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  5. SitePoint Podcast #111: Responsive Web Design with Jeremy Keith

    Episode 111 of The SitePoint Podcast is now available! This week Louis Simoneau (@rssaddict) talks with Jeremy Keith (@adactio), a UK-based web designer and author of several books on web design. We talk about Jeremy's views on Responsive Web Design, and how Jeremy feels this is creating an exciting time to be a web designer.

    http://blogs.sitepoint.com/podcast-111-responsive-web-design-with-jeremy-keith/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  6. Kevin Kelly on technology evolving beyond us

    Kevin Kelly, a founding editor of Wired magazine, a former editor and publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, and one of the most compelling thinkers about technology today, talks about his new book, What Technology Wants. Make no mistake: the singularity is near. Kelly discusses the technium–a broad term that encompasses all of technology and culture–and its characteristics, including its autonomy and sense of bias, its interdependency, and how it evolves and self-replicates. He also talks about humans as the first domesticated animals; extropy and rising order; the inevitability of humans and complex technologies; the Amish as technology testers, selecters, and slow-adopters; the sentient technium; and technology as wilderness.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/10/19/kevin-kelly/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  7. Nietzsche today - is philosophy relevant to education?

    Some philosophical scholars believe the our education system should make the teaching of philosophy more of a priority, so that people can understand the basics of philosophy and better understand and critically evaluate the teachings of the world's most influential philosophers. We mined some philosophy experts on the matter and examined what potential impact a lack of philosophy has on how we contextualize philosophical ideas today.

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  8. BBC - Podcasts - Secret History of Social Networking

    It's a phenomenon which seems to have come from nowhere, but in fact computer-based social networks have been around for decades. In this three-part series the BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan Jones traces the hidden story of social networking, from the early days of computing and the 60s counterculture through to the businesses worth billions today. From their roots in utopian experiments in California, online social networks spread around the world. In the past few years companies such as Facebook and Twitter have captivated millions of users. But what will be the next big thing in social networking, and how is it changing our lives? This series was originally broadcast in three weekly parts from 26 January 2011.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts/series/shsn

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  9. Arthur C. Clarke, Alvin Toffler, and Margaret Mead on Man’s Future

    What does the future look like from the past? This exciting program with three people that could not better represent the intelligentsia of futurism circa 1970. This recording is from a radio program called “Sound on Film”, a series on films and the people who make them. This episode is entitled “2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?” Recorded May 7th, 1970. Joseph Gelman is the moderator.

    At the time of this recording Arthur C. Clarke had recently collaborated on the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick. Alvin Toffler’s mega-influential book, Future Shock, is about to be published. And Margaret Mead is the world’s foremost cultural anthropologist.

    An intriguing conversation that still has relevance today.

    2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?

    Length–54:18

    http://www.sfoha.org/arthur-c-clarke-alvin-toffler-and-margaret-mead-on-mans-future/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

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