josephaleo / tags / scifi

Tagged with “scifi” (7)

  1. Agent of the Imperium, Part 2

    A Story of the Traveller Universe Kindle Edition. Jonathan Bland is a Decider, empowered by the Emperor himself to deal with the inevitable crises of empire. In the service of the Empire, he has killed more people than anyone in the history of Humanity, to save a hundred times as many.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  2. Agent of the Imperium, Part 1

    A Story of the Traveller Universe Kindle Edition. Jonathan Bland is a Decider, empowered by the Emperor himself to deal with the inevitable crises of empire. In the service of the Empire, he has killed more people than anyone in the history of Humanity, to save a hundred times as many.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  3. Outward Bound: Colonizing the Oort Cloud

    Far beyond even Pluto and the Kuiper Belt is a vast and mostly empty region of space that we theorize may contain trillions of comets and other icy bodies. Frozen and barren though they would be, we will consider how they might one day become thriving and comfortable habitats for us.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  4. Hive Minds

    The concept of linking many minds together to act in concert, or even fuse into a new singular entity, has been popular in science fiction for decades. Today we will explore the idea and Networked Intelligence in general, to see how realistic it is, and what benefits or concerns might arise from it.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  5. Eternal Reaches - Mongoose Traveller - S01E01 - Journey to Kusk

    The crew of the Aurora take aboard a cargo and passengers, among their number is Glissa a renowned remnant scientist and daughter of Glorl. A request has been made by the Science Departmental Head of Kusk for some expertise in what appears to be some still intact remnant ruins on the surface of the planet. The Aurora, currently docked at Farharbour above Crear, makes ready to head into jumpspace and take the illustrious Glissa to her destination.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  6. Revelation Space, Part 1

    When human colonists settled the Amarantin homeworld, few of them bothered to question the disappearance of its native population almost a million years before. But in the year 2551, one man, Dan Sylveste, is convinced that solving the riddle of the Amarantin is vital to human survival. As he nears the truth, he learns that someone wants him dead. Because the Amarantin were destroyed for a reason. And if that reason is made public, the universe—and reality itself—could be forever altered. This sprawling operatic novel ranges across vast gulfs of time and space to arrive at a terrifying conclusion.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo

  7. Chasm City, Part 1

    In this worthy follow-up to his well-received first novel, Revelation Space (2001), an especially intelligent far-future foray, British author Reynolds transmutes space opera into a noirish, baroque, picaresque mystery tale. Honor requires that Tanner Mirabel, a weapons specialist/bodyguard, track down and destroy the man who killed his boss. Tanner’s pursuit takes him to the planet Yellowstone, where a nano-plague has mutated the glittering human cultural showcase of Chasm City into something bizarre, dark and extremely dangerous. He’s aided or threatened or both, at different times by a host of human and not-quite-human characters. Relying on his own combat skills and hard-boiled attitude, Tanner keeps seeking revenge even though he begins to wonder why he’s doing it, especially after intrusions of other people’s memories lead him to suspect he’s not who he thinks he is. Inventiveness and tone are Reynolds’s strong points. Presented in a sustained burst of weirdness, the novel’s details are consistently startling but convincing in context, and the loose ends eventually tie neatly together. The narrator’s tough-guy stance works too, both as an expression of Tanner’s personality and as a defensive reaction to the setting’s intimidating strangeness. Think of a combination of the movie Blade Runner and one of Jack Vance’s ironic SF adventure novels. If the ending feels a bit flat, that’s probably inevitable after the exuberant display of wonders earlier. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc. —This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

    —Huffduffed by josephaleo