katkat / tags / technology

Tagged with “technology” (4)

  1. Still Life with Emotional Contagion

    A discussion of creation myths, internalized histories, ”production functions”, and the uncomfortable proposition that everything new is samizdat again.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/aaronstraupcope/

    Aaron Straup Cope is from Montréal but these days you can find him in New York, where he works at the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt Design Musuem.

    Before that, he was living in San Francisco and working with Stamen Design. And before that, he was working on Flickr …before it all went to hell in a handbasket. At each of these places, Aaron has left a trail of machine tags and maps in his wake.

    I remember waaaaay back, before any of those young upstarts, when Aaron worked on the Mirror Project at the turn of the century. The fact that the Mirror Project is still up and running after all this time is testament to Aaron’s interest—nay, obsession—with personal archives …although his particular penchant is for the more personal kind, like Parallel Flickr and Privatesquare.

    Aaron has a love and a knowledge of food that is truly awe-inspiring. But that’s not the (only) reason I’ve asked him to speak at dConstruct. He’s speaking at this year’s dConstruct because I don’t see why the Museums and the Web conference should have him all to themselves.

    And if you aren’t yet convinced of his bona fides, you should know that Aaron Straup Cope is one of the Directors of Revolving Technologies at the Spinny Bar Historical Society.

    —Huffduffed by katkat

  2. Humans Are Only a Self-driving Car’s Way of Making Another Self-driving Car

    Over 10,000 years ago we lived in balance with the network. Since then we’ve tried to control, rule and bend it to our whims. In all that time, we’ve never asked ourselves if we’re building something that controls us?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/briansuda/

    Brian Suda is an informatician, which is definitely a real word and not just something he made up once. It is perfectly cromulent.

    Brian lives and works in Reykjavík by way of Edinburgh by way of St. Louis. He’s been living in Iceland long enough that he can correctly pronounce Eyjafjallajökull. That’s quite an impressive party trick …unless the party is in Iceland.

    Brian is a data hound, moving from project to project, always finding interesting ways to expose and represent the data exhaust of our network engine. He built one of the earliest microformats parsers and has written a book on Designing With Data.

    Together with Aitor Garcia, Brian has formed Analog. Their first project involves the production of Kickstarter-funded notebooks beautifully embossed with geographical data.

    At some point, he plans to graph all the world‘s baked goods on a hypercube of bread.

    —Huffduffed by katkat

  3. 2030

    Privacy’s dead. What happens next?

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/tomscott/

    Tom Scott is from the internet. He is an excellent ambassador, whether it’s skilfully explaining programming concepts or re-enacting cat GIFs.

    He makes entertaining and thought-provoking videos, such as Danger: Humans and Welcome To Life. There’s an ongoing video series called Things You Might Not Know, in which Tom and guests divulge facts that have a significant probabilty of being hitherto-unknown by you, and another series called Tom’s Language Files about linguistics, languages, and love. But mainly linguistics.

    Tom doesn’t just make videos though. He also makes handy online services like the Star Wars Weather Forecast and the Magical Mystical Ley Line Locator.

    —Huffduffed by katkat

  4. Information Doesn’t Want to be Free

    There are three iron laws of information age creativity, freedom and business, woven deep into the fabric of the Internet’s design, the functioning of markets, and the global system of regulation and trade agreements.

    You can’t attain any kind of sustained commercial, creative success without understanding these laws — but more importantly, the future of freedom itself depends on getting them right.

    http://2014.dconstruct.org/conference/corydoctorow/

    Cory Doctorow is a science fiction author, activist, journalist, blogger and co-editor of Boing Boing.

    He has written a ton of great books. If you haven’t read them, I recommend starting with Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom and working your way through to his collaboration with Charles Stross, Rapture of the Nerds. Don’t miss out on his fantastic Young Adult novels For The Win, Pirate Cinema, Little Brother and its sequel Homeland. They’re all great.

    Former European director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founder of the Open Rights Group, Cory is a tireless fighter for freedom, campaigning against censorship, DRM, government surveillance and other plagues of our time.

    Cory delivered the closing keynote at the very first dConstruct and it’s truly fitting that he’s back ten years later when the theme of this year’s dConstruct is “Living With The Network.”

    —Huffduffed by katkat