subscribe

kevinpacheco / Kevin Pacheco

There are no people in kevinpacheco’s collective.

Huffduffed (1718)

  1. Gillmor Gang 08.19.17: Ah-Clem

    The Gillmor Gang — Philip Proctor, Frank Radice, Kevin Marks, Denis Pombriant, and Steve Gillmor. Recorded live Saturday, August 19, 2017. The Firesign Theatre’s Phil Proctor joins the Gang. Topics preclude: will the realDonaldTrump please step down, what is reality, Siri’s Easter egg, and other mysteries from the vaults of time.

    @stevegillmor, @FIRESIGNPHIL, @DenisPombriant, @fradice, @kevinmarks

    Produced and directed by Tina Chase Gillmor @tinagillmor

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/20/gillmor-gang-ah-clem/

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  2. Forget Tough Passwords: New Guidelines Make It Simple : All Tech Considered : NPR

    We’ve been told to create passwords that are complicated, to change them regularly and to use different ones for each app or site. But the latest advice is to keep them simple, long and memorable.

    http://www.npr.org/sections/alltechconsidered/2017/08/14/543434808/forget-tough-passwords-new-guidelines-make-it-simple

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  3. Relay FM Q&A 2017

    Relay FM co-founders Myke and Stephen answer questions from listeners as part of their third-anniversary celebrations.

    Links:

    ===
    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Srwe01ylPHc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Tue, 15 Aug 2017 15:38:35 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  4. Gillmor Gang 08.13.17: Hope Springs

    The Gillmor Gang — Doc Searls, Denis Pombriant, Keith Teare, Frank Radice, and Steve Gillmor. Recorded live Sunday, August 13, 2017. The battle for the center screen — Facebook Watch, Disney v Netflix, Twitter turns the tables on cable news. And way back two weeks ago:

    G3: Care Bares recorded Thursday, July 27, 2017 with Mary Hodder, Elisa Camahort Page, Maria Ogneva, Francine Hardaway, and Tina Chase Gillmor.

    @stevegillmor, @dsearls, @kteare, @fradice, DenisPombriant

    Produced and directed by Tina Chase Gillmor @tinagillmor

    https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/14/gillmor-gang-hope-springs/

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  5. Mac Power Users #390: Tagging with Terpstra - Relay FM

    Brett Terpstra (drink!) joins David and Katie this week to talk about the state of tagging on Mac and iOS. We discuss uses of tags, developing a tagging scheme, what you can do with tags, the turbulent history and hopefully bright future.

    https://www.relay.fm/mpu/390

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  6. 2017/08/08: James Damore and his Google Memo on Diversity (complete)

    In this video, I talk to James Damore and another employee who wishes to remain anonymous about James’ memo regarding Google’s diversity programs and their overweening ideological basis. He was fired last night. That says everything that needs to be said.

    This means that the company that is arguably in charge of more of the world’s communication than any other has now fired a promising engineer for stating a series of established scientific truths. That’s worth thinking about.

    A fund-raiser for James has been established, here: https://www.wesearchr.com/bounties/ja

    Hate facts: references (full papers linked where possible):

    Sex differences in personality: http://bit.ly/2gJVmEp http://bit.ly/2vEKTUx Larger/large and stable sex differences in more gender-neutral countries: (Note: these findings runs precisely and exactly contrary to social constructionist theory: thus, it’s been tested, and it’s wrong). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1http://bit.ly/2uoY9c4 (Women’s) interest in things vs (men’s) interest in things: http://bit.ly/2wtlbzU http://bit.ly/2fsq7Ru The importance of exposure to sex-linked steroids on fetal and then lifetime development: http://bit.ly/2vP0ZLS Exposure to prenatal testosterone and interest in things (even when the ex…

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEDuVF7kiPU
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 09 Aug 2017 17:56:25 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with education

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  7. a16z Podcast: The Strategies and Tactics of Big

    What happens when companies grow exponentially in a short amount of time — to their organization, their product planning, their behavior towards change itself? In this "hallway conversation", a16z partners Steven Sinofsky and Benedict Evans discuss the business tactics and strategies behind four of the largest tech companies — Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon — and how they work from an org perspective. 

    From the outside, these giants can seem composed of disparate entities literally strewn around the globe; it can be hard (sometimes purposefully so) to understand or detect the strategy that knits them all together. But in fact each of these large companies have very specific approaches to organization and strategy, and what’s good for Google isn’t necessarily right for Amazon or Apple. Evans and Sinofsky discuss the rationale behind each company’s org, looking at the tactics and strategies that are best for the underlying platform, how each thinks of its varied product entities, and how their organizations are all designed differently around their core capabilities and products.

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/a16z/strategy-tactics-large-companies-management
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 07 Aug 2017 22:23:09 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  8. Full transcript: Niniane Wang and Joelle Emerson talk solutions to harassment on Too Embarrassed to Ask - Recode

    Wang and Emerson join Kara Swisher and Lauren Goode to answer your questions about where sexual harassment comes from and how to stop it.

    https://www.recode.net/2017/8/9/16118570/transcript-evertoon-ceo-niniane-wang-paradigm-founder-joelle-emerson-too-embarrassed-to-ask

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  9. Tyler Cowen on Stubborn Attachments, Prosperity, and the Good Society | EconTalk | Library of Economics and Liberty

    Russ Roberts: Let’s think about that just for a second. Why is it—and when I was at [the University of] Chicago in graduate school in the 1980s, in the late 1970s, Chicago had struggled in the late 1960s and 1970s with crime. And they thought about relocating—I think to Arizona. It’s interesting that they didn’t start a second campus. And then things got better. But—and they decided to stay. I think it was a threat to the city, basically: Rumor had it that the city punished Hyde Park, where the University is, for not supporting Mayor Daly and other Democratic candidates. So they would give them—they supported them in the election, but in the Primary they would always support the challenger. And so they’d give them lousy police service and lousy roads—no clearing—and garbage pickup. So the University created its own police department. Which was pretty effective. But they threatened to move—partially, I think just as a threat. But, why didn’t they—not move, but why don’t they create, why don’t universities create franchises, extend the brand name? It’s one thing to say, ‘Well, Stanford wouldn’t be Stanford if were 70,000 students.’ That’s true. But why isn’t there a Stanford East, or a Harvard West, or a Chicago South? Why don’t universities—or a George Mason West? You know, George Mason has a much better reputation than its sort-of on-paper quality—because it’s distinctive. And its economics department is a huge part of that. Why wouldn’t George Mason try to exploit that reputational advantage somewhere else outside of Virginia? Tyler Cowen: I think it’s hard to do. Keep in mind what makes George Mason, say, special, is faculty of a particular kind. So you can’t duplicate those faculty in a Star-Trek-like machine. You might hope to hire the equivalent. But to tell people, ‘Well, there’s this new school, George Mason West.’ And it’s starting with near-zero faculty and you’re the first one to go there; and the colleagues you really want to interact with, they are 3000 miles away. I’m not saying no one would take it. But it’s not such a compelling offer if faculty is a scarce asset. Keep in mind: Many schools do now have branches. Most commonly you see this branching into Singapore. There’s a bit into China. Some—George Mason has a program in Korea. These are all new. We’re not sure how they’ll go. I think some of them actually will work. So, the branching we’re seeing is into this high-demand area of Asia. And I think there’s also about admitting too many Asians into the main campus branch for a lot of schools. And this is a way around that. Russ Roberts: Yeah, but I think you are—obviously, the faculty is a key part. I don’t know how—it’s quite as irreplaceable or unduplicatable as you might want to think. But, you’d think there would be some faculty who might want to live somewhere else other than Fairfax. Tyler Cowen: I think that a Harvard/California could work. I believe normatively Harvard should do it. I see zero signs they are about to. It would mean a dilution of control, a lot of headaches, a lot of new legal issues. You know, some reputational risk. But you could increase the number of people getting into some version of Harvard by really quite a bit. And that would be a wonderful thing for the country. And the world. Russ Roberts: So, I’m going to suggest a simpler explanation for this. Which is: Nobody has an incentive to do it. The faculty like where they are, mostly. There’s no owner. The alums [alumni, alumns—Econlib Ed.] are something of a residual claimant. They are probably against this. They, as you say, they risk diluting their own reputational name. Tyler Cowen: That’s right. They are significant, the alums. Russ Roberts: Yup, very. But it’s just interesting how—it always bewilders my parents—that no one’s really—there’s no boss in a modern American university. The Provost or the President only give the illusion of control. It’s a very strange enterprise. And it’s interesting because it’s something we ought to think about given how important it is, or at least how important it seems to be in our lives—both not just material lives, in the economic growth that we’re talking about, but in other ways as well. Tyler Cowen: But these universities, they do take other value-maximizing actions, like trying to improve the sports team or treating their donors better or having the lawn look

    nice on graduation day. So, they’re not incapable of responding to incentives. So, I suspect this idea of control is quite central, and risk, and alums, and the administration and the board just not wanting the headaches. And it’s like when a lot of departments grow, the previous incumbents lose control. Some similar issues. Russ Roberts: But I really think it gets at the heart of what’s dysfunctional about the non-profit sector, in general—and there are many wonderful things about them, the non-profit sector; I’ve sung its praises many times on the program, so don’t misunderstand me. But the inevitable challenge of non-profits in my experience is that they want to grow. They just want to be bigger. They will sacrifice their mission, after a while. At first, the first founders of the organization and the early leaders are passionate about the mission; and they are very careful to make sure the mission is preserved. But after a while, the leaders care about just bigger. And they are willing to sacrifice the mission if bigger is the result. And that’s just because there’s no incentive for them to do something else, unfortunately, except for the passion of the people who care about that mission, either of the workers or the employees or the staff; sometimes the donors. The donors do care: that’s why they give, generally. But if you think about the modern American university, the amount of money that they are sitting on in the endowments is shocking, really, as a social phenomenon. Because I think most people have a romance about the university—that it’s created to help people and to allow people to educate themselves, and teach them, and help transform the world. And if that were true, they would do something really different from what they are doing. Tyler Cowen: I like the [?]

    of the new university called Minerva. I don’t know if you’ve heard of it. Russ Roberts: I have— Tyler Cowen: You spend 4 years abroad with peers in a setting—so, you live in like Istanbul, Buenos Aires. You learn things from living there, and then you take shorter, intense classes online with your group and receive instruction at a distance. That, too, is new. It’s too soon to judge. But I have some hope that that will be a success and lead to some alternative models and more experimentation. Russ Roberts: It’s just interesting as a parent of a 17-year-old and two other college students who are in traditional universities, that, the idea of a parent saying, ‘Oh, you ought to try this. This looks good,’ the way you might say if a new car model came out, you might encourage them to try, or a new style of clothing. The amount that’s at stake with your university degree is—at least it’s perceived to be quite high. And so I think the challenge that Minerva has, and other innovators, is getting people to jump who might otherwise go to a first rate brick-and-mortar university. And maybe not get the return from it that they could get at a place like this one. Tyler Cowen: I wish Harvard cared more about being bigger, actually. It seems to me, so many universities—they are willing to grow if they can grow in ways where they maintain some kinds of control. So, there’s like new facilities; there’s new external programs; there’s new, say, athletics; new initiatives that require more administrators. But, just for

    the school to be bigger—I’m used to George Mason, which has gone from a few thousand students to 34,000 and improved quality pretty much the whole way through. Not that many schools are doing that. I’m spoilt, in a way. I know it’s possible. Russ Roberts: Yeah. Well. It’s hard to steer those cats on the faculty. We know that.

    http://www.econtalk.org/archives/2017/08/tyler_cowen_on_2.html

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

  10. Defocused | Every Day is a Winding Refn (Episode 158)

    Referenced Works

    Drive

    Show Notes & Links

    Drive (2011) - IMDb

    Drive (2011 film) - Wikipedia

    Mistral (typeface) - Wikipedia

    audioBoom / Episode 13: Nicolas Winding Refn on the Music in Drive, Only God Forgives and The Neon Demon

    Episode 13: Nicolas Winding Refn on the Music in Drive, Only God Forgives and The Neon Demon — Soundtracking with Edith Bowman — Overcast

    The Driver (1978) - IMDb

    Ryan Gosling - Conan - YouTube

    Edgar Wright and Quentin Tarantino Hot Fuzz Commentary 2007 on Huffduffer

    https://www.theincomparable.com/defocused/158/

    —Huffduffed by kevinpacheco

Page 2 of 172Newer Older