Tagged with “writing” (162)

  1. 005: Jason Kottke and Twenty Years of kottke.org

    Kottke.org is a website. It is not an app. It is not a product. It is simply a static website, updated daily, running some rickety old blogging software. As of March of 2018 it’s been consistently updated for twenty years. It is largely the product of a single mind: Jason Kottke. Kottke.org has shaped the way many of us have thought about news, blogging, and linking. On Margins talks with Jason about his two decades of blogging, influences in his life that shaped how he works today, and what kottke.org would look like were it a book.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/005/

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  2. Episode 52 - Going Offline | with Jeremy Keith - Relative Paths

    We talked to Clearleft co-founder, author and speaker Jeremy Keith about service workers and his recently released A Book Apart book, Going Offline.

    Coming into this episode I didn’t really know much about service workers. I assumed there were very specific use cases for them, but Jeremy opened our eyes to the fact that they allow access to some very powerful browser features and are useful across the board.

    We also spoke about Jeremy’s recently released A Book Apart Book ‘Going Offline’, I’m really enjoying it. I can’t put it any better than Sarah Drasner (https://sarahdrasnerdesign.com), who said:

    "Jeremy Keith explains service workers with kindness, clarity, and humour in his new book, a must-read for any web developer who wants to learn this exciting new API and enable offline experiences for their applications."

    The first chapter is available as an A List Apart article, link below.

    There were some strong Jukebox Entries this time. Jeremy Chose Catastrophe And The Cure by Explosions In The Sky, from one of my very favourite albums. Ben chose The Celestial Garden by DrumTalk but apparently described a different track in the episode, he’s a sleep deprived new dad so we’ll have mercy on him for that. My pick was Bashed Out by This Is The Kit, a lovely bitter sweet track.

    https://relativepaths.uk/ep52-going-offline-with-jeremy-keith

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  3. Kottke.org’s Jason Kottke, @jkottke | Internet History Podcast

    Jason Kottke, of kottke.org fame, was one of the early bloggers, one of the first bloggers to go pro, and one of the few solo bloggers still going. If you know Kottke.org, then you love it. How could you not? If you’ve never heard of it, you can thank me later. This episode examines what it means to be a publisher on the web for 20 years as well as the discipline required to find cool stuff on the web every single day (almost).

    http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2018/04/kottke-orgs-jason-kottke-jkottke/

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  4. Longform Podcast #289: Craig Mod · Longform

    Craig Mod is a writer and photographer. His podcast is On Margins.

    “You pick up an iPad, you pick up an iPhone—what are you picking up? You’re picking up a chemical-driven casino that just plays on your most base desires for vanity and ego and our obsession with watching train wrecks happen. That’s what we’re picking up and it’s counted in pageviews, because—not to be reductive and say that it’s a capitalist issue, but when you take hundreds of millions of dollars of venture capital, and you’re building models predicated on advertising, you are gonna create fucked-up algorithms and shitty loops that take away your attention. And guess what? You need to engage with longform texts. You need control of your attention. And so I think part of what subverted our ability to find this utopian reading space is the fact that so much of what’s on these devices is actively working to destroy all of the qualities needed to create that space.”

    https://longform.org/posts/longform-podcast-289-craig-mod

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  5. Scratching the Surface — 64. Paul Ford

    1. Paul Ford Paul Ford is a writer, programmer, educator, and technologist. He is currently the co-founder of Postlight, a digital product studio in New York and teaches at the School of Visual Arts….

    http://scratchingthesurface.fm/post/170859573600/64-paul-ford

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  6. Ursula Le Guin & Margaret Atwood - Literary Arts

    Ursula Le Guin begins her lecture with Margaret Atwood by saying, “I emailed Margaret about six weeks or so ago and said, ‘What are we going to talk about?’ and she replied, ‘I expect we will talk about 1) What is fiction?; 2) What is science fiction?; 3) The ones who walk away from Omelas—where do they go?; 4) Is the human race doomed?; 5) Anything else that strikes our fancy.’” The two women proceed to examine these questions and talk through their answers. They delve into their writing processes and motives, creating many humorous analogies for the act of writing, whether they connect it to naked chickens, salted slugs, or dark boudoirs.

    Margaret Atwood is a poet, novelist, short story writer, essayist, and environmental activist. She has written over 40 books and is best known for her fiction, including The Blind Assassin, which won the Man-Booker Prize in 2000. Atwood has used her public profile to advocate for human rights, the environment, and the welfare of writers. She has been president of PEN International and helped found the Writer’s Trust of Canada. As a public intellectual, Atwood is known as a brilliant thinker on a huge range of subjects who has a wry and ironic sense of humor and who is willing to call out platitudes and other forms of lazy thinking.

    Ursula K. Le Guin sold her first story over 50 years ago and has been writing and publishing ever since. Tackling various modes, including realistic fiction, science fiction, high fantasy, children’s literature, screenplays, and essays, her work has challenged traditional understandings of gender roles, politics, race, and identity. She is best known for her fantasy series Earthsea and her science fiction novel The Left Hand of Darkness. She has influenced several generations of writers, including Junot Díaz, Kelly Link, David Mitchell, and Jonathan Lethem. Throughout her career, she has continuously met criticism with courage, causing one critic to note, “It’s been hard for reviewers to cope with Le Guin. She’s often seemed like a writer without a critical context. But that may just mean that the context is still to come.” Among her many honors, Le Guin has received a National Book Award and, most recently, The National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters.

    If we knew everything ahead of time, we wouldn’t write the book. It would be paint by numbers and there wouldn’t be any discoveries.” – Margaret Atwood

    “Rereading a book is much better than reading it. A good book reread is better than a good book read.” – Ursula Le Guin

    “All doors are doors to the future, if you go into them.” – Margaret Atwood

    https://literary-arts.org/archive/ursula-le-guin-margaret-atwood/

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  7. Episode 8: Fantastica, with George R.R. Martin and Kim Stanley Robinson

    Science fiction and fantasy have gone from the sidelines to the mainstream. We bring you a live conversation between two of the field’s living legends, George R.R. Martin (“A Song of Ice and Fire,” adapted for television as Game of Thrones, the Wild Card series) and Kim Stanley Robinson (New York 2140, the Mars trilogy), discussing their careers, the history of fantastic literature, and how it shapes our imagination. They came to the Clarke Center in support of the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers Workshop (clarion.ucsd.edu), the premiere training and proving ground for emerging writers, which the Clarke Center organizes each summer with the Clarion Foundation.

    http://imagination.ucsd.edu/_wp/podcast/episode-8-fantastica-with-george-r-r-martin-and-kim-stanley-robinson/

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  8. Anne Leckie: “Provenance” | Talks at Google

    Ann Leckie, winner of the Hugo, Nebula, Arthur C. Clarke and Locus Awards, joins us in Cambridge to discuss Provenance, an enthralling new novel of power, theft, privilege and birthright.

    A power-driven young woman has just one chance to secure the status she craves and regain priceless lost artifacts prized by her people. She must free their thief from a prison planet from which no one has ever returned.

    Ingray and her charge will return to her home world to find their planet in political turmoil, at the heart of an escalating interstellar conflict. Together, they must make a new plan to salvage Ingray’s future, her family, and her world, before they are lost to her for good.

    Get the book here: https://goo.gl/nJfmsd

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sapIgYyzAYs
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 09 Nov 2017 22:01:53 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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  9. 003: Kevin Kelly, Photographing and Backpacking Asia in the 1970s

    Technologist, futurist, author, and photographer Kevin Kelly discusses traveling during the golden age of global exploration. We cover how photography has changed over the years, his decades investigating Asia in the 1970s and 80s, and how he self-produced (eventually getting it published by Taschen!) his Asia Grace book in the 90s.

    https://craigmod.com/onmargins/003/

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  10. Hay Festival 2017: Neil Gaiman and Stephen Fry - Myth Makers

    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ldeWcG-Yfjo&t=10s
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Fri, 28 Jul 2017 15:20:30 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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