kirsijona / kiira taylor

I whistle.

There are no people in kirsijona’s collective.

Huffduffed (8)

  1. #067: Freedom From Stuff | The Art of Simple

    About TshTsh is the founder of this blog and lives in Bend, Oregon with her husband and 3 kids. Her latest book is Notes From a Blue Bike, and believes a passport is one of the world’s greatest textbooks.

    Joshua Becker writes a blog called Becoming Minimalist, and that title describes well his journey: he hasn’t figured out all the ins and outs of minimalism… he’s becoming one. He and I chat about what it means to live simply by living with less. Both of us are parents, we both live in the real world, and we’ve both experienced the peace and satisfaction from getting rid of needless stuff and pursuing a life without consumption as a hobby.

    I also talk about safety while traveling with kids, since we’re gearing up for a year of world travel!

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    (If you’re reading this via email, head here to listen to the episode.)

    Show notes:

    Becoming MinimalistZen Habits: A Guide to Creating a Minimalist HomeThe thrift store can be your (nearly free) storage unitThe AoS podcast #65 with Nina Nelson (lives on a bus with her 4 kids)The Minimalist Mom: When You’re Not Married to a MinimalistJoshua’s booksTsh’s family’s plan for going around the worldFree-Range Kids

    Joshua on Twitter and Facebook

    And head to Audible to use the code mentioned in this episode for a free audiobook and 30-day trial.

    http://theartofsimple.net/67/

    —Huffduffed by kirsijona

  2. Ambient Location and the Future of the Interface

    In this presentation, Geoloqi co-founder Amber Case will take you on a journey through the history of calm technology, wearable computing, and how developers and designers can make apps “ambient” and inspire delight instead of constant interaction.

    This talk will focus on trends in wearable computing starting from the 1970’s-2010’s and how mobile interfaces should take advantage of location, proximity and haptics to help improve our lives instead of get in the way.

    http://2013.dconstruct.org/conference/amber/

    Amber Case is a researcher exploring the field of cyborg anthropology. How cool is that‽

    Amber is also the director of the Esri R&D Center in lovely Portland, Oregon. Her work there started when Esri acquired Geoloqi, her startup that provided location functionality for mobile apps.

    Amber is a captivating presence when she’s geeking out about the interaction between humans and technology, hence her barnstorming appearances at TED and South by Southwest.

    Right now, her work involves non-visual augmented reality, the future of location, and reducing the amount of time and space it takes for people to connect.

    Her home on the web is caseorganic.com.

    —Huffduffed by kirsijona

  3. A Seattle Biologist’s Cookbook Research

    Phil Levin, a biologist at the Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, talks to Michele Norris about the method used for one of his latest research projects. Levin wanted to examine the area’s seafood history to better understand the decline of rockfish, three species of which were put on the endangered species list last month. So he and a colleague looked at more than 100 cookbooks published in Oregon and Washington between 1885 and 2007. While he didn’t find many rockfish recipes, he did discover some patterns in Northwest cooking.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=126985092

    —Huffduffed by kirsijona

  4. Scott Cairns part 1: Trusting Language to Lead Me | religion report

    In the first of two interviews, Scott Cairns talks about what it’s like to write poetry as a professional. We also discuss the connections between poetry and religion, and Scott’s own journey from fundamentalist Protestantism to Eastern Orthodox Christianity. He is a professor of creative writing at the University of Missouri.

    —Huffduffed by kirsijona