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josephrooks / collective / tags / digital preservation

Tagged with “digital preservation” (42)

  1. Internet Archive founder Brewster Kahle on Recode Decode - Recode

    On this episode of Recode Decode, hosted by Kara Swisher, entrepreneur, activist and founder of the Internet Archive Brewster Kahle discussed the growth of the open internet and the importance of having a history of the internet available to everyone.

    The Internet Archive’s historical search engine, the "Wayback Machine," grows by half a billion pages a week.

    http://www.recode.net/2017/3/8/14843408/transcript-internet-archive-founder-brewster-kahle-wayback-machine-recode-decode

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  2. Where to find what’s disappeared online, and a whole lot more: the Internet Archive | Public Radio International

    The Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine is much beloved by investigative reporters and others, looking to find out what a webpage looked like at some point in the past, even if it’s since disappeared. But the Internet Archive’s work is much more ambitious than that. Founder Brewster Kahle says through scanning books and recording video feeds around the world, it aims to make all human knowledge universally available on a decentralized Web, and illiberal impulses among leaders in America and elsewhere are only "putting a fire under our butts" to do the work, swiftly and effectively.

    https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-02-23/where-find-whats-disappeared-online-and-whole-lot-more-internet-archive

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  3. Preserving the Internet of the Past, Building the Internet of the Future | WCAI

    The internet is so ingrained in our daily lives, that it can be hard to remember life before it. And it changes so quickly it’s equally hard to know what the future might hold. One thing that’s clear is that more and more people will be connected and doing more and different things with this technology.

    It’s a bit tricky to pinpoint when the internet began. Was it the first email? The first public network? What we do know is exactly when we started keeping a record of what’s on the web - October 26, 1996.

    That’s the day Brewster Kahle launched Internet Archive. A computer engineer, internet activist, and digital librarian, Kahle draws inspiration from the Library of Congress and – further back – the great Library of Alexandria. Universal access to all knowledge is his ideal.

    As early as 1980, the idea that internet technology could make that possible was floating around the computer science community. As technology improved, the idea grew. By 1996, Kahle could archive every page from every website every two months.

    “It was kind of like what the search engines were doing,” he told WCAI. “Take a snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and another snapshot, and we’ve been doing that for 20 years.”

    Twenty years of the web is a lot of data. The archive is currently 265 billion pages. Internet Archive also includes music, digitized books, and just about anything Kahle can legally get his hands on.

    “Whoever is going to be president in 20 years, we probably have her website [from] when she’s in high school,” he said.

    That may seem unnecessary, even unwelcome, to some. Kahle concedes there is plenty on the web that isn’t intended for posterity, and Internet Archive respects requests to have content removed. But he sees value in preserving web content that might be lost inadvertently.

    “Even though we use this metaphor of ‘page,’ which sounds like books, which sounds like permanent, it really isn’t,” he said. “The average life of a web page is only 100 days.”

    In the Internet Archive, those ephemeral pages become part of a permanent record of our collective internet experience. Browsing the Internet Archive, one lesson is immediately apparent – that experience has changed a lot in twenty years.

    http://capeandislands.org/post/preserving-internet-past-building-internet-future#stream/0

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  4. Internet history is fragile. This archive is making sure it doesn’t disappear | PBS NewsHour

    What’s online doesn’t necessarily last forever. Content on the Internet is revised and deleted all the time. Hyperlinks “rot,” and with them goes history, lost in space. With that in mind, Brewster Kahle set out to develop the Internet Archive, a digital library with the mission of preserving all the information on the World Wide Web, for all who wish to explore. Jeffrey Brown reports.

    http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/internet-history-fragile-archive-making-sure-doesnt-disappear/

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  5. Internet Archive Founder Brewster Kahle on Preserving Knowledge and Affordable Housing

    Brewster Kahle wants all knowledge to be accessible digitally. He has worked for over 25 years to make that dream a reality. Kahle is the founder of the Internet Archive, a free online library that preserves books, movies, music, software and even websites via its Wayback Machine. Today, Kahle is also trying to apply open source principles to ease the Bay Area housing crisis. He joins us as part of our First Person series, which highlights the leaders and innovators who make the Bay Area unique.

    https://www.popuparchive.com/collections/3246/items/44451

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  6. Backing Up the World Wide Web - Science Friday

    The average lifespan of a web page is 100 days. In an era of thousands of quickly changing websites, blog posts, and tweets, how can we archive the web and all other digital content? Digital librarian Brewster Kahle and historian Abby Smith Rumsey discuss what it takes to save old websites—and the entire Internet—and what society might lose if we don’t.

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/segments/backing-up-the-world-wide-web/

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  7. Kyle Drake - Making the Web Permanent

    Kyle Drake’s talk at Seattle IPFS Meetup July 24 2015

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    Original video: https://vimeo.com/137657331
    Downloaded by http://huffduff-video.snarfed.org/

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  8. Brewster Kahle - Lock The Web Open

    Talk by Brewster Kahle at the Ford Foundation NetGain Event on February 11, 2015. Talk written out.

    https://archive.org/details/bresterkahlenetgain

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  9. Artifacts (redux) | Benjamen Walker’s Theory of Everything

    Photographer Robert Burley takes pictures of the end of analog for his book The Disappearance Of Darkness. Christine Frohnert and Christiane Paul explain why it is difficult to care for digital artworks and Social Media theorist Nathan Jurgenson wants us to understand what is truly revolutionary about ephemeral photographs and platforms like Snapchat.

    http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/media.blubrry.com/toe/p/cdn.toe.prx.org/wp-content/uploads/toe49artifactsredux.mp3

    Podcast: Download (Duration: 22:59 — 21.0MB)

    Subscribe: iTunes

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    https://toe.prx.org/2015/08/artifacts-redux/

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  10. The Digital Human, Series 7: Silt

    Aleks Krotoski explores if we have all become digital hoarders. When our digital junk drawers are bigger than we can comprehend, do we lose the sense of what is worth keeping?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05v7tjt

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