kevinmarks / collective

There are two people in kevinmarks’s collective.

Huffduffed (4204)

  1. The free speech panic: how the right concocted a crisis – podcast | News | The Guardian

    Snowflake students have become the target of a new rightwing crusade. But exaggerated claims of censorship reveal a deeper anxiety at the core of modern conservatism

    https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/aug/10/the-free-speech-panic-how-the-right-concocted-a-crisis-podcast

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  2. E52 – Interview with Eric Meyer – Part 2

    Eric says that accessibility "“is a foundational principle of the web. Like literally the web is built on accessibility. The original specs don’t necessarily call it that, but that’s an organizing principle of the web. And to try to ignore it or overcome it is a lot like trying to paddle upstream”."

    https://a11yrules.com/podcast/e52-interview-with-eric-meyer-part-2/

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  3. E51 – Interview with Eric Meyer – Part 1

    Eric talks about accessibility, of course, and semantics, and frameworks, and more! The "web prioritises ubiquity over consistency and a lot of these– there have been a lot of attempts to prioritise consistency over ubiquity."

    https://a11yrules.com/podcast/e51-interview-with-eric-meyer-part-1/

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  4. Languages on the Brink – Can technology save our endangered languages?

    We can now record the world’s languages at an unprecedented rate, precisely at the moment they are most threatened. What does the future hold for language in the age of digital tech? At Melbourne Knowledge Week 2018, linguist and international guest of the festival Laura Welcher (The Long Now Foundation), Nick Thieberger (Pacific and Regional Archive for Digital Sources in Endangered Cultures) and Paul Paton (First Languages Australia) get together to discuss the future of language preservation. Date recorded: 7/5/2018

    ===
    Original video: https://soundcloud.com/knowledgemelbourne/languages-on-the-brink-can-technology-save-our-endangered-languages
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Aug 2018 20:22:21 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  5. CORB, BroadcastChannel, and the resting Switch face  |  Web  |  Google Developers

    Also spices, screen-touchers, and lasers.

    https://developers.google.com/web/shows/http203/podcast/corb-cast-switch-face

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  6. Chris D. Thomas: Are We Initiating The Great Anthropocene Speciation Event? - The Long Now

    The bad news (not news to most): Many wild species are under severe duress.

    The good news (total news to most): “Nature is thriving in an age of extinction.”

    Ecologist and evolutionary biologist Chris Thomas has examined a little-noticed phenomenon around the world, that as an unintentional byproduct of massive human impact, biodiversity is increasing in pretty much every region of the world. Evolution has sped up. Wild populations are on the move, sometimes in response to climate change, often hitch-hiking on us. Hybridization is rampant, leading at times to whole new species. The Anthropocene, evidently, is a mass speciation event.

    An ardent conservationist, Thomas makes the case that conservation efforts are far more effective when we acknowledge—and study— what nature is really up to, and work with it.

    Chris Thomas is a professor in the Department of Biology at the University of York in England and author of Inheritors of the Earth: How Nature Is Thriving in an Age of Extinction (02017).

    http://longnow.org/seminars/02018/jun/19/are-we-initiating-great-anthropocene-speciation-event/

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  7. Undoing forever: The implications of de-extinction | CBC Radio

    Extinction is supposed to be forever. But in labs around the world, scientists—using the latest biotechnology—are trying to bring extinct animals back to life. From passenger pigeons to woolly mammoths, Britt Wray delves into the science, the ethics, and the implications of de-extinction for all animals, including us humans.

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/undoing-forever-the-implications-of-de-extinction-1.2913981

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  8. Do We Need a New Internet?

    Britt and Ellie explore what the internet of the future could (or should) look like.

    All around the world, governments are increasingly looking at control of the internet; whether it’s to regulate content, hide or ban content or increase ownership of your data.

    Is this the opposite of what the internet was originally designed to be - a free, open and uncensored space?

    In this seventh episode, Britt Wray and Ellie Cosgrave meet the people who want to bring that dream back using their alternative internet networks. Together, they imagine what the internet could or should look like in the future.

    Cory Doctorow joins Britt and Ellie to navigate this huge subject as we meet former Wikileaks journalist James Ball, blockchain experts Stephen Tual and Juan Benet, Jilian York from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, security researcher Leonie Tanczer, Chaos Computer Club spokesman Linus Neumann, TOR developer Isis Agora Lovecruft and Mr C, co-founder of Hack Lab.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p05y10x8

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  9. Aliens Would Probably Like It If You Gave them Flowers | WIRED

    They might find beauty in the same things humans do, you never know.

    Alien invasion is a constant theme of Hollywood science fiction, from War of the Worlds to Independence Day. But Harvard psychologist Steven Pinker, author of the new book Enlightenment Now, argues that highly developed civilizations tend toward peace and tolerance, and that advanced aliens are much more likely to be friendly.

    “I think it’s not inconceivable that wars between countries will go the way of slave auctions and dueling, just be seen as too ridiculous for any reasonable country to engage in,” Pinker says in Episode 296 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “And maybe that’s the natural arc of civilizations, including ones on other planets.”

    But wouldn’t alien brains be so different from ours that it would make mutual understanding impossible? On the contrary, since aliens would have been subject to the same evolutionary pressures as us, they would probably possess an appreciation of science—and maybe even beauty—similar to ours.

    “It’s conceivable that other intelligences have a sense of beauty that is not wildly different from ours,” Pinker says, “because they too might be expected to be attuned to counter-entropic forces and patterns in nature.”

    An example of this is our appreciation of the bright colors and symmetrical configuration of many flowers. “Flowers are designed to attract bugs,” Pinker says, “but they also attract us, and our brains are pretty different from bugs’ brains.”

    But there are limits. Vast differences in culture and biology would definitely lead to some significant differences when it comes to art appreciation.

    “It may be pushing things to say that little green men from Alpha Centauri would groove to Thelonious Monk,” Pinker says. “I don’t think I’d push it that far.”

    Listen to the complete interview with Steven Pinker in Episode 296 of Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy (above). And check out some highlights from the discussion below.

    Steven Pinker on progress:

    “Nowadays in the most conservative part of the world, namely the Islamic Middle East and North Africa, in many ways they are as liberal, even a bit more liberal, than people of the same age in, say, Sweden or Norway in the early 1960s. At first when I saw that graph I just couldn’t believe it, what are you talking about? People in Libya today are more liberal than people in Sweden in the early sixties? But if you actually think about it, if you go back to people’s attitudes in the sixties, the idea of say gay marriage—you ask a Swede in 1960 what they thought of gay marriage, they’d think you were nuts. Or women’s equality. We tend to underestimate how much the world has changed, particularly when it comes to generation by generation turnover.”

    Steven Pinker on AI:

    “If Elon Musk was really serious about the AI threat he’d stop building those self-driving cars, which are the first kind of advanced AI that we’re going to see. Now I don’t think he stays up at night worrying that someone is going to program into a Tesla ‘take me to the airport the quickest way possible,’ and the car is just going to make a beeline across sidewalks and parks, mowing people down and uprooting trees, because that’s the way the Tesla interprets the command ‘take me by the quickest route possible.’ That’s just idiotic, you wouldn’t build a car that way, because that isn’t an example of artificial intelligence — plus he’d get sued and there’d be reputational harms. You’d test the living daylights out of it before you let it on the streets.”

    Steven Pinker on science fiction:

    “If you take Moral Philosophy 101, or even better you dive into the technical literature in moral philosophy in the philosophy journals, it’s kind of all science fiction. It’s ‘what would happen if …?’ I mean, it’s not very good science fiction, as literature, but it’s putting together an imaginary world and exploring the consequences, to see what you really deep down believe. A simple example is the trolley problem—you know, imagine there’s a hurtling trolley and if it continues on its way it’ll kill five workers on the track who don’t see it coming, but if you flip the switch it’ll be diverted and kill only one person. Should you flip the switch? And all kinds of variations that start to go into the realm of science fiction. But it’s these stretches of the imagination that clarify what you really believe. So science fiction and moral philosophy are often pretty similar.”

    Steven Pinker on academia:

    “Just yesterday I got a slew of letters after I published an article in the Wall Street Journal just mentioning climate change, and a lot of the readers wrote back and said, ‘Don’t tell me you believe in climate change. That just comes out of universities and everyone knows that there’s just a left-wing echo chamber in the universities.’ Now that’s total and utter nonsense, I know these people—the climate scientists and planetary scientists and geophysicists, and they are not left-wing fanatics—but when you’ve got the university culture developing a reputation for orthodoxy and suppression of controversy, which is true in some parts of the university, it taints the university system as a whole, to the detriment of the entire society.”

    https://www.wired.com/2018/02/geeks-guide-steven-pinker/

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  10. #239 - Oh Mercy on The Go-Betweens ‘Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express’ — Mr Jeremy Dylan

    Oh Mercy, aka Melbourne singer-songwriter Alexander Gow, joins me for our first examination of one of Australia’s most beloved bands, the Go-Betweens, and their album ‘Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express’.Alex talks about discovering the Go-Betweens in high school as he was just starting to write songs, their ‘inviting, un-elitist’ magic, Lindy Morrison’s amazing atypical drumming, the thread between the Go-Betweens and Burt Bacharach, whether Alex is a Grant or Robert guy, the influence of the humor and literary quality of Go-Betweens lyrics and the best thing about imitating greatness unsuccessfully.Plus, we talk about how he comes up with the unique titles of his records, why he still issues his albums on vinyl and what it’s like to have your records reviewed by your musical heroes.Oh Mercy’s latest album ‘Cafe Oblivion’ is out now.

    https://jeremydylan.net/podcast/bjwmc427r7ap6xzmdhd3lyyze5yha2

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