jordelver / tags / web

Tagged with “web” (10)

  1. Once Upon a Time in the Web | Andy Clarke | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Hold on there Bald Eagle. Why are we always in such a hurry? What’s the rush to reduce the number of clicks? Why not make people think? In movies, and in comic books, time and pace are as important as action. So in thirty short minutes, Andy Clarke investigates ways to stretch time using visual design to make more compelling web pages that keep people thinking — for longer.

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  2. The New Language of Web Design | Dan Rubin | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Our industry has aged into double digits, but much of the language we use to describe what we do and how things work is borrowed or repurposed, sometimes without issue, but often leading to confusion. Having a distinct set of terminology is an important sign of maturity for a line of work, those words and phrases to lead the next generation of practitioners — and it’s high time we set about creating it.

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  3. With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility | Elliot Jay Stocks | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    Recent developments in web technologies like HTML5 and CSS3 have allowed us to build a richer web, full of advanced visual treatments like web fonts, animations, transformations, and drop-shadows. But have we got carried away with our new toys? Just because we can use a drop-shadow doesn’t mean we have to. In this new and often controversial talk, Elliot looks at solid design principles that will turn a good website into a great website, examines the scenarios where it’s better to stay away from unnecessary visual effects, and attempts to find the sweet spot in between the two extremes. "With great power comes great responsibility," said Uncle Ben, and Spidey hadn’t even used border-radius!

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  4. A New Canon | Mark Boulton | New Adventures In Web Design conference | Nottingham | 20th January 2011

    In the real world, responsive design is nothing new. Products adapt to our needs. Technology monitors local environments to adjust lighting, temperature and even physical spaces. But what about web? In designing with words, the desire to bind content to a device has been around as long as there have been books. Mark will take you from desire to implementation, from theory to practice. How can we build upon what we know from literally hundreds of years of responsive design practice to define a new era of online publishing? An era where we strive for the same level of human / technology connection that started with the monks.

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  5. Jeremy Keith on Using Blue

    In episode three of Using Blue we talk with Jeremy Keith of Clearleft about how HTML5 snuck up on him, responsive web design, catch phrases and catch phrases.

    We head down a great path of discussion with Jeremy while we talk about:

    • Buzz words in the industry.
    • HTML5.
    • Ajax.
    • How maybe UX and design are really the same thing.
    • Brian Rieger and his work on yiibu.com
    • How content management systems need to structure their content.
    • Responsive web design as the most exciting thing to hit the web, maybe ever.
    • Is Drupal a CMS or is it a framework?
    • How naming conventions in Drupal can cause confusion.
    • Who is Drupal really going after as their target audience.
    • The concept of Drupal distributions.
    • Native apps vs the mobile web with progressive enhancements. Jason Grigsby has a good post on how you can’t link to an app and the issues with that.
    • The mobile first approach that Luke Wroblewski writes and talks about and we love.
    • Getting into the browser as fast as possible. Essentially designing in the browser whenever possible.
    • Style tiles as an excellent communication tool in the design process.
    • The upcoming dConstruct conference. An excellent conference in Brighton, UK on September 2, 2011.
    • Also the Brighton Digital Festival.

    http://usingblue.com/episodes/jeremy-keith

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  6. Mobile First

    For years, most Web teams have designed for the desktop. Mobile, if it even happened, was a port off the desktop version, designed and built before anyone even considered the mobile experience. This made perfect sense for a while. Browsing the Web on mobile phones was painful; carriers controlled access to the Web on their devices; and mobile network speeds made everything often grind to a halt.

    But things have changed so dramatically over the past few years that starting with the desktop may be an increasingly backwards way of thinking about a Web product. Designing for mobile first can not only open up new opportunities for growth, it can lead to a better overall user experience for a Web site or application.

    In this presentation, Luke Wroblewski will dig into the three key reasons to consider mobile first: mobile is seeing explosive growth; mobile forces you to focus; and mobile extends your capabilities.

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  7. SitePoint Podcast #111: Responsive Web Design with Jeremy Keith

    Episode 111 of The SitePoint Podcast is now available! This week Louis Simoneau (@rssaddict) talks with Jeremy Keith (@adactio), a UK-based web designer and author of several books on web design. We talk about Jeremy’s views on Responsive Web Design, and how Jeremy feels this is creating an exciting time to be a web designer.

    http://blogs.sitepoint.com/podcast-111-responsive-web-design-with-jeremy-keith/

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  8. Web Directions @media: Jeremy Keith — Hot Topics

    Continuing a popular @media tradition, the final session for day one, hosted by Jeremy Keith, will feature a handful of speakers discussing questions posed by conference attendees. Wear your flak jacket: there will be controversy!

    Panelists:

    • John Allsopp
    • Hannah Donovan
    • Simon Willison
    • Christian Crumlish

    —Huffduffed by jordelver

  9. Mark Boulton — Designing grid systems

    Grid systems have been used in print design, architecture and interior design for generations. Now, on the web, the same rules of grid system composition and usage no longer apply. Content is viewed in many ways; from RSS feeds to email. Content is viewed on many devices; from mobile phones to laptops. Users can manipulate the browser, they can remove content, resize the canvas, resize the typefaces. A designer is no longer in control of this presentation. So where do grid systems fit in to all that?

    http://www.webdirections.org/resources/mark-boulton-designing-grid-systems/

    —Huffduffed by jordelver