ken / Ken Mickles

There are no people in ken’s collective.

Huffduffed (22)

  1. Tim Harford: A powerful way to unleash your natural creativity | TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript | TED

    TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript: What can we learn from the world’s most enduringly creative people? They "slow-motion multitask," actively juggling multiple projects and moving between topics as the mood strikes — without feeling hurried. Author Tim Harford shares how innovators like Einstein, Darwin, Twyla Tharp and Michael Crichton found their inspiration and productivity through cross-training their minds.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/tim_harford_a_powerful_way_to_unleash_your_natural_creativity/transcript

    —Huffduffed by ken

  2. Jaron Lanier: How we need to remake the internet | TED Talk

    In the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge — but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a "globally tragic, astoundingly ridiculous mistake" companies like Google and Facebook made at the foundation of digital culture — and how we can undo it. "We cannot have a society in which, if two people wish to communicate, the only way that can happen is if it’s financed by a third person who wishes to manipulate them," he says.

    https://www.ted.com/talks/jaron_lanier_how_we_need_to_remake_the_internet

    —Huffduffed by ken

  3. Bruce Sterling - How to Be Futuristic

    October 16, 02018

    The future is a kind of history that hasn’t happened yet. The past is a kind of future that has already happened. The present moment vanishes before it can be described. Language, a human invention, lacks the power to fully adhere to reality.

    We live in a very short now and here, since the flow of events in spacetime is mostly closed to human comprehension. But we have to say something about the future, since we have to live there. So what can we say? Being “futuristic” is a problem in metaphysics; it’s about getting language to adhere to an unknowable reality. But the futuristic quickly becomes old-fashioned, so how can the news stay news?

    Bruce Sterling is a futurist, journalist, science-fiction author, and culture critic. He is the author of more than 20 books including ground-breaking science ficiton and non-fiction about hackers, design and the future. He was the editor in 01986 of Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology (1986) which brought the cyberpunk science fiction sub-genre to a much wider audience. He previous spoke for Long Now about "The Singularity: Your Future as a Black Hole" in 02004. His Beyond the Beyond blog on Wired.com is now in its 15th year. His most recent book is Pirate Utopia.

    ###

    https://theinterval.org/salon-talks/02018/oct/16/how-be-futuristic-bruce-sterling

    —Huffduffed by ken

  4. Bruce Sterling: Speculative architecture (September 26, 2018)

    Hernan Diaz Alonso introduces Bruce Sterling, explaining that this lecture is part of a residency at SCI-Arc, including masterclasses with students.

    Bruce Sterling proposes to speculate about architecture in the 2040s and the 2050s, when the students in the room will be in their 50s. He reviews his longstanding engagement with architecture, and pauses to note the recent passing of Robert Venturi, characterizing him as the rare futurist whose works continue to be a source of inspiration.

    Sterling discusses current situations that suggest issues that could be significant in thirty years, including: •China’s terraforming projects in the South China Sea, and the Belt and Road Initiative. •Astana, Kazakhstan, which Sterling describes as neither Fatehpur Sikri nor Brasília, nor the future, but a possibility. •Dubai as a technocratic autocracy that will not become a hegemon but an entrepôt of futurity •Sterling discusses Estonia’s e-residency initiative as an architectural problem that that will become common in the future, requiring off-shore pop-ups promoting Virtual Estonia, physical bank/embassy registration sites, a physical headquarters within Estonia, plus the physical structures required by virtual enterprises. •In Estonia’s capital Tallinn, Sterling discovered another architectural problem of the mid-21st century: abandoned, failed megastructures, located in sites that will probably be flodded, such as the Lenin Palace of Culture and Sports (Raine Karp and Riina Altmäe, 1980). •Seasteading, which Sterling dismisses as impractical. •Sterling also criticizes efforts of architects to design around the problem of climate-change flooding as “architectural solutionism”. •Sterling considers one result of rising sea levels will be a global proliferation of unregulated squatter districts like Christiania, in Copenhagen: “wet favelas” detached from municipal services. •He notes push-back against Silicon Valley cultural imperialism (e.g. Uber and Airbnb) in places like Barcelona and Turin, as another issue that will grow in significance.

    Sterling argues that the most famous buildings of the mid-21st century will be older buildings, preserved in new ways, and retrofitted for new uses.

    He dismisses artificial intelligence design as “a kaleidoscope,” providing options without insight.

    He discusses Ikea’s Space10 research on autonomous food trucks, predicting that spaces will become mobile in the 21st century. He anticipates that the impact of autonomous cars will be profound: the autonomous car is regular car as the cell phone is to the landline.

    Though he admits that, since Jonathan Swift’s Laputa, there has always been something ridiculous about the idea of flying cities, they might become an option if Earth’s surface becomes too polluted or dangerous.

    Sterling argues that when space travel becomes feasible and cheap, the moon, planets and asteroids will be settled, but out of a sense of “cosmic Weltschmerz.”

    Showing an image of the recent L.A. Forum Reader, he reminds the audience that thirty years isn’t that far off.

    Sterling concludes with a discussion of some of his current projects in Turin: the Casa Jasmina, The Share Festival, and – unexpectedly – the Villa Abegg, where he works on a novel in an Eames lounge chair.

    —Huffduffed by ken

  5. Bruce Schneier: “Click Here to Kill Everybody” | Talks at Google

    Computer security professional, privacy specialist and writer Bruce Schneier discusses "Click Here to Kill Everybody", his latest book exploring the risks and security implications of our new, hyper-connected era.

    Bruce lays out common-sense policies that will allow us to enjoy the benefits of this omnipotent age without falling prey to the consequences of its insecurity.

    Get the book here: https://goo.gl/YDaVUX

    —Huffduffed by ken

  6. Q: Why Do Keynote Speakers Keep Suggesting That Improving Security Is Possible?

    A: Because Keynote Speakers Make Bad Life Decisions and Are Poor Role Models

    Some people enter the technology industry to build newer, more exciting kinds of technology as quickly as possible. My keynote will savage these people and will burn important professional bridges, likely forcing me to join a monastery or another penance-focused organization. In my keynote, I will explain why the proliferation of ubiquitous technology is good in the same sense that ubiquitous Venus weather would be good, i.e., not good at all. Using case studies involving machine learning and other hastily-executed figments of Silicon Valley’s imagination, I will explain why computer security (and larger notions of ethical computing) are difficult to achieve if developers insist on literally not questioning anything that they do since even brief introspection would reduce the frequency of git commits. At some point, my microphone will be cut off, possibly by hotel management, but possibly by myself, because microphones are technology and we need to reclaim the stark purity that emerges from amplifying our voices using rams’ horns and sheets of papyrus rolled into cone shapes. I will explain why papyrus cones are not vulnerable to buffer overflow attacks, and then I will conclude by observing that my new start-up papyr.us is looking for talented full-stack developers who are comfortable executing computational tasks on an abacus or several nearby sticks.

    James Mickens, Harvard University

    —Huffduffed by ken

  7. Bruce Sterling | Disrupting Dystopia: The Bruce Sterling Talk | SXSW 2018

    Always a highlight of SXSW Interactive, Bruce Sterling’s annual rant is a compelling take on the state of the world, seen through the eyes of a design futurist, science fiction author, world traveler and Internet maven.

    —Huffduffed by ken

  8. Keynote: Cory Doctorow—”Big Tech’s problem is Big, not Tech”

    In this keynote address, author and advocate, Cory Doctorow, argues that Big Tech is a problem, but the problem isn’t "Tech," it’s "BIG." Giants get to bend policy to suit their ends, they get to strangle potential competitors in their infancy, they are the only game in town, so they can put the squeeze on users and suppliers alike.

    —Huffduffed by ken

  9. Don’t Start a Blog, Start a Cult – Mr. Money Mustache

    Pete Adeney, more commonly known as Mr. Money Mustache, retired at 30 after working as a software engineer for about ten years. He blogs at MrMoneyMustache.com about how he saved money, where he invested it, and how he achieved

    https://blog.ycombinator.com/dont-start-a-blog-start-a-cult-mr-money-mustache/

    —Huffduffed by ken

  10. The Dalrymple Report: With guests John Gruber, Matt Drance, and lots of Heineken

    What do you get when you put John Gruber, Matt Drance, and Jim Dalrymple in a room together with 24 Heineken? A podcast! Sponsor: Backblaze: Unlimited Online…

    http://www.loopinsight.com/2017/06/13/the-dalrymple-report-with-guests-john-gruber-matt-drance-and-lots-of-heineken/

    —Huffduffed by ken

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