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Kevan / Kevan Davis

There are no people in Kevan’s collective.

Huffduffed (329)

  1. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Stoicism

    Melvyn Bragg explore Stoicism, the most influential philosophy in the Ancient World.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9fs

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  2. The Peoria Plague

    Hour-long zombie drama presented in the form of fictional news reports, from WUHN 106.9 Peoria IL, broadcast in the early 1970s.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  3. Ken Campbell on Education and Creativity

    Ken Campbell worked with Martin Robinson on Education and Creativity. As part of that project Ken spoke to teachers, the results of which we present here, in edited form. Part entertainment, part allegory, Ken argues that a good teacher gives your life a ‘spine’ around which all can grow. Crucially those who think creativity is all about freedom might be surprised to see it is more about constraints.

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIH7qbBb6eA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 10 Aug 2016 13:51:44 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  4. JBW 2014: Irving Finkel The Ark Before Noah

    Jewish Book Week 2014. British Museum curator Irving Finkel launches his book The Ark Before Noah. Event 27 February 2014 at Kings Place, London.

    ===
    Original video: https://vimeo.com/87785950
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 29 Jul 2016 18:46:35 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  5. BBC Radio 4 - Desert Island Discs, Vic Reeves

    Sue Lawley’s castaway this week is the comedian Jim Moir, best known by the name of his alter ego Vic Reeves. Jim was born in Leeds but soon moved to Darlington with his family. He attended the local school and left with one O level in Art. He fulfilled the expectations of his school by getting a job in a factory, completing his apprenticeship and working there for four years. However, he was bored so he moved to London with three friends. After trying a few different jobs he began running club nights - with music, acts and entertainment. He would hire a venue and the bands and he would be the compere.

    Jim decided to take on the persona of Vic Reeves as it gave him an excuse to act up. A comedy night came up and instead of booking three comedians, he decided to do the whole night himself. Vic Reeves’ Big Night Out was born. After teaming up with Bob Mortimer, a solicitor who had been in the audience of one of his shows, the show went from strength to strength. It was a huge success and TV rights were fought over by the BBC and Channel 4. Since then, he has appeared on both channels with a variety of programmes including The Smell of Reeves and Mortimer, Shooting Stars and Randall And Hopkirk (Deceased). The programmes have won BAFTA Awards for Originality and Best Live Performance plus British Comedy Awards.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: Lark Ascending by Vaughan Williams Book: Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome Luxury: Potato seeds

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  6. Restart Radio: Documentary photography of abandoned e-stuff

    We interviewed photographer Greg Jones about his charming photography project called “Still Works” to document the abandoned electronics and electricals in his south London neighbourhood.

    Over the course of a couple of years, Greg showed how his neighbours appeared to have carefully placed VCRs, microwaves, monitors, white goods outside their homes. He wonders whether most people wanted others to take them away for reuse. And he photographed notes left by some neighbours indicating just this.

    Greg believes that people still believe in the “real value” of e-stuff, in spite of the fact that we are pushed to perceive everything in terms of “relative value”.

    He shot this collection using an analog SLR dating from 1978.

    Then we discussed a couple of very popular articles in the Guardian about long-lasting appliances and consumption, and Janet’s visit to New York where she met with the Fixers Collective.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  7. BBC Radio 4 - In Our Time, Chromatography

    Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the origins, development and uses of chromatography. In its basic form, it is familiar to generations of schoolchildren who put a spot of ink at the bottom of a strip of paper, dip it in water and then watch the pigments spread upwards, revealing their separate colours. Chemists in the 19th Century started to find new ways to separate mixtures and their work was taken further by Mikhail Tsvet, a Russian-Italian scientist who is often credited with inventing chromatography in 1900. The technique has become so widely used, it is now an integral part of testing the quality of air and water, the levels of drugs in athletes, in forensics and in the preparation of pharmaceuticals.

    With

    Andrea Sella Professor of Chemistry at University College London

    Apryll Stalcup Professor of Chemical Sciences at Dublin City University

    And

    Leon Barron Senior Lecturer in Forensic Science at King’s College London.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  8. BBC Radio 4 - Front Row, Martin Parr’s exhibitions, Assemble at Tate Liverpool, Bradford Media Museum controversy, Morrissey as London’s mayor

    As the death is announced of production designer Sir Kenneth "Ken" Adam, director Nicholas Hytner remembers working with him on The Madness of King George III.

    Martin Parr, photographer and chronicler of British culture, gives John Wilson an early preview of the new show he has curated at the Barbican in London, Strange and Familiar: Britain as Revealed by International Photographers, as well another exhibition of his own photographs, Unseen City, in which he gives an unprecedented insight into the pomp and pageantry of the City of London.

    In a controversial move, Bradford’s National Media Museum is transferring its collection of 400,000 photographs and exhibits to London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. Colin Ford, the museum’s former director, joins John in the studio.

    Assemble, a collective of architects and designers, won the Turner prize last year for their urban regeneration project in Liverpool. They talk to John Wilson about Art Gym - their latest Merseyside collaboration - which has just opened at Tate Liverpool.

    Presenter: John Wilson Producer: Rebecca Armstrong

    download

    Tagged with martin parr

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  9. Computing Britain: LEO the Electronic Office

    Hannah Fry hears the incredible story of how a chain of British teashops produced the first office computer in the world.

    J Lyons and Company was the UK’s largest catering company, with 250 teashops across the country. They also owned their own bakeries, a tea plantation and haulage firm, as Dr Tilly Blyth from the Science Museum describes.

    By the 1950s, this vast business was drowning in paperwork. Lyons embarked on an ambitious new project to build a machine called LEO - the Lyons Electronic Office.

    Their office computer was based on the giant calculating machines being built inside UK universities to solve mathematical equations

    Sure, these machines could manage maths, but could they handle catering?

    Featuring archive from the British Library, the Science Museum and the LEO Society.

    Presented by Hannah Fry

    Produced by Michelle Martin

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

  10. A Week with Adam Buxton

    Sketch show pilot from 2008. Adam Buxton offers some personal observations from the past week in a mixture of stand-up, sketches, parodies, songs and intergenerational bickering.

    —Huffduffed by Kevan

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