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kevinmarks / collective

There are two people in kevinmarks’s collective.

Huffduffed (4165)

  1. Stewart Brand on the Whole Earth Catalog’s Long Legacy over 50 years

    Original video: http://reinvent.net/events/event/stewart-brand-on-the-whole-earth-catalogs-long-legacy-over-50-years/
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 22 Jun 2018 02:05:03 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  2. Radio Replay: This Is Your Brain On Ads

    After you read this sentence, pause for a moment to think back on advertisements you first heard when you were a child.

    Perhaps you recall a favorite jingle or the catchphrase of a cereal mascot. You probably can remember more than just one.

    On this week’s radio replay, we look at the shelf life of commercials. According to University of Arizona researcher Merrie Brucks, an ad we watched when we were five years old can influence our buying behavior when we’re fifty.

    "Children are vulnerable to messages that are fun and sound good. Because their minds are so open to all of that. They’re open to everything," Merrie says.

    We discuss Brucks’ research about cereal commercials in the first portion of the show. Later in the program, we delve into the history of the advertising industry with Tim Wu, author of The Attention Merchants. In his book, Wu reveals the techniques media companies have developed to hijack our attention.

    "You go to your computer and you have the idea you’re going to write just one email. You sit down and suddenly an hour goes by. Maybe two hours. And you don’t know what happened," Tim says.

    "This sort of surrender of control over our lives speaks deeply to the challenge of freedom and what it means to be autonomous."

    https://www.npr.org/2018/05/18/612037491/radio-replay-this-is-your-brain-on-ads

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  3. 99% Invisible: Ten Thousand Years

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/ten-thousand-years/

    In 1990, the federal government invited a group of geologists, linguists, astrophysicists, architects, artists, and writers to the New Mexico desert, to visit the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. They would be there on assignment.

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the nation’s only permanent underground repository for nuclear waste. Radioactive byproducts from nuclear weapons manufacturing and nuclear power plants. WIPP was designed not only to handle a waste stream of various forms of nuclear sludge, but also more mundane things that interacted with radioactive materials, such as tools and gloves.

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  4. Hobby Horse Episode 11: Andy Baio has been eaten by a grue

    Andy Baio and his love of the text adventure.

    Andy Baio is a veteran of the early web, creator of waxy.org, upcoming.org, and playfic.com. He was the first CTO for Kickstarter and went on to create the XOXO Festival in Portland Oregon.

    He’s also into collecting original 1980s Infocom games and still plays them today despite owning modern computers and video cards that can do so much more.

    http://the.hobbyhorse.club/11

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  5. 314: Flexible Type Setting with Tim Brown - ShopTalk

    Tim Brown is our guest to talk about his new book coming soon called Flexible Typesetting from A Book Apart.

    http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/314-flexible-type-setting-tim-brown/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  6. Hobby Horse Episode 10: Marcin Wichary quit his job for his love of keyboards

    Our first "success story" (that is still in progress) where Marcin’s hobby became so important he quit his job to pursue writing full-time, to write his first book about the history of typewriters and keyboards.

    http://the.hobbyhorse.club/10

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  7. The Vault - 99% Invisible

    Svalbard is a remote Norwegian archipelago with reindeer, Arctic foxes and only around 2,500 humans — but it is also home to a vault containing seeds for virtually every edible plant one can imagine. The mountainside Crop Trust facility has thousands of varieties of corn, rice and more, serving as a seed backup for humanity. For each crop, there’s an envelope with 500 seeds.

    This featured episode explores an unusual reserve of invaluable resources. It is designed to be egalitarian, beyond everyday politics and international strife. Any nation can store seeds in the vault for free, making the vault a sort of world peace zone. South Korea’s seeds sit next to North Korea’s. Ukraine’s are right next to Russia’s. Protecting our food supply is one thing the whole world can get behind.

    The vault’s origins start with one man during World War II — a global existential crisis if ever there was one. His name was Nikolay Vavilov and he lived in what was then the Soviet Union. He grew up during some intense famines in eastern Europe, and he was determined to never let them happen again. As Vavilov began his work as a botanist during the 1920s, he developed an idea: maybe collecting the seeds, and understanding how crop diversity across the world works, could help to fight off crop failures and to prevent famines. Vavilov and a team began gathering hundreds of thousands of different kinds of seeds from 64 countries during more than 100 expeditions.

    Vavilov’s team continued his mission through the siege of Leningrad, which lasted almost two and a half years. More than a million people died — half of them from starvation alone. They persisted even when they were starving and the seeds they were protecting could have saved their lives. In total, twelve scientists perished protecting seeds. Vavilov himself starved to death in prison. But the seeds survived.

    The Svalbard vault is a direct descendant of this legacy, and the building in St. Petersburg where Vavilov first began his work is now the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry.

    The First Withdrawal

    ICARDA (International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas) facility in SyriaThe Svalbard Global Seed Vault may be the most famous such facility in the world, but it is not the only one. 99pi producer Emmett Fitzgerald looked into another seed bank in Syria, run by the organization ICARDA (International Center for Agricultural Research in Dry Areas). He spoke with the former director Mahmoud Solh. Like Nikolai Vavilov, when Dr. Solh was a young plant scientist he set off on his own seed collecting journey. He made his way through Central Asian countries including Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey and Afghanistan.

    Dr. Solh drove all over Afghanistan in a Jeep looking for wild lentils and chickpeas. The seeds he gathered were the beginning of the ICARDA collection. ICARDA stores seeds and breeds plants that can help farmers in dry parts of the world. They have one of the world’s largest collections of drought tolerant seeds, including thousands of varieties of barley, lentil, and fava beans.

    English: Formerly located just outside of Aleppo, Syria, ICARDA left its headquarters due to the war and re-established sites in Lebanon and Morocco. (J.Owens/VOA)For years this collection was stored in a facility in Aleppo, Syria, but when the violence in that country broke out in 2011 the plant scientists started to get worried about their seeds, and so they sent seeds to other seed banks around the world before they were forced to leave Aleppo.

    Cary Fowler, the founder of the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, ended up calling Dr. Solh and inviting him to store some ICARDA seeds up in the Norwegian Arctic. “We got them up to Svalbard,” he recalls, “and when it became clear that those researchers were not going to be able to go back to their institution and they had re-established themselves in Morocco and Lebanon … they asked for their seed collection back so they could re-establish their seed bank.”

    ICARDA seeds in storage at the Svalbard Global Seed VaultThis was the first time that anyone had taken seeds back out of Svalbard, and they used those seeds that had been stored in Svalbard to create two new seed banks, one in Morocco and one in Lebanon. Cary Fowler says this shows that the seed vault can function like a back-up hard drive. And he points out that when it comes to our food supply, the risk of not having good backup is really high. “In the past this would this kind of event would likely have led to extinction. And in this case I think it’s pretty clear that that would be the extinction of something terribly valuable to world agriculture … because in the future you can imagine that drought- and heat-tolerant varieties of wheat, barley … lentils … chickpeas  and such are going to be in high demand.”

    https://99percentinvisible.org/episode/the-vault/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  8. Allusionist 76. Across the Pond — The Allusionist

    Pavement/sidewalk; football/soccer; bum bag/fanny pack: we know that the English language is different in the UK and the USA. But why? Linguist Lynne Murphy points out the geographical, cultural and social influences that separate the common language.

    https://www.theallusionist.org/allusionist/across-the-pond

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  9. I/O chat with Monica Dinculescu  |  Web  |  Google Developers

    Informative mouth-words.

    In this episode we chat to Monica Dinculescu, who works on Chrome. We cover:

    The PWA starter kit. Using Redux outside of React. lit-element. The status of custom elements across browsers. HTML imports vs modules. When to use shadow DOM. CSS ::part and ::theme. What CSS working groups are like. Working on the emoji subcommittee. Dinosaurs vs sharks. 👯‍♂️. Also check out Monica’s I/O talk, building fast, scalable, modern apps with Web Components.

    https://developers.google.com/web/shows/http203/podcast/io-chats-monica

    —Huffduffed by adactio

  10. The History of the Web, and WordPress’s 15th Birthday — Draft Podcast • Post Status

    In this episode, Brian is joined by Jay Hoffmann — the owner and curator of The History of the Web, a timeline and history of the web — and they discuss the project, as well as WordPress’s 15 year arc of history.

    Welcome to the Post Status Draft podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher. Post Status Draft is hosted by Brian Krogsgard and co-host Brian Richards.

    In this episode, Brian is joined by guest-host Jay Hoffmann. Jay is the Lead Developer at Reaktiv Studios and the creator and curator of The History of the Web. It is a good time to discuss the history of the web with Jay, as WordPress is ready to celebrate its 15th birthday.

    Be sure to subscribe to Jay’s newsletter on the History of the Web website to receive new articles on such a fascinating project.

    Brian and Jay discuss his work at Reaktiv, his prior work at Sesame Street Workshop and Random House, and the project he’s worked on for two years now documenting the web’s timeline and history. It was a fun discussion on all fronts.

    https://poststatus.com/the-history-of-the-web-and-wordpresss-15th-birthday-draft-podcast/

    —Huffduffed by adactio

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