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kfeighery / Keith feighery

There are five people in kfeighery’s collective.

Huffduffed (53)

  1. The Largest Prime Number

    Episode three of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    Think of a number. Any number. Chances are you haven’t plumped for 2 to the power of 13,466,917 -1. To get this, you would need to keep multiplying 2 by itself 13,466,917 times, and then subtract 1 from the result. When written down it’s 4,053,900 digits long and fills 2 telephone directories. So, as you can imagine, it’s not the kind of number you’re likely to stumble over often. Unless you’re Bill Gates checking your bank statement at the end of the month.

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  2. Game Theory

    Episode five of Another Five Numbers, the BBC radio series presented by Simon Singh.

    In 2000, the UK government received a windfall of around £23 billion from its auction of third generation (3G) mobile phone licences. This astronomical sum wasn’t the result of corporate bidders "losing their heads", but a careful strategy designed to maximise proceeds for the Treasury.

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  3. Terence Tao on the Beauty of Prime Numbers

    Former child prodigy Terence Tao has become one of the world’s greatest living mathematicians. At 24 he became the youngest person ever appointed full professor at UCLA, and at the tender age of 31 he was awarded mathematics’ highest honour, the Fields Medal.

    Back in his childhood home of Australia, he visited the ANU to deliver this fascinating talk about one of his favourite subjects, prime numbers.

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  4. Happiness around the World: the paradox of happy peasants and miserable millionaires

    The determinants of happiness are remarkably similar around the world, in countries as different as Afghanistan, the U.S, and Chile. Income matters to happiness but only so much; friends, freedom, and employment are good for happiness, while crime, poor health, and divorce are bad. Paradoxically, however, people in places like Afghanistan can be as happy as those in much wealthier and safer ones like Chile. One explanation is the remarkable human capacity to adapt to adversity and hardship. While adaptation may be a good thing for individual wellbeing, it can also result in collective tolerance for bad equilibrium which are difficult for societies to escape from.

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  5. Creating A World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism from UChannel Podcast

    Nobel Peace Laureate Muhammad Yunus outlines his vision for a new business model

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  6. How to Choose a Web App Business Model

    From Carsonified

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  7. New Think for Old Publishers

    This is not a discussion of whether ebooks are killing treebooks, or whether it’s possible to get cozy with an Amazon Kindle. It’s about how participatory culture and the online world interact with good old book publishing. Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody, Deborah Schultz and fellow panelists will share with the audience a variety of perspectives on what’s going right and what’s going wrong in publishing, assess success of recent forays into marketing digitally, digital publishing, and what books and blogs have to gain from one another. Penguin Group (USA), which houses some 40 plus imprints and publishes an extremely broad variety of physical and digital products, everything from William Gibson’s first ebook in the 90’s to Michael Pollan’s In Defense of Food to Charlaine Harris’ Sookie Stackhouse novels (the source for HBO’s True Blood) is deeply involved in exploring ways that old and new media might better collaborate. Audience members are invited to speak up about what they think book publishers could / should be doing to better provide relevant information and content to blogs, websites, and online communities. Come tell old media what you want and how you want it.

    From http://2009.sxsw.com/taxonomy/term/44

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  8. Shirky on Coase, Collaboration and Here Comes Everybody

    Clay Shirky, author of Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations, talks about the economics of organizations with EconTalk host Russ Roberts. The conversation centers on Shirky’s book. Topics include Coase on the theory of the firm, the power of sharing information on the internet, the economics of altruism, and the creation of Wikipedia.

    From http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2008/10/shirky_on_coase.html

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  9. On Point: Claude Levi-Strauss

    At the imperial dawn of the 20th century, there was the “civilized” world and the “savage” or “primitive” world, and one felt free to judge the other.

    By the century’s end, the whole idea of primitive man as separate from civilized man was pretty well gone. And with it, the “savage mind.”

    Much of the banishing was the work of the towering anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss. Levi-Strauss has died at 100 in his native France. We are all, he said, driven by deep myth and common structures of thinking — even to our own extinction.

    This hour, On Point: The mind and work of Claude Levi-Strauss.

    http://www.onpointradio.org/2009/11/claude-levi-strauss

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

  10. Noam Chomsky: Philosophies of Language and Politics

    Noam Chomsky, Professor, Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, MIT

    Larry Bensky, Former National Affairs Correspondent, Pacifica Radio; Host, "Sunday Salon" KPFA; Professor at Stanford, California State University East Bay and Berkeley City College - Moderator

    World-renowned intellectual Chomsky has been pushing change in language, politics and culture for decades.

    This program was recorded in front of a live audience at the Commonwealth Club of California on October 6th, 2009.

    —Huffduffed by kfeighery

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