Tagged with “writing” (159)

  1. Longform Podcast #289: Craig Mod · Longform

    Craig Mod is a writer and photographer. His podcast is On Margins.

    “You pick up an iPad, you pick up an iPhone—what are you picking up? You’re picking up a chemical-driven casino that just plays on your most base desires for vanity and ego and our obsession with watching train wrecks happen. That’s what we’re picking up and it’s counted in pageviews, because—not to be reductive and say that it’s a capitalist issue, but when you take hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, and you’re building models predicated on advertising, you are gonna create fucked-up algorithms and shitty loops that take away your attention. And guess what? You need to engage with longform texts. You need control of your attention. And so I think part of what subverted our ability to find this utopian reading space is the fact that so much of what’s on these devices is actively working to destroy all of the qualities needed to create that space.”

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-289-craig-mod

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  2. Scratching the Surface — 64. Paul Ford

    1. Paul Ford Paul Ford is a writer, programmer, educator, and technologist. He is currently the co-founder of Postlight, a digital product studio in New York and teaches at the School of Visual Arts….

    http://scratchingthesurface.fm/post/170859573600/64-paul-ford

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  3. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

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  4. Episode 8: Fantastica, with George R.R. Martin and Kim Stanley Robinson

    Science fiction and fantasy have gone from the sidelines to the mainstream. We bring you a live conversation between two of the field’s living legends, George R.R. Martin (“A Song of Ice and Fire,” adapted for television as Game of Thrones, the Wild Card series) and Kim Stanley Robinson (New York 2140, the Mars trilogy), discussing their careers, the history of fantastic literature, and how it shapes our imagination. They came to the Clarke Center in support of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Workshop (clarion.ucsd.edu), the premiere training and proving ground for emerging writers, which the Clarke Center organizes each summer with the Clarion Foundation.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-8-fantastica-with-george-r-r-martin-and-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  5. Anne Leckie: “Provenance” | Talks at Google

    Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke and Locus Awards, joins us in Cambridge to discuss Provenance, an enthralling new novel of power, theft, privilege and birthright.

    A power-driven young woman has just one chance to secure the status she craves and regain priceless lost artifacts prized by her people. She must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned.

    Ingray and her charge will return to her home world to find their planet in political turmoil, at the heart of an escalating interstellar conflict. Together, they must make a new plan to salvage Ingray’s future, her family, and her world, before they are lost to her for good.

    Get the book here: https://goo.gl/nJfmsd

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sapIgYyzAYs
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Nov 2017 22:01:53 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  6. 003: Kevin Kelly, Photographing and Backpacking Asia in the 1970s

    Technologist, futurist, author, and photographer Kevin Kelly discusses traveling during the golden age of global exploration. We cover how photography has changed over the years, his decades investigating Asia in the 1970s and 80s, and how he self-produced (eventually getting it published by Taschen!) his Asia Grace book in the 90s.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/003/

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  7. Hay Festival 2017: Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry - Myth Makers

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldeWcG-Yfjo&t=10s
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:20:30 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by Clampants

  8. Neil Gaiman in Conversation with Junot Díaz

    In conversation with novelist and Pulitzer Prize winner Junot Díaz, celebrate the release of Gaiman’s magnum opus with the author. Join DC All Access Live at 7PM EST and watch mythological history unfold before your eyes. With a special introduction from DC Co-Publisher Jim Lee, this promises to be an evening full of insight and surprises.

    New York Times best-selling writer Neil Gaiman returns to The Sandman with a prequel story to his trailblazing Vertigo series in The Sandman: Overture Deluxe Edition, out on November 10. Rendered in artist JH Williams III’s lush panoramas, The Sandman: Overture takes readers from the birth of the galaxy to Morpheus’s capture, before the events of The Sandman #1, and sheds new light on one of the towering masterpieces in comic book history.

    Pre-signed books will also be available for purchase from Community Bookstore at http//www.communitybookstore.net.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s1kzdP3OlBg
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:57:12 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  9. 002: Frank Chimero, The New Golden Age of Bookmaking

    Designer and author Frank Chimero discusses the process behind his book, "The Shape of Design." We also dig into the normalization of paying creative people to make things via crowdfunding or patronage platforms, and why there’s never been a better time to make books. Show Links: 

    frankchimero.com Shape of Design online

    Shape of Design Kickstarter Kevin Kelly’s 1,000 true fans

    Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, Kickstarter

    Robin Sloan Writes a Book, Kickstarter

    The Field Study Handbook Kickstarter Art Space Tokyo Kickstartup: Successful fundraising with Kickstarter and remaking Art Space Tokyo

    Full transcript and audio online at: https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/  

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/002/

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  10. Cuneiform

    The Egyptians thought literacy was divine; a benefaction which came from the baboon-faced god Thoth. In fact the earliest known script – “cuneiform” – came from Uruk, a Mesopotamian settlement on the banks of the Euphrates in what is now Iraq. What did it say? As Tim Harford describes, cuneiform wasn’t being used for poetry, or to send messages to far-off lands. It was used to create the world’s first accounts. And the world’s first written contracts, too.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p050skkr

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