korbinian / tags / book:title

Tagged with “book:title” (8)

  1. Charlie Stross on Singularity 1 on 1: The World is Complicated. Elegant Narratives Explaining Everything Are Wrong!

    Want to find out why Charlie Stross thinks that the singularity, if it happens at all, may not leave any room for humans? Check out his interview for www.SingularityWeblog.com

    Today my guest on Singularity 1 on 1 is award winning science fiction author Charles Stross. It was his seminal singularity book Accelerando that not only won the 2006 Locus Award (in addition to being a finalist for the John W. Campbell Memorial Award and on the final ballot for the Hugo Award) but was also at least in part responsible for my launching of SingularitySymposium.com and SingularityWeblog.com.

    During my conversation with Charlie we discuss issues such as: his early interest in and love for science fiction; his work as a “code monkey” for a start up company during the first dot com boom of the late nineties and the resulting short sci fi story Lobsters (which eventually turned into Accelerando); his upcoming book Rule 34; his take on the human condition, brain uploading, the technological singularity and our chances of surviving it.

    Charles Stross, 46, is a full-time science fiction writer and resident of Edinburgh, Scotland. The winner of two Locus Reader Awards and winner of the 2005 and 2010 Hugo awards for best novella, Stross’ works have been translated into over twelve languages.

    Like many writers, Stross has had a variety of careers, occupations, and job-shaped-catastrophes in the past, from pharmacist (he quit after the second police stake-out) to first code monkey on the team of a successful dot-com startup (with brilliant timing he tried to change employer just as the bubble burst).

    http://singularityblog.singularitysymposium.com/charlie-stross-on-singularity-1-on-1-the-world-is-complicated-elegant-narratives-explaining-everything-are-wrong/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  2. Kevin Kelly on technology evolving beyond us

    Kevin Kelly, a founding editor of Wired magazine, a former editor and publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, and one of the most compelling thinkers about technology today, talks about his new book, What Technology Wants. Make no mistake: the singularity is near. Kelly discusses the technium–a broad term that encompasses all of technology and culture–and its characteristics, including its autonomy and sense of bias, its interdependency, and how it evolves and self-replicates. He also talks about humans as the first domesticated animals; extropy and rising order; the inevitability of humans and complex technologies; the Amish as technology testers, selecters, and slow-adopters; the sentient technium; and technology as wilderness.

    http://surprisinglyfree.com/2010/10/19/kevin-kelly/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  3. Arthur C. Clarke, Alvin Toffler, and Margaret Mead on Man’s Future

    What does the future look like from the past? This exciting program with three people that could not better represent the intelligentsia of futurism circa 1970. This recording is from a radio program called “Sound on Film”, a series on films and the people who make them. This episode is entitled “2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?” Recorded May 7th, 1970. Joseph Gelman is the moderator.

    At the time of this recording Arthur C. Clarke had recently collaborated on the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey with Stanley Kubrick. Alvin Toffler’s mega-influential book, Future Shock, is about to be published. And Margaret Mead is the world’s foremost cultural anthropologist.

    An intriguing conversation that still has relevance today.

    2001–Science Fiction or Man’s Future?

    Length–54:18

    http://www.sfoha.org/arthur-c-clarke-alvin-toffler-and-margaret-mead-on-mans-future/

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  4. Clay Shirky and Cognitive Surplus

    From Future Tense with John Moe:

    Sometimes at night I’ll wonder what’s on TV. Surf around for a while, not find much, and get on the computer instead. There, I might update Facebook, tweet something on Twitter. And I’ll think, “It didn’t use to be like this.” Time away from work and responsibility used to be passive, we watched TV mutely, we read a book. We didn’t post videos to YouTube or edit Wikipedia. Online culture has meant that instead of just consuming culture, we also create it and share it. We don’t just watch Lost, we watch it and then go on message boards or even make our own videos.

    This is a shift detailed in Clay Shirky’s new book Cognitive Surplus: creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age. He teaches at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU and has been a big thinker on the way we work together online for many many years. We talk to him about what this shift means for society in the long term.

    http://futuretense.publicradio.org/episode/index.php?id=686751198

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  5. The Big Web Show 2: HTML5 with Jeremy Keith

    Dan and Jeffrey talk with Jeremy Keith, designer, writer, speaker, and author of HTML5 for Web Designers, a new book coming out in June of 2010. They discuss the goals and inspiration behind the book, as well as what HTML5 means for both web creators and those who consume the web, covering topics that range from structure to accessibility and implementation.

    http://5by5.tv/bigwebshow/2

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  6. Why It’s Hard to Admit to Being Wrong

    We all have a hard time admitting that we're wrong, but according to a new book about human psychology, it's not entirely our fault. Social psychologist Elliot Aronson says our brains work hard to make us think we are doing the right thing, even in the face of sometimes overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

    Elliot Aronson, co-author, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me); social psychologist; professor emeritus, psychology, University of California Santa Cruz.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12125926

    —Huffduffed by korbinian

  7. Richard Dawkins: The Greatest Show On Earth

    British biological theorist Richard Dawkins is perhaps the world's best known atheist. He is certain that we have evolution to thank for life on earth, not a creator. Evolution is the topic of his new book, "The Greatest Show On Earth." Dawkins says the book is his "personal summary of the evidence that the 'theory' of evolution is actually a fact - as incontrovertible a fact as any in science." He joins Doug on Tuesday to discuss the evidence for evolution.

    —Huffduffed by korbinian