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jrsinclair / James Sinclair

I live in Australia and like to write about JavaScript and other things.

There is one person in jrsinclair’s collective.

Huffduffed (918)

  1. Jess Lee knows how to build a community of delighted users at Hustle Con

    Jess Lee is the CEO and Co-Founder of Polyvore. Prior to co-founding Polyvore, Jess was a product manager at Google, where she worked on Google Maps and launched features like My Maps and draggable driving directions. In her talk, Jess discusses how to build a community of delighted users.

    Polyvore is a way to discover and shop for things you love. Their global community has created over 100 million collage-like “sets” that are shared across the web. Polyvore disrupt the traditional e-commerce model by giving everyone everywhere a voice in shaping today’s trends and influencing purchases. Polyvore’s savvy community is ahead of the curve, predicting trends before they hit the mainstream. Start shopping at http://www.polyvore.com/

    Headquartered in Silicon Valley, Polyvore is funded by Benchmark Capital, Matrix Partners, DAG Ventures, Goldman Sachs and NV Investments (Vivi Nevo).

    Hustle Con is a badass conference where the best non-technical founders (aka hustlers) teach how they got started and give practical advice on growing your startup. If you’ve heard of a hacker, well a hustler is its counterpart. Basically, it’s like a rock n’ roll version of TED, except not as hoity-toity. The catch? None of our speakers know how to code.

    Check us out at http://www.hustlecon.com/

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Q9wKtRHbgGQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 22 Jul 2017 22:25:18 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with jess lee

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  2. Building Resilience in Web Development and Operations - John Allspaw at USI

    Building a resilient system means spending time (and money) to anticipate, monitor, respond, and learn from failure. Yet learning from failures can be surprisingly tricky.

    Here, John Allspaw talks about how a growing web application (Etsy.com) can aim to be resilient in this context, which applies to not only the software and infrastructure, but also the development and operations staff themselves who build and maintain this growth and change. John provides plenty of technical details to illustrate. Information and subscription on http://www.usievents.com

    Follow USI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/USIEvents Follow USI on LinkedIn: http://linkd.in/13Ls21Y Subscribe to our channel: http://bit.ly/19sPpSp

    More information on OCTO Technology: http://www.octo.com

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    Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=VlrigTM7rok
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Mon, 17 Jul 2017 22:15:20 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with john allspaw

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  3. Brian Goetz - FP is Dead Long Live FP

    ### Abstract

    While programmers tend to divide themselves into communities along language or paradigm lines, the reality is that the OO and FP communities have a great deal to learn from each other. As developers, we should learn classic OO, learn classical FP, and then strive to rise above them both.

    ### Bio

    Brian Goetz is the Java Language Architect at Oracle Corporation, and was the specification lead for JSR-335 (Lambda Expressions for the Java Programming Language.) He is the author of the best-selling Java Concurrency in Practice, as well as over 75 articles on Java development, and has been fascinated by programming since Jimmy Carter was President.

    —- Original video: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ROL58LJGNfA
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Sat, 15 Jul 2017 10:08:59 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with brian goetz

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  4. OSCON 2013: “Functional Thinking” - Neal Ford

    http://oreilly.com/go/oscon-js-html5

    Learning the syntax of a new language is easy, but learning to think under a different paradigm is hard. This session helps you transition from an object-oriented imperative programmer to a functional programmer, using Java, Clojure and Scala for examples.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7aYS9PcAITQ
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 22:54:04 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with neal ford

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  5. Erik Meijer: Functional Programming

    Cross posted from http://channel9.msdn.com/Shows/Going+Deep/Erik-Meijer-Functional-Programming.

    Erik Meijer discusses functional programming languages, academic versus real-world application of functional programming languages and himself.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0N1aZ6SnBk
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 22:52:13 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with erik meijer

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  6. Talk: Functional Programming You Already Know - Kevlin Henney (Curbralan) - Codemotion Rome 2015

    Functional Programming You Already Know

    From JVM to .NET languages, from minor coding idioms to system-level architectures, functional programming is enjoying a long overdue surge in interest. Functional programming is certainly not a new idea and, although not apparently as mainstream as object-oriented and procedural programming, many of its concepts are also more familiar than many programmers believe. This talk examines functional and declarative programming styles from the point of view of coding patterns, little languages and programming techniques already familiar to many programmers.

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNKXTlCOGEc
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 22:48:40 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  7. Alan addresses Qualcomm

    Alan Kay gives a talk at Qualcomm in San Diego, on October 30, 2013.

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/82301919
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 22:45:48 GMT Available for 30 days after download

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    Tagged with alan kay

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  8. Lambda Jam 2014 - Eric Meijer - The Lost Art of Denotational Semantics

    Denotational Semantics, in this context the art of crafting interpreters for a given programming language using a purely functional meta-language http://people.cis.ksu.edu/~schmidt/text/densem.html, was one of the very first applications of functional programming, with Christopher Strachey as one of the world’s earliest FP hackers.

    By studying Denotational Semantics we gain deep insights into programming languages while at the same time learning numerous cool and practical programming tricks. For example monads found their way from pure Category Theory via Denotational Semantics into contemporary programming languages. And those that are actually enjoying writing callbacks with lambda expressions in Node.js, are believe it or not, using a technique that was invented more than half a century ago by theoreticians to model GOTOs in programming languages. Algebraic datatypes and folds? Those must be recent innovations! Nope, Strachey, Scott, and Stoy were using those long before most of us were even born. In short, a thorough understanding of Denotational Semantics is a necessary condition to reach FP mastery.

    In this talk we start with a StackOverflow question about the semantics of try-catch-finally in Scala, and spell out in detail how this widely used, but often poorly understood language feat…

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    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOl4E8x3fmw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 11:11:01 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with eric meijer

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  9. Lambda Jam 2014 - Eric Meijer - The Lost Art of Denotational Semantics

    Denotational Semantics, in this context the art of crafting interpreters for a given programming language using a purely functional meta-language http://people.cis.ksu.edu/~schmidt/text/densem.html, was one of the very first applications of functional programming, with Christopher Strachey as one of the world’s earliest FP hackers.

    By studying Denotational Semantics we gain deep insights into programming languages while at the same time learning numerous cool and practical programming tricks. For example monads found their way from pure Category Theory via Denotational Semantics into contemporary programming languages. And those that are actually enjoying writing callbacks with lambda expressions in Node.js, are believe it or not, using a technique that was invented more than half a century ago by theoreticians to model GOTOs in programming languages. Algebraic datatypes and folds? Those must be recent innovations! Nope, Strachey, Scott, and Stoy were using those long before most of us were even born. In short, a thorough understanding of Denotational Semantics is a necessary condition to reach FP mastery.

    In this talk we start with a StackOverflow question about the semantics of try-catch-finally in Scala, and spell out in detail how this widely used, but often poorly understood language feat…

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOl4E8x3fmw
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 11:11:01 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with eric meijer

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

  10. KEYNOTE 1: Alan Kay - Rethinking Design, Risk, and Software

    Our increasingly complex needs have led us to build increasing complex software. We’ve done this in an incremental fashion, building code on top of code. We write understandable snippets of code built on programming languages we know well and then bundle them into program structures to perform complex tasks. This incremental process may seem to have low risk at the snippet level, but it leads to program structures that can be hundreds of millions of lines of code that is intractable to change, redesign, and understanding, nor in the end is it easy to design. It also leads to code with potentially unwanted emergent properties. Today, we know how to create programs that can create programming languages. So why not write software that closely follows the problem, without a programming language, then let other programs create the programming language to support it? If we apply this rethinking to the design process, both problems and solutions can be thought of in terms of relational str

    ===
    Original video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QboI_1WJUlM
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/ on Thu, 13 Jul 2017 11:08:16 GMT Available for 30 days after download

    download

    Tagged with alan kay

    —Huffduffed by jrsinclair

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